AMF Favorite Books Poll: THE RESULTS

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Listyguy
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AMF Favorite Books Poll: THE RESULTS

Postby Listyguy » Sun Sep 17, 2017 3:35 pm

Welcome to the results from the first AMF favorite books poll! I’ll be unveiling the top 100, but in total 751 different books received votes! I'll start off with a thank you to everyone who participated in the poll:

StevieFan13
Dexter
Gillingham
whuntva
bonnielaurel
DaveC
antonius
schaefer.tk
madzong
prosecutorgodot
DocBrown
Chambord
Nick
Krurze
ordinaryperson
Michel
Petri
Listyguy
Miguel
Styrofoam Boots
Greg

Before beginning the presentation, the only other note that I wanted to make were that I’ll be using thegreatestbooks.org for an “acclaimed” rank to compare our list to. Also, if you spot any mistakes or errors, do let me know!

On that note, let’s get started with the countdown!

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Re: AMF Favorite Books Poll: THE RESULTS

Postby Listyguy » Sun Sep 17, 2017 4:33 pm

100. The Hobbit – J.R.R. Tolkien (1937)




Score:
94.582

Voters:
prosecutorgodot (#19)
Dexter (#36)
madzong (#53)
antonius (#62)

The truth is that in this book a number of good things, never before united, have come together: a fund of humour, an understanding of children, and a happy fusion of the scholar's with the poet's grasp of mythology... The professor has the air of inventing nothing. He has studied trolls and dragons at first hand and describes them with that fidelity that is worth oceans of glib "originality."
-C.S. Lewis

The Greatest Books rank: 525


99. The Corrections – Jonathon Franzen (2001)




Score:
94.835

Voters:
Gillingham (#12)
Dexter (#32)
schaefer.tk (#49)

Franzen realised something like this when he read Underworld, and pledged to put the matter right by producing, in his novel The Corrections, a book of DeLillo-like breadth and intellectual critique which was centred on human beings. He proposed, in effect, a softened DeLilloism. So The Corrections is itself a correction, and as such it succeeds marvellously.
-James Wood, for The Guardian

The Greatest Books rank: 211


98. East of Eden – John Steinbeck (1952)




Score:
95.506

Voters:
DocBrown (#3)
DaveC (#91)

It has everything in it I have been able to learn about my craft or profession in all these years...I think everything else I have written has been, in a sense, practice for this.
-John Steinbeck

The Greatest Books rank: 743


97. The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao - Junot Diaz (2007)




Score:
95.511

Voters:
prosecutorgodot (#15)
Listyguy (#19)
Dexter (#71)

But “The Brief Wondrous Life” isn’t Oscar’s story alone. Indeed, he often seems like a bit of an exile in the book that bears his name. The recounting of his thwarted romances, his suicide attempt, his friendships and his literary projects is interrupted — and overshadowed — by episodes of family history that reverse the migratory path from the D.R. to the U.S.A. and concentrate on the women in Oscar’s family.
-A.O. Scott, for The New York Times

The Greatest Books rank: 336


96. 2666 - Roberto Bolaño (2004)




Score:
96.453

Voters:
Nick (#5)
Petri (#78)
Greg (#95)

[Bolaño] wrote 2666 in a race against death. His ambitions were appropriately outsized: to make some final reckoning, to take life's measure, to wrestle to the limits of the void. So his reach extends beyond northern Mexico in the 1990s to Weimar Berlin and Stalin's Moscow, to Dracula's castle and the bottom of the sea.
-Ben Ehrenreich, for The Los Angeles Times

The Greatest Books rank: 409

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Re: AMF Favorite Books Poll: THE RESULTS

Postby DocBrown » Sun Sep 17, 2017 4:53 pm

Great start, ListyGuy. I'm afraid this list might be overshadowed by some other rollout going on, though...
"If you're not outraged, you're not paying attention." Heather Heyer, hero (1985-2017)

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Re: AMF Favorite Books Poll: THE RESULTS

Postby Listyguy » Sun Sep 17, 2017 5:46 pm

DocBrown wrote:Great start, ListyGuy. I'm afraid this list might be overshadowed by some other rollout going on, though...

Indeed...That's just how the cookie crumbles, I suppose.

I'm also more interested in the albums poll, to be completely honest :whistle: But these results should also be exciting!

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Re: AMF Favorite Books Poll: THE RESULTS

Postby antonius » Sun Sep 17, 2017 6:29 pm

...nevertheless I'll be checking in regularly, Listy.
This is the first time this kind of poll is being run, so it should be interesting.
Thanks for running this, BTW.

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Re: AMF Favorite Books Poll: THE RESULTS

Postby DaveC » Sun Sep 17, 2017 7:58 pm

Great start Listguy. Thanks for running this. Right there 2 books I need to read (2666 & Oscar Wao).

btw making progress with Infinite Jest, and loving it.

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Re: AMF Favorite Books Poll: THE RESULTS

Postby prosecutorgodot » Sun Sep 17, 2017 8:55 pm

Good start, Listyguy!

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Re: AMF Favorite Books Poll: THE RESULTS

Postby Listyguy » Sun Sep 17, 2017 11:00 pm

95. Narcissus and Goldmund – Hermann Hesse (1930)



Also Known As: Narziß und Goldmund

Score:
97.87

Voters:
Petri (#4)
Schaefer.tk (#47)

The novel poses interesting philosophical questions, this being the battle between hedonism and a life of the mind versus altruism and how it works with a life devoted to the spirit.
–Joel Connelly, for Seatle P-I

The Greatest Books rank: Not Ranked


TIE 92. The World of Yesterday – Stefan Zweig (1942)




Full Title: The World of Yesterday: Memories of a European
Also Known As: Die Welt von Gestern: Erinnerungen eines Europäers

Score:
100

Voters:
Miguel (#1)

Zweig sent the manuscript to his publisher the day before his death, in a suicide pact with his second wife, in Brazil in 1942, so one might expect an extended suicide note, but it is far from that. It is, rather, a kind of obituary, not of its author but of the world he grew up in, of which he rightly saw himself as a distinguished representative: “nine-tenths of what the world of the 19th century celebrated as Viennese culture was in fact culture promoted and nurtured or even created by the Jews of Vienna”.
–Lewis Jones, for The Telegraph

The Greatest Books rank: Not Ranked


TIE 92. Sentimental Education – Gustave Flaubert (1869)




Also Known As: L'Éducation sentimentale

Score:
100

Voters:
Schaefer.tk (#1)

Writers of an ironic temperament revere it for the qualities that have alienated the larger reading public: its arduous purity of style; its uncompromising pessimism, free of cant; and its refusal to ennoble human nature.
–Judith Thurman, for The New Yorker

The Greatest Books rank:106


TIE 92. Ishmael – Daniel Quinn (1992)




Score:
100

Voters:
whuntva (#1)

A thoughtful, fearlessly low-key novel about the role of our species in the planet... laid out for us with an originality and a clarity that few would deny.
New York Times

The Greatest Books rank: Not Ranked


91. Heart of Darkness – Joseph Conrad (1899)




Score:
100.75

Voters:
Dexter (#10)
Listyguy (#34)
Gillingham (#43)

It is tempting to see Heart of Darkness as a masterfully constructed parable on human nature (witness Apocalypse Now, Francis Ford Coppola's film adaptation, in which the action was transposed to south-east Asia) but as historian Adam Hochschild has pointed out in King Leopold's Ghost, about the king's rape of the Congo, Conrad himself was quite clear that it was based on specific events he had witnessed
–Phil Mongredien, for The Guardian

The Greatest Books rank:29

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Re: AMF Favorite Books Poll: THE RESULTS

Postby Petri » Mon Sep 18, 2017 7:45 am

Great start! Very interested to see the results (Luckily I haven't checked the individual lists so carefully that I could tell which books are in top 10.).
I'm going to read all the books in top 20 that I haven't read yet (or five highest ranked books if I have read (almost) everything in top 20).

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Re: AMF Favorite Books Poll: THE RESULTS

Postby Listyguy » Mon Sep 18, 2017 8:00 pm

90. The Odyssey – Homer (~800 BC)



Also Known As: Ὀδύσσεια

Score:
101.29

Voters:
antonius (#10)
Nick (#25)
Bonnielaurel (#64)

As well as all of this, the Odyssey is a poem of extraordinary pleasures: it is a salt-caked, storm-tossed, wine-dark treasury of tales of terrifying monsters and sexy witches, of alluring sirens and inscrutable queens, a poem that takes you down to the coldly echoing chambers of the dead and back up to the coves and cliffs and winding paths of Ithaca.
–Charlotte Higgins, for The Guardian

The Greatest Books rank: 4


89. Ubik – Philip K. Dick (1969)




Score:
101.85

Voters:
ordinaryperson (#8)
Michel (#17)

If anyone has a coherent summary that wraps up all the conflict in the novel, I'd love to hear it, but I suspect the task is impossible. Not, I should stress, through any fault on the author's part. This is a book that gives real meaning to the cliche "defies explanation".
–Sam Jordison, for The Guardian

The Greatest Books rank: 1202


88. Romeo and Juliet – William Shakespeare (1597)




Score:
102.33

Voters:
prosecutorgodot (#11)
Chambord (#30)
Listyguy (#39)

In Romeo and Juliet, Shakespeare employs several dramatic techniques that have garnered praise from critics; most notably the abrupt shifts from comedy to tragedy.
–Kevin Odoobo, for The New Times

The Greatest Books rank: 285


87. And Then There Were None – Agatha Christie (1939)




Score:
102.72

Voters:
Petri (#23)
bonnielaurel (#27)
madzong (#42)
Miguel (#53)

When you read what happens after that you will not believe it, but you will keep on reading, and as one incredible event is followed by another even more incredible you will still keep on reading. The whole thing is utterly impossible and utterly fascinating. It is the most baffling mystery that Agatha Christie has ever written, and if any other writer has ever surpassed it for sheer puzzlement the name escapes our memory. We are referring, of course, to mysteries that have logical explanations, as this one has. It is a tall story, to be sure, but it could have happened.
–Isaac Anderson, for The New York Times

The Greatest Books rank: 820


86. Why We Took the Car – Wolfgang Herrndorf (2010)



Also Known As: Tschick

Score:
107.01

Voters:
Krurze (#7)
schaefer.tk (#16)

The most astounding thing is how Wolfgang Herrndorf is able to get onto a level with his heroes, how he speaks their language, even if it’s that of two pubescent teenagers…without it being invasive or embarrassing. The dialogue works because Maik is the compelling young narrator who the author, despite being more knowledgeable and having more life experience, never interferes with. ‘Authentic’ would be the right word, if it didn’t disguise the fact that Herrndorf is a great stylist and a genius with words.
–Die Zeit

The Greatest Books rank: Not Ranked

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Re: AMF Favorite Books Poll: THE RESULTS

Postby Listyguy » Tue Sep 19, 2017 6:52 pm

Tuesday special: a group of 6 books instead of 5, because of a tie! So you'll either get a set of four later today or tomorrow.

85. The Millennium Series – Steig Larsson (2005-2007)



Titles: The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, The Girl Who Played With Fire, The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest
Also Known As: Män som hatar kvinnor

Score:
107.35

Voters:
madzong (#10)
schaefer.tk (#28)
bonnielaurel (#37)

The book takes off, in the fourth chapter: From there, it becomes classic parlor crime fiction with many modern twists…The writing is not beautiful, clipped at times (though that could be the translation by Reg Keeland) and with a few too many falsely dramatic endings to sections or chapters. But it is a compelling, well-woven tale that succeeds in transporting the reader to rural Sweden for a good crime story.
–Marjorie Miller, for The Los Angeles Time

The Greatest Books rank: 1123


84. Madame Bovary – Gustave Flaubert (1856)




Score:
108.91

Voters:
Greg (#6)
schaefer.tk (#35)
bonnielaurel (#60)

Madame Bovary has a perfection that not only stamps it, but that makes it stand almost alone: it holds itself with such a supreme unapproachable assurance as both excites and defies judgment.
–Henry James

The Greatest Books rank: 13


83. Jane Eyre – Charlotte Brontë (1847)



Full Title: Jane Eyre: An Autobiography

Score:
110

Voters:
Chambord (#16)
Listyguy (#29)
schaefer.tk (#42)
Dexter (#50)

Reality – deep, significant reality – is the great characteristic of the book…It reads like a page out of one’s own life; and so do many other pages in the book
–George Henry Lewes, for Fraser’s Magazine

The Greatest Books rank: 46


82. Battle Royale – Koushun Takami (1999)



Also Known As: バトル・ロワイアル

Score:
110.19

Voters:
prosecutorgodot (#1)
Dexter (#98)

The story itself is brilliant. Touted as being extremely controversial, especially for the time it was released, the book opens up all sorts of doors to conversations and thoughts about psychology, murder, survival, love, loyalty, and moral ground.
–David Alderman, for Red Room

The Greatest Books rank: Not Ranked


TIE 80. Midnight’s Children – Salman Rushdie (1981)




Score:
110.28

Voters:
DocBrown (#9)
DaveC (#11)

What this fiction has been missing is a different kind of ambition, something just a little coarse, a hunger to swallow India whole and spit it out. It needed a touch of Saul Bellow's Augie March brashness, Bombay rather than Chicago-born, and going at things in its own special Bombay way. Now, in ''Midnight's Children,'' Salman Rushdie has realized that ambition.
–Clark Blaise, for The New York Times

The Greatest Books rank: 64


TIE 80. Snow Crash – Neal Stephenson (1992)




Score:
110.28

Voters:
DaveC (#9)
Nick (#11)

The body that is infected by a virus does not become infected because it understands the virus any more than the body that does not become infected misunderstands the virus. So a world in which everything—from bitmaps to blood—can be understood as a "form of speech" is also a world in which nothing actually is understood, a world in which what a speech act does is disconnected from what it means.
–Walter Benn Michaels

The Greatest Books rank: 471

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Re: AMF Favorite Books Poll: THE RESULTS

Postby Listyguy » Thu Sep 21, 2017 11:47 pm

79. American Gods – Neil Gaiman (2001)




Score:
110.54

Voters:
antonius (#7)
whuntva (#14)

There's something raw about American Gods, too. It's a polished piece of writing, no doubt about that, but it has that simultaneous urgency and sprawl of a writer finding their feet.
–David Barnett, for The Guardian

The Greatest Books rank: 1040


78. The Makioka Sisters – Jun'ichirō Tanizaki (1948)



Also Known As: 細雪
Also Known As: Sasameyuki

Score:
111.46

Voters:
Petri (#1)
Dexter (#86)

The Makioka Sisters is not simply a masterpiece. It also happens to be a particularly aberrant masterpiece because it revolves around arranged marriage — a subject usually shunned in modern novels. “Arranged marriage” sounds unromantic. Moreover, in English and in other Western languages, the term inevitably evokes certain misgivings.
–Minae Mizumura, for The Huffington Post

The Greatest Books rank: 282


77. The Idiot – Fyodor Dostoevsky (1869)



Also Known As: Idiot

Score:
112.56

Voters:
Krurze (#14)
Chambord (#33)
DaveC (#37)
Greg (#52)

The central idea of The Idiot as we have it was, as Dostoevsky wrote in a letter, "to depict a completely beautiful human being".
–A.S. Byatt, for The Guardian

The Greatest Books rank: 63


76. If on a winter’s night a traveler – Italo Calvino (1979)



Also Known As: Se una notte d'inverno un viaggiatore

Score:
112.82

Voters:
Miguel (#2)
Dexter (#42)

If on a winter’s night a traveler distils into a single volume what is perhaps the dominant characteristic of Calvino’s entire output: his protean, metamorphic genius for never doing the same thing twice. In the space of 260 pages, we are given the beginnings of no fewer than ten novels.
-Salman Rushdie

The Greatest Books rank: 205


We'll have another group of five coming up shortly!

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Re: AMF Favorite Books Poll: THE RESULTS

Postby Listyguy » Fri Sep 22, 2017 12:47 am

This group will give you a double dose of "future Jack Nicholson movies"

75. The Plague – Albert Camus (1947)



Also Known As: La Peste

Score:
113.75

Voters:
Krurze (#1)
Petri (#70)

Camus’s insistence on placing individual moral responsibility at the heart of all public choices cuts sharply across the comfortable habits of our own age. His definition of heroism—ordinary people doing extraordinary things out of simple decency—rings truer than we might once have acknowledged.
–Tony Judt, for New York Review of Books

The Greatest Books rank: 128


74. One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest – Ken Kesey (1962)




Score:
115.46

Voters:
prosecutorgodot (#8)
DocBrown (#25)
Dexter (#38)

Remember that these days fell smack between the Beatniks and the hippies, a transition time in so many cultural areas—civil rights, social rights, science, music, theater, painting. History would show this hinge point of the 1950s actually served as staging area for the great collective nervous breakdown of society called The 60s. And here, at the edge of the great convulsion, our own U.S. government paid smart young men to take LSD and psilocybin and other hallucinogens to study their effects. Those effects translated directly into the fiction of Ken Kesey.
–Charles McNair, for Paste

The Greatest Books rank: 165


73. The Shining – Stephen King (1977)




Score:
116.30

Voters:
ordinaryperson (#4)
prosecutorgodot (#39)
madzong (#62)

In the novel, as in so many of King's early classics, location is all. The Overlook Hotel itself is alive; huge and vacant, with secrets hidden everywhere. Haunted bathrooms, the echoing memories of debauched parties, a topiary animal garden that seems to come to life, wasps' nests that feature a never-ending stream of hostile insects. The hotel wears its malevolence on its sleeve.
–James Smythe, for The Guardian

The Greatest Books rank: 671


72. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time – Mark Haddon (2003)




Score:
116.51

Voters:
madzong (#4)
DaveC (#31)
bonnielaurel (#89)

Mark Haddon's stark, funny and original first novel, The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, is presented as a detective story. But it eschews most of the furnishings of high-literary enterprise as well as the conventions of genre, disorienting and reorienting the reader to devastating effect.
–Jay McInerney

The Greatest Books rank: 1554


71. On the Road – Jack Kerouac (1957)




Score:
116.91

Voters:
Dexter (#11)
Nick (#28)
madzong (#46)
antonius (#59)

It changed my life like it changed everyone else's
–Bob Dylan

The Greatest Books rank: 108

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Re: AMF Favorite Books Poll: THE RESULTS

Postby Listyguy » Fri Sep 22, 2017 7:49 pm

70. A Christmas Carol – Charles Dickens (1843)



Full Title: A Christmas Carol. In Prose. Being a Ghost Story of Christmas

Score:
117.25

Voters:
whuntva (#2)
DocBrown (#33)

[A Christmas Carol is a] national benefit and to every man or woman who reads it, a personal kindness. The last two people I heard speak of it were women; neither knew the other, or the author, and both said, by way of criticism, 'God bless him!'
–William Makepeace Thackeray

The Greatest Books rank: 367


69. A Canticle For Leibowitz – Walter M. Miller Jr. (1960)




Score:
118.03

Voters:
DocBrown (#1)
DaveC (#51)

A Canticle for Leibowitz was one of the first novels to escape from the science-fiction ghetto and become a staple of high-school reading lists. Its legacy can be seen in the works of Gene Wolfe, Margaret Atwood, and many other speculative-fiction authors who came after him, as well as in the current flood of end-of-the-world novels, TV shows, and movies.
–Jon Michaud, for The New Yorker

The Greatest Books rank: 803


68. Hamlet – William Shakespeare (1600)



Full Title: The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark

Score:
121.89

Voters:
ordinaryperson (#9)
Listyguy (#15)
bonnielaurel (#45)

There is the story of the woman who read Hamlet for the first time and said, "I don't see why people admire that play so. It is nothing but a bunch of quotations strung together."
–Isaac Asimov

The Greatest Books rank: 8


67. The Unbearable Lightness of Being – Milan Kundera (1984)



Also Known As: Nesnesitelná lehkost bytí

Score:
122.85

Voters:
Petri (#10)
DaveC (#33)
antonius (#55)
bonnielaurel (#65)
Greg (#93)

The mind Mr. Kundera puts on display is truly formidable, and the subject of its concern is substantively alarming. But, given this subject, why are we forced to wonder, as we read, where his crisis of faith locates itself, in the world or in his art?
–E.L. Doctorow, for The New York Times

The Greatest Books rank: 199


66. The Old Man and the Sea – Ernest Hemingway (1952)




Score:
127.87

Voters:
Listyguy (#28)
Nick (#35)
whuntva (#38)
bonnielaurel (#42)
Gillingham (#47)
Dexter (#89)

The Old Man and the Sea is a beautiful tale, awash in the seasalt and sweat, bait and beer of the Havana coast. It tells a fundamental human truth: in a volatile world, from our first breath to our last wish, through triumphs and pitfalls both trivial and profound, what sustains us, ultimately, is hope.
–Russell Cunningham, for The Guardian

The Greatest Books rank: 71

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Re: AMF Favorite Books Poll: THE RESULTS

Postby Listyguy » Sat Sep 23, 2017 5:42 pm

65. Atomised – Michel Houellebecq (1998)



Also Known As: The Elementary Particles
Also Known As: Les Particules élémentaires

Score:
133.33

Voters:
Michel (#1)
Gillingham (#23)

[The novel] arrives from Europe trailing a reputation as a succes de scandale -- as France's greatest literary phenomenon since Camus. It has stormed the best-seller lists in its native land and attracted much attention in the Netherlands and Germany, while no less a luminary than Julian Barnes has called it ''a novel which hunts big game while others settle for shooting rabbit.''
–Anthony Quinn, for The New York Times

The Greatest Books rank: 1529


64. Hunger – Knut Hamsun (1890)



Also Known As: Sult

Score:
136.85

Voters:
Chambord (#5)
Michel (#19)
bonnielaurel (#33)

I also like the paradox of reading it now: that Hamsun was expressing a sense of acute isolation, both his protagonist's and his own, yet Hunger was his breakthrough work. As soon as it was published, Hamsun became a stranger to the life of hopeful desperation he so beautifully described.
–Joanna Kavenna, for The Independent

The Greatest Books rank: 125


63. Ulysses – James Joyce (1922)




Score:
139.05

Voters:
antonius (#9)
Nick (#13)
bonnielaurel (#23)

I hold this book to be the most important expression which the present age has found; it is a book to which we are all indebted, and from which none of us can escape
–T.S. Eliot

The Greatest Books rank: 3


62. Tess of the d’Urbervilles – Thomas Hardy (1891)



Full Title: Tess of the d'Urbervilles: A Pure Woman Faithfully Presented

Score:
139.37

Voters:
bonnielaurel (#5)
Greg (#21)
DaveC(#26)

Thomas Hardy acknowledged that he had written the book 'with too much feeling to recall it with pleasure'. If writing the book was an affecting experience, reading it proves equally so.
–Elizabeth Day, for The Guardian

The Greatest Books rank: 104


61. Portnoy’s Complaint – Philip Roth (1969)




Score:
139.54

Voters:
Michel (#9)
DaveC (#15)
Gillingham (#32)
Miguel (#86)

The novel transcends its own vulgarity – placing it beyond easy dismissals as mere literary porn – by using sex to explore pretty much everything else: history, culture, identity, religion, politics.
–Chris Cox, for The Guadian

The Greatest Books rank: 430

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Re: AMF Favorite Books Poll: THE RESULTS

Postby antonius » Sat Sep 23, 2017 7:32 pm

Very surprised that Ulysses is so low.

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Re: AMF Favorite Books Poll: THE RESULTS

Postby Listyguy » Sat Sep 23, 2017 7:46 pm

antonius wrote:Very surprised that Ulysses is so low.


Agreed. I think this was discussed at some point during this process, but the sheer length of the novel ultimately has kept a lot of our voters from having read it (myself included-I'm reading it now actually).

That's definitely one of the shortcomings of this poll, in my opinion. It's pretty easy to listen to 200 albums in three months for an albums polls, but you'd be lucky to read 10 books in that span of time (especially if one of them is a behemoth like Ulysses).

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Re: AMF Favorite Books Poll: THE RESULTS

Postby Gillingham » Sun Sep 24, 2017 8:56 pm

Then again, I assume most participants in these all-time greatest polls (albums, novels, films etc.) have already heard/read/seen quite some works before the poll starts and only get to know a couple of more works (and do some re-lostening/reading/watching) to make the lists.

For me, when it comes to Ulysses, I've bought the book years ago and started reading it, when after a couple of pages in I concluded that I needed to read much more before I could begin to appreciate that work for what it is. Yes, the work is long, but what is daunting to me is the cultural weight of the book and the myriad of references to other works I may or may not be familiar with. I then decided to read A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man first (which I didn't like to be honest), because it was much less dense and (self)refferential and I thought I needed to read it anyway to better understand Joyce and his later works.
I'll get to Ulysses when I feel like it. For now my to-read-list is very long anyway.

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Re: AMF Favorite Books Poll: THE RESULTS

Postby Listyguy » Mon Sep 25, 2017 5:32 pm

60. The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes – Arthur Conan Doyle (1892)




Score:
140.16

Voters:
prosectuorgodot (#10)
Michel (#14)
bonnielaurel (#31)
Miguel (#78)

Sherlock Holmes is the world's only consulting detective. Money and prestige don't interest him, simply the chance to flex his intellectual muscles and practise his unique method of deduction are enough.
The Guardian

The Greatest Books rank: 171


59. Chronicle of a Death Foretold – Gabriel Garcia Marquez (1981)



Also Known As: Crónica de una muerte anunciada

Score:
143.70

Voters:
DaveC (#2)
Miguel (#42)
bonnielaurel (#53)
antonius (#72)

The descriptions are sometimes gluttonously graphic (the dogs), sometimes quite disgusting (Santiago Nasar walks about bleeding with his bowels in his hands), and, in one telling, a strangely beautiful lyricism appears: ''Then they both kept on knifing him against the door with alternate and easy stabs, floating in the dazzling backwater they had found on the other side of fear.''
–Leonard Michaels, for New York Times

The Greatest Books rank: 1237


58. The Sound and the Fury – William Faulkner (1929)




Score:
143.81

Voters:
Listyguy (#17)
Gillingham (#18)
prosecutorgodot (#24)
Chambord (#25)

It's a real son-of-a-bitch … This one's the greatest I'll ever write.
–William Faulkner

The Greatest Books rank: 18


57. The Grapes of Wrath – John Steinbeck (1939)




Score:
145.49

Voters:
schaefer.tk (#21)
bonnielaurel (#22)
Listyguy (#31)
Nick (#44)
Greg (#61)
DaveC (#75)

The real truth is that Steinbeck has written a novel from the depths of his heart with a sincerity seldom equaled. It may be an exaggeration, but it is the exaggeration of an honest and splendid writer.
–Peter Monro Jack, for New York Times

The Greatest Books rank: 34


56. The New York Trilogy – Paul Auster (1985-1986)



Titles: City of Glass, Ghosts, The Locked Room

Score:
146.67

Voters:
Michel (#10)
Petri (#11)
Miguel (#18)

The city of the title is New York, the only truly constant character in the book, and it is the fate of this city to be walked through and interpreted by the writer Quinn and the philosopher and former convict Stillman.
–Toby Olson, for New York Times

The Greatest Books rank: 785

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Re: AMF Favorite Books Poll: THE RESULTS

Postby Nick » Thu Sep 28, 2017 12:45 am

Liking the rollout so far! Any chance we'll get another batch soon?

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Re: AMF Favorite Books Poll: THE RESULTS

Postby Listyguy » Thu Sep 28, 2017 4:10 am

Nick wrote:Liking the rollout so far! Any chance we'll get another batch soon?

Here's our next batch! These results are taking me way too long to get out, but I'm hoping to speed it up for the top 50 (but I make no promises)

55. Journey to the End of the Night – Louis-Ferdinand Céline (1932)



Also Known As: Voyage au bout de la nuit

Score:
147.26

Voters:
Greg (#3)
antonius (#15)
bonnielaurel (#49)

Céline showed me that it was possible to convey things that had heretofore seemed inaccessible. Specifically, he showed how to yoke the equine demands of the body to the golden cart of fantasy, to create a form of dirty magic realism.
-Will Self, for New York Times

The Greatest Books rank: 95


54. Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy – John le Carré (1974)




Score:
149.86

Voters:
DocBrown (#8)
Gillingham (#10)
Chambord (#45)
bonnielaurel (#70)

There are those who read crime and espionage books for the plot and those who read them for the atmosphere; the former talk of "ingenious puzzles" and take pride in "pure ratiocination"; the latter think themselves more literary, worry about style and characterization, and tend to praise their favorite writers as "real novelists." Le Carré's books -- like those of the six authors just mentioned -- offer plenty for both kinds of readers.
-Richard Locke, for New York Times

The Greatest Books rank: 543


53. American Psycho – Bret Easton Ellis (1991)




Score:
152.11

Voters:
Michel (#4)
Dexter (#23)
Nick (#27)
antonius (#95)

But then I was not trying to add members to my fan club. You do not write a novel for praise, or thinking of your audience. You write for yourself; you work out between you and your pen the things that intrigue you.
-Bret Easton Ellis, on the backlash the novel received when it was first released

The Greatest Books rank: 557


52. Ficciones/Labyrinths – Jorge Luis Borges (1941/1962)




Score:
153.37

Voters:
Miguel (#3)
Nick (#6)

[Borges] never compromised himself by writing a novel but instead left a whole library of delicately structured maze-like speculations.
v-Jake Arnott, for The Independent

The Greatest Books rank: 57


51. Les Misérables – Victor Hugo (1862)




Score:
153.73

Voters:
Chambord (#4)
bonnielaurel (#10)
Greg (#42)

The novel of the century
-David Bellos

The Greatest Books rank: 55

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Re: AMF Favorite Books Poll: THE RESULTS

Postby Listyguy » Thu Sep 28, 2017 8:14 pm

50. The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle – Haruki Murakami (1994)



Also Known As: ねじまき鳥クロニクル

Score:
155.02

Voters:
Dexter (#6)
schaefer.tk (#30)
DocBrown (#31)
Chambord (#47)
DaveC (#77)

As it floats to its conclusion, ''The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle'' includes an almost Joycean range of literary forms: flashbacks, dreams, letters, newspaper stories and transcripts of Internet chats. And no matter how fantastical the events it describes may be, the straight-ahead storytelling never loses its propulsive force.
–Jamie James, for New York Times

The Greatest Books rank: 166


49. Frankenstein – Mary Shelley (1818)



Full Title: Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus

Score:
156.73

Voters:
schaefer.tk (#5)
Listyguy (#21)
Miguel (#43)
Petri (#64)
Greg (#80)

Shelley was able to observe the conflict inside herself between wanting to create a story and the fear of writing something useless and horrible. Ultimately, she created an iconic image for a writer's fear of the story she is producing.
–Meike Ziervogel, for The Independent

The Greatest Books rank: 78


48. Disgrace – J.M. Coetzee (1999)




Score:
157.93

Voters:
Gillingham (#3)
antonius (#17)
schaefer.tk (#40)
DaveC (#94)

[Any] novel set in post-apartheid South Africa is fated to be read as a political portrait, but the fascination of Disgrace is the way it both encourages and contests such a reading by holding extreme alternatives in tension. Salvation, ruin.
–Adam Mars-Jones, for the Guardian

The Greatest Books rank: 660


47. Cloud Atlas – David Mitchell (2004)




Score:
158.77

Voters:
whuntva (#9)
DocBrown (#27)
bonnielaurel (#28)
antonius (#28)
Dexter (#73)

David Mitchell has taken six wildly different stories ... and melded them into one fantastic and complex work.
–Keily Oakes, for BBC

The Greatest Books rank: 419


46. Under the Volcano – Malcolm Lowry (1947)




Score:
159.55

Voters:
Greg (#2)
schaefer.tk (#31)
DocBrown (#32)
antonius (#64)

The puzzle the book presents has been unlocked many times over the years, but, as is the case with all great works of art, Volcano inspires and absorbs legion interpretations. It can be read as an overtly political, religious, mystical or philosophical novel. It is about damnation, or fascism, or love. It is a tragedy and, at times, a comedy (its flashes of humour are too often ignored).
–Chris Power, for The Guardian

The Greatest Books rank: 94

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Re: AMF Favorite Books Poll: THE RESULTS

Postby antonius » Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:31 am

One book that I didn't expect: Frankenstein. Never read it, as there are too many films about the subject. I suppose that the original book has something more to say than what is already said in all those movies?

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Re: AMF Favorite Books Poll: THE RESULTS

Postby Listyguy » Fri Sep 29, 2017 11:10 pm

45. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd – Agatha Christie (1926)




Score:
172.57

Voters:
bonnielaurel (#4)
madzong (#12)
Michel (#15)

Despite my familiarity with the story, and its famous twist, it was the most engrossing book I’ve read so far. The mystery works just as well if you know the secrets or don’t.
–Luke McGrath, for Huffington Post

The Greatest Books rank: 1473


44. Great Expectations – Charles Dickens (1861)




Score:
173.56

Voters:
bonnielaurel (#11)
Chambord (#17)
whuntva (#18)
prosecutorgodot (#42)
schaefer.tk (#45)

[Not being to the point is] hardly an accusation that could be levelled against Great Expectations. If some of Dickens's novels sprawl luxuriously across the page, this one is as trim as a whippet.
–Robert Douglas-Fairhurst, for The Guardian

The Greatest Books rank: 23


43. Blood Meridian – Cormac McCarthy (1985)



Full Title: Blood Meridian or the Evening Redness in the West

Score:
174.66

Voters:
Gillingham (#1)
Greg (#16)
Nick (#24)

In the entire range of American literature, only Moby-Dick bears comparison to Blood Meridian. Both are epic in scope, cosmically resonant, obsessed with open space and with language, exploring vast uncharted distances with a fanatically patient minuteness. Both manifest a sublime visionary power that is matched only by still more ferocious irony. Both savagely explode the American dream of manifest destiny (sic) of racial domination and endless imperial expansion. But if anything, McCarthy writes with a yet more terrible clarity than does Melville.


The Greatest Books rank: 169


42. The Bell Jar – Sylvia Plath (1963)




Score:
180.16

Voters:
schaefer.tk (#8)
Chambord (#8)
Listyguy (#27)
Nick (#29)

The Bell Jar is so carefully constructed and considered. Despite the messy tangle of subject matter, Plath never rambles; and for all it's flowery and poetic language there is not an unconsidered word in the entire book.
–Kirsty Grocott, for The Telegraph

The Greatest Books rank: 412


41. The Great Gatsby – F. Scoot Fitzgerald (1925)




Score:
181.28

Voters:
Listyguy (#3)
Chambord (#22)
Nick (#30)
Dexter (#40)
DaveC (#76)

With sensitive insight and keen psychological observation, Fitzgerald discloses in these people a meanness of spirit, carelessness and absence of loyalties. He cannot hate them, for they are dumb in their insensate selfishness, and only to be pitied. The philosopher of the flapper has escaped the mordant, but he has turned grave.
–Edwin Clark, for New York Times

The Greatest Books rank: 10

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Re: AMF Favorite Books Poll: THE RESULTS

Postby prosecutorgodot » Sat Sep 30, 2017 7:01 am

Interesting little quickie review of The Great Gatsby right there. Never understood the acclaim of the book, but that review helps me see that side a bit more clearly.

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Re: AMF Favorite Books Poll: THE RESULTS

Postby Listyguy » Sat Sep 30, 2017 3:53 pm

40. The Sun Also Rises – Ernest Hemingway (1926)




Score:
188.67

Voters:
Dexter (#1)
Chambord (#23)
Listyguy (#25)
DocBrown (#36)

No amount of analysis can convey the quality of The Sun Also Rises. It is a truly gripping story, told in a lean, hard, athletic narrative prose that puts more literary English to shame.
New York Times

The Greatest Books rank: 61


39. The Master and Margarita – Mikhail Bulgakov (1967)



Also Known As: Ма́стер и Маргари́та

Score:
190.38

Voters:
antonius (#2)
Petri (#2)
Greg (#68)

The Master and Margarita is one of those novels that, even in translation, make you feel that not one word could have been written differently. I’ve read it half a dozen times now, in three translations and in the original, and its mystery has only increased.
–Boris Fishman, for New York Times

The Greatest Books rank: 119


38. Neuromancer – William Gibson (1984)




Score:
197.03

Voters:
ordinaryperson (#6)
DocBrown (#18)
Dexter (#35)
antonius (#35)
DaveC (#38)
Greg (#54)

But the novel is not much interested in character and plot. Instead it is dedicated to creating the feeling of a transformed reality, where a new vocabulary is required to describe how perception itself has been changed by computers.
–John Mullan, for The Guardian

The Greatest Books rank: 533


37. Perfume – Patrick Süskind (1985)



Full Title: Perfume: The Story of a Murder
Also Known As: Das Parfum
Score:
203.49

Voters:
Miguel (#9)
Krurze (#11)
antonius (#25)
Chambord (#46)
Michel (#46)
Dexter (#78)
bonnielaurel (#100)

[The] novel is a book of smells - the odors of history, in fact - and on the first page 18th-century Paris is anatomized into its component stinks. In its most fetid spot, beside a mephitic cemetery and beneath a fish stall, the hero of Perfume, Jean-Baptiste Grenouille, is born. But the point, the miraculous point, is that he has no smell at all.
–Peter Ackroyd, for New York Times

The Greatest Books rank: 602


36. One Hundred Years of Solitude – Gabriel Garcia Marquez (1967)



Also Known As: Cien años de soledad

Score:
204.60

Voters:
antonius (#1)[/i]
Listyguy (#11)
Dexter (#48)
DaveC (#48)
Greg (#67)

One Hundred Years of Solitude is the first piece of literature since the Book of Genesisthat should be required reading for the entire human race. Mr. García Márquez has done nothing less than to create in the reader a sense of all that is profound, meaningful, and meaningless in life.
–William Kennedy, for New York Times

[b]The Greatest Books rank:
12

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Re: AMF Favorite Books Poll: THE RESULTS

Postby Dexter » Sun Oct 01, 2017 9:27 am

Very well-done presentation so far. Thanks! Great to some unfamiliar books for me to look into.

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Re: AMF Favorite Books Poll: THE RESULTS

Postby Listyguy » Sun Oct 01, 2017 7:14 pm

35. Steppenwolf – Hermann Hesse (1927)



Also Known As: Der Steppenwolf

Score:
207.87

Voters:
Petri (#2)
Krurze (#24)
Chambord (#24)
schaefer.tk (#34)
DaveC (#62)
bonnielaurel (#88)

With its generous helpings of sex and drugs, its darkly romantic urban isolation and savage attacks on bourgeois life, it's no surprise that Hermann Hesse's 10th novel received mixed reviews when first published in 1927 – or that it became a countercultural classic in the 1960s.
–Chris Cox, for The Guardian

The Greatest Books rank: 131


34. High Fidelity – Nick Hornby (1995)




Score:
210.19

Voters:
madzong (#2)
StevieFan13 (#9)
Michel (#47)
schaefer.tk (#60)
Petri (#73)
Dexter (#79)

Reading High Fidelity is like listening to a great single. You know it's wonderful from the minute it goes on, and as soon as it's over, you want to hear it again because it makes you feel young, and grown-up, and puts a stupid grin on your face all at the same time. If this book was a record, we would be calling it an instant classic. Because that's what it is.
–Suzanne Moore, for The Guardian

The Greatest Books rank: 792


33. Wuthering Heights – Emily Brontë (1847)




Score:
216.72

Voters:
bonnielaurel (#6)
Listyguy (#8)
Krurze (#15)
Greg (#32)
Dexter (#56)

We know nothing in the whole range of our fictitious literature which presents such shocking pictures of the worst forms of humanity. There is not in the entire dramatis persona, a single character which is not utterly hateful or thoroughly contemptible ... Even the female characters excite something of loathing and much of contempt. Beautiful and loveable in their childhood, they all, to use a vulgar expression, "turn out badly"
The Atlaz

The Greatest Books rank: 17


32. Ender’s Game – Orson Scott Card (1985)




Score:
221.32

Voters:
Styrofoam Boots (#3)
Dexter (#7)
DaveC (#8)
antonius (#91)

I am aware that this sounds like the synopsis of a grade Z, made-for-television, science-fiction-rip-off movie. But Mr. Card has shaped this unpromising material into an affecting novel full of surprises that seem inevitable once they are explained. The key, of course, is Ender Wiggin himself. Mr. Card never makes the mistake of patronizing or sentimentalizing his hero. Alternately likable and insufferable, he is a convincing little Napoleon in short pants.
–Gerald Jones, for New York Times

The Greatest Books rank: 1439


31. Anna Karenina – Leo Tolstoy (1877)



Also Known As: Анна Каренина

Score:
221.98

Voters:
schaefer.tk (#6)
Chambord (#13)
bonnielaurel (#17)
DocBrown (#34)
Greg (#34)
DaveC (#65)

It is more admired than learned from. Anna Karenina couldn't be less like a conventional modern novel. Instead of a barrage of metaphors describing things in terms of other things that they resemble, Lev Tolstoy seeks the precise word for the thing itself. Instead of the solipsistic modern mode of events being experienced from the point of view of a single character, Tolstoy slips in and out of the consciousness of dozens of characters, major and minor.
–James Meek, for The Guardian

The Greatest Books rank: 24

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Re: AMF Favorite Books Poll: THE RESULTS

Postby madzong » Mon Oct 02, 2017 7:41 am

Looking forward to finding out what the top 30 are!

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Re: AMF Favorite Books Poll: THE RESULTS

Postby Listyguy » Mon Oct 02, 2017 6:16 pm

I'm glad you all are enjoying the results! Unfortunately I probably won't have time to do any more results until like Wednesday evening. However, I'm most likely going to drop 10 per day from that point on.

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Re: AMF Favorite Books Poll: THE RESULTS

Postby Listyguy » Wed Oct 04, 2017 9:24 pm

30. A Tale of Two Cities – Charles Dickens (1859)




Score:
224.74

Voters:
bonnielaurel (#2)
whuntva (#7)
schaefer.tk (#9)
Dexter (#95)

Epic in historical scale, it is also an intimate book, showing how the personal and political intermingle and what the causes and effects of violence are, including the struggle to retain one's sanity under systemic abuse.
–Anita Sethi, for The Guardian

The Greatest Books rank: 225


29. Never Let Me Go – Kazou Ishiguro (2005)




Score:
230.08

Voters:
DaveC (#1)
Dexter (#9)
ordinaryperson (#10)
Miguel (#54)

Ishiguro's imagining of the children's misshapen little world is profoundly thoughtful, and their hesitant progression into knowledge of their plight is an extreme and heartbreaking version of the exodus of all children from the innocence in which the benevolent but fraudulent adult world conspires to place them.
–Joseph O’Neil, for The Atlantic

The Greatest Books rank: 340


28. Infinite Jest – David Foster Wallace (1996)



Full Title:
Also Known As:
Score:
231.13

Voters:
Nick (#1)
DocBrown (#5)
whuntva (#16)
Dexter (#61)

At more than 1,000 pages – with copious footnotes – Infinite Jest is a famously difficult read. It is the Gen-X Ulysses that even those like me, who consider themselves DFW superfans, are nervous to attempt, many preferring to feed their devotion with his essays and short stories.
–Emma-Lee Moss, for The Guardian

The Greatest Books rank: 341


27. His Dark Materials Series – Philip Pullman (1995-2000)



Titles: Northern Lights (aka The Golden Compass), The Subtle Knife, The Amber Spyglass

Score:
233.62

Voters:
antonius (#6)
prosecutorgodot (#7)
Styrofoam Boots (#10)
Dexter (#31)
Mmdzong (#50)

You’re going to bawl your eyes out, no matter how many times you’ve read it, and you’ll never look at a hare or a polar bear the same way again.
–Abigail Chandler, for The Guardian

The Greatest Books rank: 455 (This represents the highest ranking book from the series)


26. A Clockwork Orange – Anthony Burgess (1962)




Score:
239.97

Voters:
madzong (#5)
DocBrown (#10)
Gillingham (#14)
Listyguy (#22)
Dexter (#25)

“A Clockwork Orange” is in essence a black comedy. Confronted by evil, comedy feels no need to punish or correct. It answers with corrosive laughter.
-Martin Amis, for New York Times

The Greatest Books rank: 138
Last edited by Listyguy on Thu Oct 05, 2017 12:07 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: AMF Favorite Books Poll: THE RESULTS

Postby Listyguy » Wed Oct 04, 2017 9:25 pm

There will be five more coming up in a few hours!

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Re: AMF Favorite Books Poll: THE RESULTS

Postby Styrofoam Boots » Wed Oct 04, 2017 11:53 pm

You have the author of the His Dark Materials series listed as The Queen is Dead. Great rollout so far!

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Re: AMF Favorite Books Poll: THE RESULTS

Postby Bruno » Wed Oct 04, 2017 11:58 pm

Nice rollout!!

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Re: AMF Favorite Books Poll: THE RESULTS

Postby Listyguy » Thu Oct 05, 2017 12:06 am

Styrofoam Boots wrote:You have the author of the His Dark Materials series listed as The Queen is Dead. Great rollout so far!

Wow, thanks for catching that.

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Re: AMF Favorite Books Poll: THE RESULTS

Postby DaveC » Thu Oct 05, 2017 1:20 am

Listyguy wrote: 28. Infinite Jest – David Foster Wallace (1996)



Full Title:
Also Known As:
Score:
231.13

Voters:
Nick (#1)
DocBrown (#5)
whuntva (#16)
Dexter (#61)

At more than 1,000 pages – with copious footnotes – Infinite Jest is a famously difficult read. It is the Gen-X Ulysses that even those like me, who consider themselves DFW superfans, are nervous to attempt, many preferring to feed their devotion with his essays and short stories.
–Emma-Lee Moss, for The Guardian

The Greatest Books rank: 341



Don't be mislead by that review. This is not Ulysses or Naked Lunch. Easier to read than Pynchon indeed. Aside from the length I suspect that what bothers some folk is DFWs extensive vocabulary (complete with neologisms that you can't just look up in the dictionary). If you are not disturbed by 'big words' give it a go. (And especially if you are a fan of Neal Stephenson.)

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Re: AMF Favorite Books Poll: THE RESULTS

Postby Listyguy » Thu Oct 05, 2017 5:14 am

25. The Stranger – Albert Camus (1942)



Also Known As: L'Etranger, The Outsider

Score:
241.80

Voters:
Krurze (#3)
schaefer.tk (#18)
antonius (#21)
Petri (#30)
Listyguy (#36)
Miguel (#45)
Dexter (#90)

On the surface, [the novel] gives the appearance of being an extremely simple though carefully planned and written book. In reality, it is a dense and rich creation, full of undiscovered meanings and formal qualities. It would take a book at least the length of the novel to make a complete analysis of meaning and form and the correspondences of meaning and form, in [the novel]
–Carl Viggiani

The Greatest Books rank: 32


24. Fahrenheit 451 – Ray Bradbury (1953)




Score:
246.25

Voters:
Listyguy (#5)
Styrofoam Boots (#7)
Miguel (#11)
Dexter (#15)
DaveC (#83)

To the end of his life, Bradbury seemed surprised that he had to keep explaining that the novel was not about the dangers of government censorship or authoritarian rule; as he told his biographer Sam Weller, “ Fahrenheit 451 is less about Big Brother and more about Little Sister.”
–Dave Itzkoff, for new York Times

The Greatest Books rank: 242


23. Lolita – Vladimir Nabokov (1955)




Score:
250.97

Voters:
Michel (#5)
Listyguy (#9)
bonnielaurel (#12)
schaefer.tk (#24)
Nick (#46)
Dexter (#52)

This is still one of the funniest and one of the saddest books that will be published this year. As for its pornographic content, I can think of few volumes more likely to quench the flames of lust than this exact and immediate description of its consequences.
–Elizabeth Janeway, for New York Times

The Greatest Books rank: 19


22. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn – Mark Twain (1884)




Score:
256.83

Voters:
Gillingham (#4)
Nick (#19)
whuntva (#21)
prosecutorgodot (#23)
Dexter (#24)
Greg (#33)
Petri (#71)

All modern literature comes from one book by Mark Twain called Huckleberry Finn… It's the best book we've had. All American writing comes from that. There was nothing before. There has been nothing as good since.
–Ernest Hemingway

The Greatest Books rank: 9


21. Catch-22 – Joseph Heller (1961)




Score:
261.87

Voters:
Nick (#2)
Dexter (#12)
Listyguy (#12)
antonius (#34)
DaveC (#35)
prosecutorgodor (#43)

The power of Catch-22, for me, is the way in which it plunges into that emptiness at the end of the novel, when the source of its comedy is finally revealed. Throughout, the novel's comic surface has been punctured by shards of Yossarian's traumatic memories of a bombing raid in which a young, enlisted solider bled to death from flak wounds.
–Chris Cox, for The Guardian

The Greatest Books rank: 35

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Re: AMF Favorite Books Poll: THE RESULTS

Postby Listyguy » Thu Oct 05, 2017 5:16 am

Two notes:
1- It is really hard to find a cover of Lolita that isn't creepy/provocative looking. Which I guess is meant to promote the notoriety around the book, but come on.
2- Catch-22 was five points away from finishing 22nd (instead of 21 where it ended up).

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Re: AMF Favorite Books Poll: THE RESULTS

Postby prosecutorgodot » Thu Oct 05, 2017 5:58 am

Looking good, Listyguy!

I want to read Lolita, but it might be a while before I get around to it.

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Re: AMF Favorite Books Poll: THE RESULTS

Postby Dexter » Thu Oct 05, 2017 7:28 am

Listyguy wrote:It is really hard to find a cover of Lolita that isn't creepy/provocative looking. Which I guess is meant to promote the notoriety around the book, but come on.

I actually own the book with the cover you selected. It still turned around some heads when I tried to read it beachside lol.

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Re: AMF Favorite Books Poll: THE RESULTS

Postby Petri » Thu Oct 05, 2017 7:40 am

Great show Listyguy! I made a library-list containing all the novels in top 50 I have not read yet.

I checked what's left (I didn’t count the points but just checked which books had at least two high votes). Surprisingly I got 21 books. It seems that you have missed Maus by Art Spiegelmann (StevieFan13’s #8, Dexter’s #73 and #14 of mine). Not a top 20 material (it would be fun if Catch ’22 had been #22) but definitely enough for top 100. Or was Maus somehow ineligible?

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Re: AMF Favorite Books Poll: THE RESULTS

Postby veganvalentine » Thu Oct 05, 2017 7:52 am

prosecutorgodot wrote:Interesting little quickie review of The Great Gatsby right there. Never understood the acclaim of the book, but that review helps me see that side a bit more clearly.


I didn't understand the acclaim when I read it in high school, but when I re-read it ten years later it struck me as a great work. There's something about the mystery of Gatsby and his tragic, fruitless quest for a love that no longer exists that really stuck with me.

I'll have to catch up on my reading so I can participate in this poll next time around, but it's great to see classics like The Grapes of Wrath and The Sun Also Rises. This isn't a deep insight, but seeing the title The Sun Also Rises reminds me that the amount of alcohol the characters drink is simply astounding (and contributes to the atmosphere that blurb spoke of).
Last edited by veganvalentine on Thu Oct 05, 2017 7:01 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: AMF Favorite Books Poll: THE RESULTS

Postby bonnielaurel » Thu Oct 05, 2017 8:06 am

antonius wrote:One book that I didn't expect: Frankenstein. Never read it, as there are too many films about the subject. I suppose that the original book has something more to say than what is already said in all those movies?


The book focuses more on the religious aspect: man trying to play God and create by himself. The films are more about the horror.

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Re: AMF Favorite Books Poll: THE RESULTS

Postby Nick » Thu Oct 05, 2017 11:33 am

Congratulations to the author of our #29 book, Kazuo Ishiguro! Just this morning Ishiguro won the Nobel Prize in Literature.

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Re: AMF Favorite Books Poll: THE RESULTS

Postby Listyguy » Thu Oct 05, 2017 12:21 pm

Petri wrote:Great show Listyguy! I made a library-list containing all the novels in top 50 I have not read yet.

I checked what's left (I didn’t count the points but just checked which books had at least two high votes). Surprisingly I got 21 books. It seems that you have missed Maus by Art Spiegelmann (StevieFan13’s #8, Dexter’s #73 and #14 of mine). Not a top 20 material (it would be fun if Catch ’22 had been #22) but definitely enough for top 100. Or was Maus somehow ineligible?

Yeah, I had ended up deciding it was nonfiction and therefore was ineligible (it was very borderline though). Here's the post on that: http://www.acclaimedmusic.net/forums/viewtopic.php?f=8&t=4603#p75025

Ironically, one of our top 20 is also considered nonfiction by The Greatest Books, but it was too late to change my assessment of it by the time I had realized (it was also a borderline case).

For what it's worth, Maus would have finished around #65.

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Re: AMF Favorite Books Poll: THE RESULTS

Postby Listyguy » Thu Oct 05, 2017 5:32 pm

20. The Road – Cormac McCarthy (2006)




Score:
269.34

Voters:
Dexter (#3)
Gillingham (#5)
antonius (#32)
Listyguy (#35)
Petri (#36)
Nick (#41)
Miguel (#62)

Camus wrote that the world is ugly and cruel, but it is only by adding to that ugliness and cruelty that we sin most gravely. The Road affirms belief in the tender pricelessness of the here and now. In creating an exquisite nightmare, it does not add to the cruelty and ugliness of our times; it warns us now how much we have to lose.
–Alan Warner, for The Guardian

The Greatest Books rank: 317


19. Don Quixote – Miguel de Cervantes (1615)



Full Title: The Ingenious Nobleman Don Quixote de La Mancha
Also Known As: El Ingenioso Hidalgo Don Quijote de la Mancha

Score:
273.14

Voters:
schaefer.tk (#3)
Chambord (#3)
Nick (#3)
Greg (#47)

In 2002 I took part in a Norwegian book club poll of 100 authors from all over the world to find the "best and most central works in world literature". Don Quixote was first of the selected 100 books, with 50% more votes than any other book. Was the novel selected because the writers felt a primitive love and attachment to the story and characters, or were they making a historical judgment about its importance as the first real novel?
–A.S. Byatt

The Greatest Books rank: 1


18. Siddhartha – Hermann Hesse (1922)




Score:
287.06

Voters:
schaefer.tk (#2)
DaveC (#5)
Krurze (#9)
Listyguy (#30)
Dexter (#45)
bonnielaurel (#88)

As the Dawning of the Age of Aquarius slowly turned to Dusk, Siddhartha experienced a strange feeling of contentment. He could laugh when the river laughed. He was Atman. He was Earth, Wind and Fire.
–John Crace, for The Guardian

The Greatest Books rank: 276


17. The Lord of the Rings Series – J.R.R. Tolkien (1954-1955)



Titles: The Fellowship of the Ring, The Two Towers, The Return of the King

Score:
300.21

Voters:
Dexter (#8)
Nick (#10)
whuntva (#12)
schaefer.tk (#13)
Petri (#25)
antonius (#46)
madzong (#52)
DaveC (#53)


Of any imaginary world the reader demands that it seem real, and the standard of realism demanded today is much stricter than in the time, say, of Malory. Mr. Tolkien is fortunate in possessing an amazing gift for naming and a wonderfully exact eye for description; by the time one has finished his book one knows the histories of Hobbits, Elves, Dwarves and the landscape they inhabit as well as one knows one's own childhood.
–W.H. Auden, for New York Times

The Greatest Books rank: 97


16. The Trial – Franz Kafka (1915)



Also Known As: Der Process

Score:
308.12

Voters:
Michel (#3)
Petri (#8)
Krurze (#10)
antonius (#19)
DaveC (#21)
Greg (#37)
bonnielaurel (#94)

The Trial is deeply thought-provoking in its uncomfortable presentation of a world where people are observed by secret police and suddenly arrested...There are striking parallels to Orwell's 1984.
–The Guardian

The Greatest Books rank: 37

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Re: AMF Favorite Books Poll: THE RESULTS

Postby DaveC » Thu Oct 05, 2017 6:59 pm

Nick wrote:Congratulations to the author of our #29 book, Kazuo Ishiguro! Just this morning Ishiguro won the Nobel Prize in Literature.


Very well deserved. Good article from The Guardian

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Re: AMF Favorite Books Poll: THE RESULTS

Postby letmeintomyzone » Thu Oct 05, 2017 11:46 pm


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Re: AMF Favorite Books Poll: THE RESULTS

Postby Listyguy » Fri Oct 06, 2017 4:12 am

15. Harry Potter Series – J.K. Rowling (1997-2007)



Titles: Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone (also known as Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hollows

Score:
310.41

Voters:
prosecutorgodot (#2)
StevieFan13 (#13)
madzong (#17)
Nick (#18)
schaefer.tk (#22)
whuntva (#33)
Dexter (#54)
DaveC (#70)

…Has all the makings of a classic…Rowling uses classic narrative devices with flair and originality and delivers a complex and demanding plot in the form of a hugely entertaining thriller.
-Lindsey Fraser

The Greatest Books rank: 170 (highest ranking individual book in series)


14. Brave New World – Aldous Huxley (1932)




Score:
331.85

Voters:
whuntva (#3)
Listyguy (#6)
Dexter (#14)
DocBrown (#29)
Nick (#31)
Miguel (#33)
Michel (#41)
bonnielaurel (#96)
antonius (#99)
DaveC (#100)

It was Huxley's genius to present us to ourselves in all our ambiguity. Alone among the animals, we suffer from the future perfect tense. Rover the Dog cannot imagine a future world of dogs in which all fleas will have been eliminated and doghood will finally have achieved its full glorious potential.
–Margaret Atwood

The Greatest Books rank: 74


13. Moby-Dick – Herman Melville (1851)



Full Title: Moby-Dick, or, The Whale

Score:
347.68

Voters:
Greg (#1)
Chambord (#11)
prosecutorgodot (#13)
DocBrown (#16)
Listyguy (#18)
Nick (#21)
Dexter (#51)
bonnielaurel (#79)

Moby-Dick is usually described, as I've just done, as an elemental novel in which the outsider Ishmael is pitted against the fathomless infinity of the sea, grappling with the big questions of existence. That's not inaccurate, but there's also another Moby-Dick, full of rough humour, sharp comic moments, and witty asides.
–Robert McCrum, for The Guardian

The Greatest Books rank: 6


12. War and Peace – Leo Tolstoy (1867)



Also Known As: Voyná i mir

Score:
349.95

Voters:
Chambord (#2)
bonnielaurel (#3)
DaveC (#3)
Greg (#11)
schaefer.tk (#20)

The book has the worst opening sentence of any major novel, ever. It also has the very worst closing sentence by a country mile, which you will have to read four times before deciding that its proposition is perfect nonsense. In between, its greatness goes without saying: what sometimes gets forgotten is that it is not just great, but also the best novel ever written – the warmest, the roundest, the best story and the most interesting.
–Philip Hensher, for The Guardian

The Greatest Books rank: 5


11. Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas – Hunter S. Thompson (1971)



Full Title: Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas: A Savage Journey to the Heart of the American Dream

Score:
353.54

Voters:
ordinaryperson (#1)
Krurze (#2)
madzong (#11)
Dexter (#17)
Nick (#32)
schaefer.tk (#36)
Gillingham (#49)

Thompson combines moral seriousness with delirious invective, amphetamine urgency and trickster humour. Watergate was like something this Thompson dreamt into existence, coming down one morning from a barking LSD high.
–Ian Penman, for The Guardian

The Greatest Books rank: 27 (Is ranked as non-fiction)

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Re: AMF Favorite Books Poll: THE RESULTS

Postby Listyguy » Fri Oct 06, 2017 4:12 am

So we're down to 10! I'd love to see some predictions for how you think the list will play out.


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