AMF's 100 Greatest TV and Film Actors and Actresses of All Time (2017): Results

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AMF's 100 Greatest TV and Film Actors and Actresses of All Time (2017): Results

Postby Dexter » Sun Jun 18, 2017 8:09 am

Here now are the Top 100 TV and Film Actors and Actresses of All Time based on the votes of 15 AMFers. I will be copying the format used by Petri in his previous All-Time results thread together with the points accumulated, the number of votes, the biggest fan, and a short bio (taken from a mix of wikipedia, allmovie.com and biography.com).

At the outset, a big thank you to all who voted. 530 actors/actresses were named in the ballots and until the last day of voting the top spot was up for grabs. I will probably count down ten to twenty spots per day before finally revealing the top two spots.

Below are the 15 voters in chronological order (with the number of entries listed in parentheses) and, as a honorable mention, their highest ranked actor/actress who did not make the the top 100:

StevieFan13 (30): Danny DeVito (#9)
bonnielaurel (100): Michelle Pfeiffer (#12)
BleuPanda (100): Heath Ledger (#27)
Superpan (100): Paulette Goddard (#7)
acroamor (100): Greta Gerwig (#9)
bootsy (100): Mary Tyler Moore (#13)
Bruno (100): Grace Kelly (#18)
Petri (100): Tommi Korpela (#1)
Miguel (100): Eusebio Poncela (#12)
Michel (100): Louis Jouvet (#2)
prosecutorgodot (50): Will Smith (#6)
babydoll (30): Setsuko Hara (#9)
JR (70): Vicki Lawrence (#4)
Midaso (30): Ethan Hawke (#21)
Dexter (100): Viola Davis (#16)

I will reveal the individual ballots as well as the full list at the end of the countdown. Please bear with me for any inadequacies as this is my first time running a poll and feel free to post your comments/opinions/predictions.

Now on to the countdown...
Last edited by Dexter on Sun Jun 18, 2017 9:51 am, edited 2 times in total.

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Re: AMF's 100 Greatest TV and Film Actors and Actresses of All Time (2017): Results

Postby Dexter » Sun Jun 18, 2017 9:50 am


100. Sally Field (1946-)



Points: 100.03

Votes: 3

Biggest Fan: bootsy (#8)

Bio: Field's big break came when she played the lead role in the TV sitcom Gidget (1965). She next appeared in the hit TV series' The Flying Nun (1967) and Smokey and the Bandit (1977). Field won Emmy Awards for her performances in Sybil (1976), Beautiful (2000) and Saturday Evening Post (2007), and she won Academy Awards for Norma Rae (1979) and Places in the Heart (1984).



99. Bea Arthur (1922-2009)



Points: 100.06

Votes: 2

Biggest Fan: JR (#2)

Bio: Arthur appeared on All the in Family (1971-1972), and her character Maude received a spin-off show (1972-1978) which dealt with topics like women's rights and abortion. Arthur also starred in The Golden Girls (1985-1992), one of the few series to feature a cast of actresses over the age of 40.



98. John Goodman (1952-)



Points: 100.17

Votes: 5

Biggest Fan: Midaso (#18)

Bio: In the 1980s, Goodman landed a string of TV and film appearances. In 1985, he starred in the musical Big River and stayed until he was cast in his first sizable film role: the David Byrne comedy True Stories (1986). This led to a role in Raising Arizona (1987). He was then recruited for the sitcom Roseanne (1988-1996), which won him several Emmy nominations. He has continued his distinguished on-screen career by appearing in films such as The Big Lebowski (1998), Monsters, Inc. (2001), Argo (2012) and The Monuments Men (2014).



97. Burt Lancaster (1913-1994)



Points: 100.39

Votes: 5

Biggest Fan: Dexter (#13)

Bio: Lancaster enjoyed phenomenal success from his first film, The Killers (1946), to his last, Field of Dreams (1989) -- over a career spanning more than four decades. Boasting an impressively wide range, he delivered thoughtful, sensitive performances across a spectrum of genres: from film noir to Westerns to melodrama, he commanded the screen with a presence and power matched by only a handful of stars.



96. Julie Andrews (1935-)



Points: 100.40

Votes: 4

Biggest Fan: prosecutorgodot (#9)

Bio: Andrews won an Academy Award for playing the title role in Mary Poppins (1964) and was also nominated for her performance in The Sound of Music(1965). Andrews later worked on a number of acclaimed films with husband Blake Edwards, and was made an English dame in 2000.



95. Betty White (1922-)



Points: 100.42

Votes: 2

Biggest Fan: JR (#3)

Bio: White is a comedic actress who has been in show business, from TV to film, since the 1950s, most notably on The Mary Tyler Moore Show (1973-1977) and The Golden Girls (1985-1992). In these 50-odd years, White has appeared in sitcoms, on game shows, and, most recently, on Saturday Night Live as the host, after a Facebook-fueled effort to get her to host the show.



94. Gena Rowlands (1930-)



Points: 100.67

Votes: 3

Biggest Fan: Michel (#5)

Bio: Always a capable leading lady, Rowlands blossomed into full stardom in the films directed by her husband, John Cassavetes. She first collaborated with him on A Child Is Waiting (1963) and then starred as a prostitute in his 1968 film Faces. Rowlands went on to earn Oscar nominations for her work in two of her husband's other films, A Woman Under the Influence (1974) and Gloria (1980).



93. Kirk Douglas (1916-)



Points: 100.81

Votes: 5

Biggest Fan: Miguel (#16)

Bio: After stints in the U.S. Navy and on Broadway, Douglas broke into the movies with The Strange Love of Martha Ivers (1946). He went on to critical acclaim in such films as The Bad and the Beautiful (1952), Lust for Life (1956) and Paths of Glory (1957). One of his biggest hits was 1960's Spartacus.



92. Johnny Depp (1963-)



Points: 100.89

Votes: 5

Biggest Fan: prosecutorgodot (#10)

Bio: Depp, landed his first legitimate movie role in the film Nightmare on Elm Street (1984) and was initially known as a teel idol thanks to his role on the TV show 21 Jump Street (1987-1990). He survived the perils of adolescent heartthrob status to earn a reputation as a respected adult actor. Depp has also become known for taking on darker roles and portraying eccentric characters, in Tim Burton films such as Edward Scissorhands (1990), Ed Wood (1994), Sleepy Hollow (1999) and Sweney Todd (2007), and for his role as Captain Jack Sparrow in the Pirates of the Caribbean series (2003-).



91. Faye Dunaway (1941-)



Points: 101.05

Votes: 4

Biggest Fan: bootsy (#15)

Bio: Dunaway worked onstage before moving to the big screen and starring in the pioneering film Bonnie and Clyde (1967), for which she received an Oscar nomination. She has appeared in several iconic films throughout her career, including The Thomas Crown Affair (1968) and Chinatown (1974). She won an Academy Award in 1976 for her role in Network.








...I will end here today because it took me forever to get this presentation right.

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Re: AMF's 100 Greatest TV and Film Actors and Actresses of All Time (2017): Results

Postby StevieFan13 » Sun Jun 18, 2017 4:00 pm

Pretty agreeable list so far. Like having Betty White make the cut.
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Re: AMF's 100 Greatest TV and Film Actors and Actresses of All Time (2017): Results

Postby Bruno » Sun Jun 18, 2017 5:03 pm

Great start, Dexter!

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Re: AMF's 100 Greatest TV and Film Actors and Actresses of All Time (2017): Results

Postby babydoll » Sun Jun 18, 2017 10:09 pm

Dexter wrote:bootsy (100): Mary Tyler Moore (#13)

I'm so sorry. I thought that was for movies. Otherwise, Mary Tyler Moore would have snuck in.

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Re: AMF's 100 Greatest TV and Film Actors and Actresses of All Time (2017): Results

Postby Dexter » Mon Jun 19, 2017 3:20 am

StevieFan13 wrote:Pretty agreeable list so far. Like having Betty White make the cut.

I agree, the voters have great taste in their thespians. I like Betty White, I'm the other voter.

Bruno wrote:Great start, Dexter!

Thanks Bruno! This is harder than I expected though I expect it to be easier going forward.

babydoll wrote:
Dexter wrote:bootsy (100): Mary Tyler Moore (#13)

I'm so sorry. I thought that was for movies. Otherwise, Mary Tyler Moore would have snuck in.

Oh. You can PM a revised list if you like (and I will make the necessary adjustments) though Mary Tyler Moore would still not make the cut as you are the only one who voted for her.

On to #90-81:


90. Jane Fonda (1937-)



Points: 101.31

Votes: 4

Biggest Fan: Dexter (#17)

Bio: Daughter of acclaimed actor Henry Fonda, Jane starred in the acclaimed films Klute (1971) and Coming Home (1978), winning Oscars for both. Off screen, she was a civil rights and anti-war activist and starting in the '80s, a fitness guru. Fonda's recent projects include The Newsroom (2012-2014), Grace and Frankie and Youth (2015-).



89. Liv Ullman (1938-)



Points: 101.62

Votes: 3

Biggest Fan: BleuPanda (#9)

Bio: Ullmann's breakthrough role was catatonic actress Elisabeth Vogler in Ingmar Bergman's Persona (1966), a part she landed primarily because of her striking resemblance to co-star Bibi Andersson. She was honored with numerous New York Film Critics Awards during the early '70s; she also earned Oscar nominations for her work in The Emigrants (1971) and Bergman's Face to Face (1976).



88. Sean Connery (1930-)



Points: 101.73

Votes: 6

Biggest Fans: bonnielaurel and Michel (#25)

Bio: In the '50s, Connery was cast in numerous U.K. films and TV programs. In the early '60s, he landed the lead role of James Bond in Dr. No (1962), continuing the role in followups like Goldfinger (1964) and Thunderball (1965) while gaining massive popularity. He worked regularly in film thereafter, and in 1987 won an Academy Award in the category of supporting actor for The Untouchables. Connery later starred in the adventure films Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (1989), The Hunt for Red October (1990), and The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen (2003) before retiring from acting.



87. George Clooney (1961-)



Points: 102.27

Votes: 4

Biggest Fan: acroamor (#24)

Bio: George Clooney is an actor best known for his breakout role in 1992 as Dr. Doug Ross on TV's ER and Danny Ocean in the Ocean's Eleven films (2001-). In 2005, Clooney won an Academy Award for his performance in Syriana . TIME magazine has called the actor "The Last Movie Star."



86. Christian Bale (1974-)



Points: 102.41

Votes: 4

Biggest Fan: acroamor (#7)

Bio: Bale is one of the few Hollywood actors whose child stardom has successfully translated to steady and respectable adult employment. He first enjoyed major feature film success in Steven Spielberg's Empire of the Sun (1987). Returning to the spotlight with the sadistic American Psycho (2000), he dropped more than 60 pounds for The Machinist (2004) before beefing up for a superhero role in Batman Begins (2005) and its two sequels. Bale won an Oscar for his performance in The Fighter (2010) and later earned recognition for his roles in American Hustle (2013) and The Big Short (2015).



85. Marilyn Monroe (1926-1962)



Points: 102.51

Votes: 4

Biggest Fan: bonnielaurel (#10)

Bio: The most endlessly talked-about and mythologized figure in Hollywood history, Marilyn Monroe remains the ultimate superstar, her rise and fall the stuff that both dreams and nightmares are made of. Innocent, vulnerable, and impossibly alluring, she defined the very essence of screen sexuality. Rising from pin-up girl to international superstar, a luminous and incomparably magnetic screen presence. She was also a gifted comedienne whom the camera adored, most memorably in Bus Stop (1956) and Some Like It Hot (1959). In short, she had it all, yet her career and life came crashing to a tragic halt, a Cinderella story gone horribly wrong; dead before her time -- her fragile beauty trapped in amber, impervious to the ravages of age -- Monroe endures as the movies' greatest and most beloved icon, a legend eclipsing all others.



84. Max von Sydow (1929-)



Points: 102.59

Votes: 5

Biggest Fan: BleuPanda (#15)

Bio: After establishing himself in theater, von Sydow made his film debut in 1949. He began his collaboration with Ingmar Bergman with The Seventh Seal (1957), in which he portrays a knight who plays chess with Death. Standing over six feet-four inches tall, the bony actor spent much of his acting career portraying stern, oppressive characters. He received an Oscar-nomination for his performance in Pelle the Conqueror (1988) and coming nearly sixty years after his earliest film work, Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close (2011) earned the venerable actor his second Oscar nomination - a Best Supporting Actor nod for his portrayal of a mute grandfather.



83. Jennifer Lawrence (1990-)



Points: 102.62

Votes: 6

Biggest Fan: BleuPanda (#16)

Bio: Lawrence began her career as a teenager, appearing on shows like Monk and The Bill Engvall Show from 2006 through 2009. In 2008, she appeared alongside Charlize Theron in the critically acclaimed film The Burning Plain, for which she won the Marcello Mastroianni Award for the best young emerging actor/actress. She next made waves starring as the daughter of a troubled mother in 2010's Winter's Bone, which garnered her an Oscar nomination for Best Actress. Jennifer Lawrence is a versatile actress known for her roles in the The Hunger Games (2012-2015) and X-Men (2011-2016) series. She won an Oscar for her work in David O. Russell's Silver Linings Playbook (2012) and continued to work with the director on American Hustle (2013) and Joy (2015), winning Golden Globes for all three projects as well.



82. Diane Keaton (1946-)



Points: 103.06

Votes: 4

Biggest Fan: Midaso (#16)

Bio: Keaton shot to fame in the '70s for her work in several Woody Allen films, including Annie Hall (1977), which earned her an Oscar for best actress. In addition to her comedic work in films like Father of the Bride (1991), The First Wives Club (1996) and Something's Gotta Give (2003), Keaton's decades-long career has included memorable dramatic roles in films such as The Godfather series (1972-1990), Reds (1981) and Marvin's Room (1996).



81. Peter O'Toole (1932-2013)



Points: 103.91

Votes: 3

Biggest Fan: Dexter (#6)

Bio: O'Toole was one of Hollywood's most highly regarded actors. His rise to stardom began in 1962, when he played T.E. Lawrence in Lawrence of Arabia. He went on to appear in such critically heralded films as Becket (1964) and The Lion in Winter (1968). He proved that when an actor is faced with a bitter personal crisis and struggles with addiction, spirit and determination can often lead to a forceful "third act" in that performer's career that rivals anything to have preceded it. Blessed with an immensity of dramatic power, the fair-haired, blue-eyed, flamboyant, and virile O'Toole chalked up one of the most formidable acting resumes of the 20th century during the 1950s and '60s, before experiencing an ugly bout of self-destruction in the mid-'70s that led to serious health problems, several disappointing and embarrassing roles, and the destruction of his marriage, and threatened in the process to bury his career. By 1980, however, O'Toole overcame his problems and resurfaced, triumphantly, as a box-office star with successes including My Favorite Year (1982) and Venus (2006).



... I will post #80-71 this evening.
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Re: AMF's 100 Greatest TV and Film Actors and Actresses of All Time (2017): Results

Postby babydoll » Mon Jun 19, 2017 3:31 am

Dexter wrote:
babydoll wrote:
Dexter wrote:bootsy (100): Mary Tyler Moore (#13)

I'm so sorry. I thought that was for movies. Otherwise, Mary Tyler Moore would have snuck in.

Oh. You can PM a revised list if you like (and I will make the necessary adjustments) though Mary Tyler Moore would still not make the cut as you are the only one who voted for her.

Nah, my list is fine.

But, seriously, people, The Dick Van Dyke Show and The Mary Tyler Moore Show are classics. People have gotta start giving Mary Tyler Moore (may she rest in peace) the love she deserves and what she once received.

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Re: AMF's 100 Greatest TV and Film Actors and Actresses of All Time (2017): Results

Postby BleuPanda » Mon Jun 19, 2017 4:01 am

Aw, I was hoping the Bergman crew would have stronger performances; though I'm excited at two of the other foreign actors who are still in going off being above Heath Ledger in my list.

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Re: AMF's 100 Greatest TV and Film Actors and Actresses of All Time (2017): Results

Postby bootsy » Mon Jun 19, 2017 4:24 am

babydoll wrote:
Dexter wrote:
babydoll wrote:I'm so sorry. I thought that was for movies. Otherwise, Mary Tyler Moore would have snuck in.

Oh. You can PM a revised list if you like (and I will make the necessary adjustments) though Mary Tyler Moore would still not make the cut as you are the only one who voted for her.

Nah, my list is fine.

But, seriously, people, The Dick Van Dyke Show and The Mary Tyler Moore Show are classics. People have gotta start giving Mary Tyler Moore (may she rest in peace) the love she deserves and what she once received.

Hey I tried.

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Re: AMF's 100 Greatest TV and Film Actors and Actresses of All Time (2017): Results

Postby bootsy » Mon Jun 19, 2017 4:25 am

Dexter wrote:


86. Christian Bale (1974-)



Points: 102.41

Votes: 4

Biggest Fans: acroamor (#7)

Bio: Bale is one of the few Hollywood actors whose child stardom has successfully translated to steady and respectable adult employment. He first enjoyed major feature film success in Steven Spielberg's Empire of the Sun (1987). Returning to the spotlight with the sadistic American Psycho (2000), he dropped more than 60 pounds for The Machinist (2004) before beefing up for a superhero role in Batman Begins(2005) and its two sequels. Bale won an Oscar for his performance in The Fighter (2010) and later earned recognition for his roles in American Hustle (2013) and The Big Short (2015).



FTFY

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Re: AMF's 100 Greatest TV and Film Actors and Actresses of All Time (2017): Results

Postby Dexter » Mon Jun 19, 2017 5:02 am

babydoll wrote:But, seriously, people, The Dick Van Dyke Show and The Mary Tyler Moore Show are classics. People have gotta start giving Mary Tyler Moore (may she rest in peace) the love she deserves and what she once received.

Sorry babydoll, one other AMFer voted for Mary Tyler Moore, JR who listed her at #67. Basically, if you placed her inside your top 10 then she would have made the cut. Mary Tyler Moore was unfortunately cut from my final (personal) list.

bootsy wrote:FTFY

Corrected, thanks! Now, I just have to proofread internet articles moving forward :-| .

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Re: AMF's 100 Greatest TV and Film Actors and Actresses of All Time (2017): Results

Postby Superpan » Mon Jun 19, 2017 7:54 am

Quick edit but Peter O'Toole accidentally has Diane Keaton's dates. His are (1932-2013), though being 16 in Lawrence of Arabia would be quite the feat.

Gah! Just wrote a super-long post about each of the actors that got munched up by me being auto-logged out. Ah, the joys of forum-posting...

Anyway just wanted to say great job on the write-ups! Really looking forward to how these actors are rolling out. Nice to see Paulette at least acknowledged in the honorable mentions. I'll share in the Mary Tyler Moore love, along with Grace Kelly and Greta Gerwig. There was definitely some tough choices in coming up with the right mix. I do want to shine a special spotlight on Michelle Pfeiffer though. After suffering through Grease 2 over three times for work last year, I've become convinced she's one of our most versatile and under-appreciated actresses.

Anyhow, I did have short paragraphs prepped for each actor with my thoughts on them, but, you know, :angry-banghead: . Well, easy come, easy go but I'll try to recreate it over the next couple of days. Hard to pick a favorite from the 20 (probably Connery) but so far the choices are proving respectably diverse.

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Re: AMF's 100 Greatest TV and Film Actors and Actresses of All Time (2017): Results

Postby Dexter » Tue Jun 20, 2017 2:45 am

Superpan wrote:Quick edit but Peter O'Toole accidentally has Diane Keaton's dates. His are (1932-2013), though being 16 in Lawrence of Arabia would be quite the feat.

Gah! Just wrote a super-long post about each of the actors that got munched up by me being auto-logged out. Ah, the joys of forum-posting...

Corrected, thanks! Would love to read your post if you ever decide to rewrite it.

Guys, I know I said I will post #80-71 but I just cannot manage to multitask between my day job and doing this without a bungling one or the other. I am sure you will agree that quality beats quantity so I'm trimming my post to 5 in the morning and 5 in the evening. I hope you can understand.

Back to our program...


80. Greta Garbo (1905-1990)




Points: 104.15

Votes: 4

Biggest Fan: Superpan (#17)

Bio: A reclusive star, Garbo began her career in Europe before coming to the U.S. to work for MGM when she was 19. Her sensual, mysterious look made her a hit with audiences, both in silent and sound films. The advent of talkies obliged her to drop the "mysterious temptress" characterization she'd used in silents in favor of more richly textured performances as worldly, somewhat melancholy women to whom the normal pleasures of love and contentment would always be just out of reach. In this vein, Garbo starred in Grand Hotel (1932), Queen Christina (1933), Anna Karenina (1935), and Camille (1936), which served to increase her worshipful fan following, even if the films weren't the box-office smashes her silent pictures had been. She was nominated for three Oscars in four films: Anna Christie (her much hyped first talking film dubbed "Garbo Talks!") and Romance both in 1930, Camille and Ninotchka (dubbed "Garbo Laughs!", 1939), later winning an honorary award in 1954 for her "luminous and unforgettable screen performances." The actress' legendary aloofness and desire to "be alone" (a phrase she used often in her films, once to comic effect in Ninotchka) added to her appeal as well as a convenient target for satire and lampoon. She retired from the screen, at the age of 35, after acting in 28 films. From then on, Garbo declined all opportunities to return to the screen. Shunning publicity, she began a private life. Even after her death, the legend of Greta Garbo was undiminished. Few of her fans talk of her in human terms; to her devotees, she was not so much film legend as film goddess.



79. Marx Brothers (Chico 1887-1961, Harpo 1888-1964, Groucho 1890-1977)



Points: 104.42

Votes: 5

Biggest Fan: Petri (#13)

Bio: The Marx Brothers were a family comedy act that was successful in vaudeville, on Broadway, and in motion pictures from 1905 to 1949. They revolutionized American comedy with their anarchistic, faster-than-lightning, anything-goes approach. The core of the act was the three elder brothers, each developed a highly distinctive stage persona: Chico was the Italian who mangled the English language and played the piano; Harpo never spoke, chased blondes, created general mayhem, and played the harp; Groucho, with his grease paint mustache and tilted walk, was a fast-talking wisecracker often on the dubious side of the law or morality. Five of their films were selected by the American Film Institute (AFI) as among the top 100 comedy films, with two of them (Duck Soup in 1933 and A Night at the Opera in 1935) in the top 12. They are widely considered by critics, scholars, and fans to be among the greatest and most influential comedians of the 20th century. The brothers were included in AFI's list of the 25 greatest male stars of Classic Hollywood cinema, the only performers to be inducted collectively.



78. Clark Gable (1901-1960)



Points: 104.62

Votes: 5

Biggest Fan: babydoll (#17)

Bio: Gable initially had a hard time getting Hollywood roles, due to his big ears. After signing with MGM, he was cast with stars like Greta Garbo and Joan Crawford, and his popularity soared. He won an Oscar for It Happened One Night (1934), and was nominated for leading roles in Mutiny on the Bounty (1935) and for his best-known role as Rhett Butler in Gone with the Wind (1939) leading him to be dubbed “King of Hollywood,” epitomizing Hollywood's Golden Age. When his third wife, actress Carole Lombard died in a plane crash, a disconsolate Gable seemed to lose all interest in life. Though far beyond draft age, he entered the Army Air Corps and served courageously in WWII as a tail-gunner. But what started out as a death wish renewed his popularity. (Ironically, he was the favorite film star of Adolf Hitler, who offered a reward to his troops for the capture of Gable -- alive). He died two days after his final film, The Misfits (which was also Marilyn Monroe’s last film), was completed. Most of the U.S. newspapers announced his death with a four-word headline: "The King is Dead."



77. Robert Mitchum (1917-1997)



Points: 104.78

Votes: 4

Biggest Fan: Miguel (#19)

Bio: The day after Mitchum died, James Stewart also died, diverting all the press attention that was gearing up for Mitchum. So it has been for much of his career. Unlike the wholesome middle-American idealism and charm of Stewart, there was something unsettling and dangerous about Mitchum. He was a walking contradiction. Behind his drooping, sleepy eyes (he claimed were caused by chronic insomnia and an injury when he was a young boxer) was an alert intelligence. His tall, muscular frame, broken nose, and lifeworn face evoked a laborer's life, but he moved with the effortless, laid-back grace of a highly trained athlete. Early in his career critics generally ignored him, who frequently appeared in lower-budget and often low-quality films. This may also be due in part to his subtle, unaffected, and deceptively easy-going acting style that made it seem as if Mitchum just didn't care, an attitude he frequently put on outside the studio. But audiences found him appealing. A legendary tough guy on and off-screen, Mitchum was later associated with the post-war film noir thriller, his laconic, heavy-lidded manner was deceptively casual, disguising a potent screen presence, and is generally considered a forerunner of the antiheroes prevalent in film during the '50s and '60s. His best-known films include Out of the Past (1947), The Night of the Hunter (1955), and Cape Fear (1962).



76. Shirley MacLaine (1934-)



Points: 105.07

Votes: 5

Biggest Fan: bonnielaurel (#16)

Bio: Named after actress Shirely Temple, MacLaine is one of Hollywood's legendary leading ladies, known for a vast span of films. She grew up with sibling Warren Beatty and went on to Broadway. In the mid-'50s, she started working in film. She received Oscar Best Actress nominations for Some Came Running (1958), The Apartment (1960), Irma la Douce (1963), and The Turning Point (1977), before winning Best Actress for Terms of Endearment (1983). She twice won the BAFTA Award for Best Foreign Actress, for Ask Any Girl (1959), and The Apartment (1960). She has also won five competitive Golden Globe Awards and received the Golden Globe Cecil B. DeMille Award at the 1998 ceremony. She also received the 40th American Film Institute Life Achievement Award in 2012 and the Kennedy Center Honors in 2013 for her lifetime contributions to American culture through the performing arts.
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Re: AMF's 100 Greatest TV and Film Actors and Actresses of All Time (2017): Results

Postby BleuPanda » Tue Jun 20, 2017 3:09 am

Wow, never knew Clark Gable was only 15 in Gone With the Wind!

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Re: AMF's 100 Greatest TV and Film Actors and Actresses of All Time (2017): Results

Postby Dexter » Tue Jun 20, 2017 3:21 am

BleuPanda wrote:Wow, never knew Clark Gable was only 15 in Gone With the Wind!

See! :scared-yipes:

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Re: AMF's 100 Greatest TV and Film Actors and Actresses of All Time (2017): Results

Postby Dexter » Tue Jun 20, 2017 8:57 am


75. Gérard Depardieu (1948-)



Points: 105.18

Votes: 5

Biggest Fan: bonnielaurel (#13)

Bio: Depardieu is one of the most prolific actors in film history, having completed approximately 170 movies since 1967.Despite his unorthodox visage, he has made a profound mark on the acting world, earning a recognition as one of Europe's most accomplished performers and appealing leading men. By the '80s, Depardieu had become one of the most popular French actors, appreciated for his portrayal of gentle yet masculine characters. He received critical acclaim for his performances in The Last Metro (1980), Police (1985), Jean de Florette (1986), and Cyrano de Bergerac (1990), winning the Cannes Film Festival for Best Actor, his second César Award for Best Actor, and his first Academy Award nomination for Best Actor. He co-starred in Peter Weir's comedy Green Card (1990), winning a Golden Globe Award and later acted in many big budget Hollywood movies including Ridley Scott's 1492: Conquest of Paradise (1992), Kenneth Branagh's Hamlet (1996), Randall Wallace's The Man in the Iron Mask (1998), and Ang Lee's Life of Pi (2012).



74. Judy Garland (1922-1969)



Points: 106.96

Votes: 5

Biggest Fan: JR (#16)

Bio: Actress and singer Judy Garland was the star of many classic musical films, and was known for her tremendous talent and troubled life. She signed a movie contract with MGM at the age of 13. She made more than two dozen films with MGM, including nine with Mickey Rooney. Garland's most famous role was as Dorothy in The Wizard of Oz (1939). Her other roles at MGM included Meet Me in St. Louis (1944), The Harvey Girls (1946) and Easter Parade (1948). The pressures of adolescent stardom sent her to a psychiatrist at age 18. Her self-image was influenced by film executives who said she was unattractive and manipulated her on-screen physical appearance. After 15 years, she was released from MGM. Film appearances became fewer in her later years, but included two Academy Award nominated performances in A Star Is Born (1954) and Judgment at Nuremberg (1961). At 39, she became the youngest and first female recipient of the Cecil B. DeMille Award for lifetime achievement in the film industry.



73. Ian McKellen (1939-)



Points: 108.08

Votes: 2

Biggest Fan: prosecutorgodot (#1)

Bio: Widely considered one of the leading British actors of his generation, Ian McKellen has had a rich and varied career encompassing the stage, screen, and television. A renowned stage actor in his native Britain for decades, McKellen was not familiar to most American audiences until the '90s, when he began popping up in a number of well-received films. One of these, Gods and Monsters (1998), elevated the actor into the international spotlight when he earned an Oscar nomination for his portrayal of Frankenstein director James Whale. The venerable actor has since cemented his iconic status by starring as Magneto in the X-Men films and Gandalf in The Lord of the Rings franchise.



72. Isabelle Huppert (1953-)



Points: 111.69

Votes: 4

Biggest Fan: Michel (#10)

Bio: One of the most enduring and respected actresses in French cinema, Isabelle Huppert is known for her versatile portrayals of characters ranging from the innocent to the sultry to the comic. Her career has spanned decades, appearing in more than 110 films since her debut in 1971. Known for her mystery, directness and versatility, she has starred in a wide range of films over the decades that include The Lacemaker (1977), Madame Bovary (1991), La cérémonie (1995), The Piano Teacher (2001) and Amour (2012). In 2017, she received the her first Oscar nomination for her lead role in the highly controversial Elle (2016), winning a Golden Globe for the part as well.



71. Robert Duvall (1931-)



Points: 111.69

Votes: 6

Biggest Fan: bootsy (#14)

Bio:One of Hollywood's most distinguished, popular, and versatile actors, Duvall possesses a rare gift for totally immersing himself in his roles. The Oscar-winning actor (he received seven Oscar nominations and won for his role in 1983’s Tender Mercies) has been in an array of iconic films and TV projects, including his debut playing Boo Radley in To Kill a Mockingbird (1962), M*A*S*H (1970), The Godfather Parts I (1972) and II (1974), The Conversation (1974), Network (1976), Apocalypse Now (1979), and Lonesome Dove (1989).

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Re: AMF's 100 Greatest TV and Film Actors and Actresses of All Time (2017): Results

Postby bonnielaurel » Tue Jun 20, 2017 10:02 pm

So my complete top 11 has made it, with only Marilyn Monroe (#10) passed already. Of the numbers 71-100 sixteen were in my list. Of those who didn't make it I had Michelle Pfeiffer at #12 and Grace Kelly at #54. Paulette Goddard fell off due to a lack of quantity.

Fine presentation, Dexter.

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Re: AMF's 100 Greatest TV and Film Actors and Actresses of All Time (2017): Results

Postby Nick » Tue Jun 20, 2017 10:31 pm

I didn't vote, but if I did, James Stewart would've been my #1. Excited to see where he places.

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Re: AMF's 100 Greatest TV and Film Actors and Actresses of All Time (2017): Results

Postby StevieFan13 » Wed Jun 21, 2017 1:54 am

Wowee. Guess this means Emma Stone showed up on multiple people's lists!
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Re: AMF's 100 Greatest TV and Film Actors and Actresses of All Time (2017): Results

Postby Dexter » Wed Jun 21, 2017 2:55 am


70. Amy Adams (1974-)



Points: 112.23

Votes: 3

Biggest Fan: acroamor (#2)

Bio: An actress with a knack for light comedy, Adams began her career on stage performing in dinner theater. After moving to LA, she made several appearances on television and in B-movies, before starring in Catch Me If You Can (2002). Her breakthrough role came in the 2005 film Junebug, in which her quirky and sensitive portrayal of a young pregnant woman earned her an Oscar nomination for Best Supporting Actress. She received three more Oscar nominations for her supporting roles in Doubt (2008), The Fighter (2010), and The Master (2012). In 2013, she played a troubled con artist in American Hustle and won a Golden Globe Award and was nominated for an Oscar for Best Actress. She won a second consecutive Golden Globe Award for portraying artist Margaret Keane in Big Eyes (2014). In 2016, she garnered acclaim for her leading roles in the science-fiction film Arrival and the crime thriller Nocturnal Animals.



69. Robert Downey, Jr. (1965-)



Points: 113.45

Votes: 4

Biggest Fan: Midaso (#13)

Bio: Downey began acting as a child in his father's films. After a short-lived stint on SNL (1985), he appeared in roles associated with the Brat Pack, like Weird Science (1985) and Less Than Zero (1987), the latter he won acclaim playing a cocaine addict. Sadly, the character rang true for Downey, who had been introduced to drugs at the age of eight by his father, and developed a full-fledged addiction as he headed into his 20s. Rehab followed, but his struggles would continue. Yet, his career continued to advance as he cultivated an instinct for role/script selection. His turns in Chances Are (1989), Soapdish (1992), Short Cuts (1993), and Richard III (1995) wowed viewers around the world, and often, on those rare occasions when he did choose substandard material, such as Chaplin (1992), his performance redeemed it. It earned him a Best Actor Oscar nomination, as well as Golden Globe and BAFTA nominations. He was hailed by many critics as one of the most brilliant and versatile actors of his generation. Around this time, Downey's personal life took a turn for the worse. In 1996, he was arrested for among others, drug use and possession of illegal substances, a development which struck many as ironic, given his star-making performance in Less Than Zero. More arrests, rehabs, relapses and complications followed but eventually he turned his life around. He earned a resurgence of critical and popular acclaim, first in Zodiac (2007), and then Tropic Thunder (2008); for the latter he was nominated for an Oscar for Best Supporting Actor. Beginning in 2008, he began portraying the role of Marvel Comics superhero Iron Man in the Marvel Cinematic Universe which helped him topped the Forbes list of highest-paid actors for several years.



68. Marlene Dietrich (1901-1992)



Points: 115.79

Votes: 6

Biggest Fan: babydoll (#18)

Bio: In the '20s in Berlin, Dietrich acted on the stage and in silent films. Her performance as in The Blue Angel (1930) brought her international fame and resulted in a contract with Paramount Pictures. She starred in Hollywood films such as Morocco (1930), Shanghai Express (1932), and Desire (1936). She successfully traded on her glamorous persona and "exotic" looks, and at the peak of her career in the '30s, she was the screen's highest-paid actress. She was the very essence of cinematic eroticism, a beguiling creature whose almost supernatural allure established her among film's most enduring icons. While immensely sensual, Dietrich's persona was also strangely androgynous; her fondness for masculine attire -- suits, top hats, and the like -- not only spawned a fashion craze, it also created an added dimension of sexual ambiguity which served to make her even more magnetic. Throughout her unusually long career, which spanned from the '10s-'80s, she maintained popularity by continually reinventing herself. Throughout WWII, she was a high-profile entertainer in the U.S. Although she still made occasional films after the war, Dietrich spent most of the '50s-'70s touring the world as a marquee live-show performer.



67. Jake Gyllenhaal (1980-)



Points: 116.21

Votes: 4

Biggest Fan: Midaso (#7)

Bio: Gyllenhaal began acting as a child in films like City Slickers (1991) and A Dangerous Woman (1993). In order to make the transition to adult actor, he purposefully passed over teen fare for such films as October Sky (1999) and Donnie Darko (2001), the latter he garnered an Independent Spirit Award nomination for playing a psychologically troubled teenager. For his performance in Brokeback Mountain (2005), he received critical acclaim and won the BAFTA Award and was nominated for a Screen Actors Guild Award, and an Oscar. He received further recognition for roles in Proof, Jarhead (both in 2005), Love & Other Drugs (2010), for which he was nominated for a Golden Globe Award, Prisoners (2013) and Nightcrawler (2014). For Nightcrawler, his performance was widely acclaimed and received rave reviews from critics and he was nominated for the Golden Globe Award, the Screen Actors Guild Award, and the BAFTA Award.



66. Ginger Rogers (1911-1995)



Points: 117.53

Votes: 2

Biggest Fan: Superpan (#3)

Bio: Rogers got her start on the vaudeville circuit before working on Broadway. She soon hit the big screen and would go on to make more than 70 movies. She was revered for her cinematic footwork with Fred Astaire in films like The Gay Divorcee (1934), Top Hat (1935), Swing Time (1936). They revolutionized the Hollywood musical, introducing dance routines of unprecedented elegance and virtuosity, set to songs specially composed for them by the greatest popular song composers of the day. She was considered to be Astaire's finest dance partner, principally because of her ability to combine dancing skills, natural beauty, and exceptional abilities as a dramatic actress and comedian, thus truly complementing Astaire, a peerless dancer who sometimes struggled as an actor and was not considered classically handsome. The resulting song and dance partnership enjoyed a unique credibility in the eyes of audiences. She was also a successful dramatic actress, even winning a Best Actress Oscar playing the titular Kitty Foyle in 1940.

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Re: AMF's 100 Greatest TV and Film Actors and Actresses of All Time (2017): Results

Postby babydoll » Wed Jun 21, 2017 9:55 am

StevieFan13 wrote:Wowee. Guess this means Emma Stone showed up on multiple people's lists!

Well, Emma Stone is pretty talented. I didn't vote for her, because I've only seen Magic in the Moonlight and The Help of hers (I'm so bad at keeping up with modern movies), but she really does have great potential to be a well-respected thespian in her later years.

Now is she better than Judy Garland or Greta Garbo or Jane Fonda? I'm not sure. Is she better than Liv Ullmann (who I can't believe I forgot completely about)? Yeah, no, not at this point. I'm seeing that this list does really have a bias towards more modern people whereas my list was completely biased towards older people. I watched way too many classic movies as a child. I need to start sitting down and watching tons of movies again.

Oh, Dexter, while I'm commenting, you "Garbi" in the biography instead of "Garbo." And I believe Rita Hayworth was actually considered the finest of Fred Astaire's dancing partners. I know Astaire thought Hayworth was the best one he danced with. I also believe people like Cyd Charisse are considered finer dancing partners than Ginger Rogers. Ginger Rogers is just the most iconic one.

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Re: AMF's 100 Greatest TV and Film Actors and Actresses of All Time (2017): Results

Postby Dexter » Wed Jun 21, 2017 12:35 pm

Corrected the "Garbi" flab, thanks babydoll. I appreciate the pointing out of mistakes, I'm only human after all.

I did not vote for Emma too but I think she is worthy of a spot. As to her ranking over the ones mentioned by babydoll, I agree it's more of a bias towards current stars (in correlation to the films the voters saw) and likely the points system too. Take for example Ginger Rogers (#66). Only two AMFers voted for her but she is ahead of Burt Lancaster (#97) who has five votes. It is a matter of not only how many but how high AMFers voted for a particular thespian that makes the difference. Moreover, there were only 15 voters in this poll, so it is understandable that the lower half of the list can easily be affected even by a slight change in rank by a voter. I may be guilty of subconsciously ranking an actor/actress based on the submissions, so in the event I will run a poll like this again I will make sure I will post my list in advance.

It should be also be noted that Ginger Rogers is the last on the list to have 2 voters. There are 2 thespians with 3 voters and also 2 more with 4 voters, the rest have 5 and more voters. Therefore, the closer we get to the top the more effective the representation.

As to Ginger Rogers being the finest dancing partner of Fred Astaire, such statement is not unarguable. The opinions of experts of film dance does not make it conclusive. I cannot form my own opinion on this but I second the opinion that her partnership with Astaire is the most iconic one as I have watched Swing Time and Top Hat based on numerous citations in movie articles and none of the one with Astaire partnering with Hayworth and Charisse.

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Re: AMF's 100 Greatest TV and Film Actors and Actresses of All Time (2017): Results

Postby Superpan » Wed Jun 21, 2017 6:01 pm

Yes Ginger! I had an inkling she might be ranked around here when there was mention of a classic actress being at #58 on the strength of one vote. So far, 8 of my actors have placed on the list.

As for Ginger being the best dancing partner, it depends what you're looking for. I think Hayworth was the one Astaire had the biggest crush on, though he and Ginger dated briefly in New York. Hayworth and Charisse could be said to be better dancers than Rogers, but neither of them could act as well as she could. Out of the 29 musicals I've seen with Fred, she's the only one who isn't more focused on looking pretty than conveying the story of the dance. Maybe Eleanor Powell and Audrey Hepburn come close, but Ginger made Fred a movie star. Without her, he might have just been a novelty act doing one or two numbers a film.

That said, Dexter, I highly recommend The Band Wagon with Fred and Cyd. It's to Broadway what Singin' In The Rain is to movies and just as good. The only downside is that Cyd Charisse can't act her way out of the paper bag, but still dances quite well.

Anyhow, I decided I'll try to repost my original comments on the actors ranked. I'll try to do them in batches of 20, along with how many of their theatrical films I've seen and my personal favorite.

Sally Field - A genuine actress who consistently delivers good performances. However, my first exposure to her was the sugary sweet wholesomeness of Gidget and The Flying Nun, which lingers over all her performances for me. I see her in trailers for Smokey and the Bandit and I bet that she's Smokey because I find it hard to believe she's on the run from the law. I'll admit to a preference for her 21st Century equivalent, Ginnifer Goodwin. Number of Films I've Seen: 5 Favorite: Lincoln

Bea Arthur - A suitably snarky presence, whenever I've seen her. Truth be told, I haven't seen much of Golden Girls even though I had to read a plot summary of every episode for a book report in middle school (long story). Because of this, my favorite moment of hers may be when the Empire shuts down her cantina in The Star Wars Holiday Special. Number of Films I've Seen: 1 Favorite: History of the World Part I is way better than The Star Wars Holiday Special

John Goodman - An actor that sneaks up on you how good he is. More than just your good-natured big daddy, his work with the Coen Bros. alone shows he has one of the biggest ranges any actor working today. What a Good Man! (Ba Dum Tish) Number of Films I've Seen: 15 Favorite: O Brother, Where Art Thou?

Burt Lancaster - An actor I knew probably wouldn't end up on my ballot, but I still felt bad about it. This man used his matinee idol looks to explore dark demons in provocative roles such as J. J. Hunsecker in The Sweet Smell of Success or the man in charge of plotting the JFK assassination in Executive Action. Number of Films I've Seen: 4 Favorite: The Sweet Smell of Success

Julie Andrews - A delightful actress who probably got too boxed in to her typecasting as "prim nanny" from Mary Poppins and The Sound of Music. Even her performances in her husbands sex comedies force her to be a bit of goody-two shoes. But come, who doesn't love her? Number of Films I've Seen: 13 Favorite: Enchanted, but Victor/Victoria is her best lead performance

Betty White - Again, more a movie guy than a TV guy. Still you've got to give her props for staying on top of her game for over 60 years, still sharp and funny as ever, even if her "funny old person" typecasting doesn't lend itself to much masterful cinema. Number of Films I've Seen: 2 Favorite: My favorite performance is probably something from TV such as her appearances on Craig Ferguson or on the The Mary Tyler Moore Show, but her first big screen appearance was in Advise & Consent, which is pretty good.

Gena Rowlands - Have yet to see any of her work. Seeing Husbands freshman year was enough to scare me off from making Cassavettes' films a priority for a while.

Kirk Douglas - Another classic actor who unfortunately couldn't find a spot on my ballot. I first saw him as Ned Land in 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea and I couldn't look away from his charismatic masculinity that wasn't afraid to get tough in this and other films including Ace In The Hole. Off-screen, this man was a hero as well with his public acknowledgment of Dalton Trumbo's contribution to Spartacus crippling the Hollywood Blacklist. No one more deserving of being a centenarian! Besides maybe Olivia de Havilland, of course. Number of Films I've Seen: 5 Favorite: Paths of Glory

Johnny Depp - Depp's a weird actor in that I've seen almost all of his filmography not by choice due to my sister's obsession with him. One can't deny his many eccentric, entertaining, and down right riveting performances he's given in the past with a couple masterpieces such as Ed Wood almost wholly dependent on him. Yet it's hard to see his current troubles with both his art and personal life as a reflection that his gimmicks have become him treading water. Still, can't deny the little tingle of excitement I get when I see him in a cast list. Number of Films I've Seen: 14 Favorite: Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street

Faye Dunaway - Bonnie Parker, Evelyn Mulwray, Diana Christensen, and Joan Crawford. Dunaway made the first three characters immortal while the last one sank her career. In retrospect, it seems a bit harsh that an actress of her stature faded away so relatively quickly, but I can't say I'm that excited to see her do anymore. Still, having her and Warren Beatty (owner of one of Hollywood's more oddball careers) present the Oscars was priceless. Number of Films I've Seen: 3 Favorite: Bonnie and Clyde

Jane Fonda - Bar-Bar-Barbarella, Bar-Bar-Barbarella! Putting aside her controversial political activism and her astonishing good looks (which are weirdly identical to her dad's), Fonda always delivers a solid performance in anything she's in with dignity and aplomb. While my college-developed Fonda Fondness was not enough to get her on my ballot, I always love seeing her act! Number of Films I've Seen: 6 Favorite: Barbarella

Liv Ullman - I've only seen her in Persona. She was pretty good, though Bibi Andersson overshadows her in the film for me. I'm sure I'll see more of her as I continue my deep dive into Bergman.

Sean Connery - Before college, I took Connery for granted as some dumb Scottish jock. However, after seeing him in films from Darby O'Gill and The Little People to The Man Who Would Be King, I realize he may be the screen's most lovable rogue. Always confident and tough yet easy-going at the same time, Connery elevates any film he's in with his presence and persistent accent. He's the only man who could do Zardoz Number of Films I've Seen: 10 Favorite: The Man Who Would Be King

George Clooney - Cary Grant if he took himself seriously. That's only partially a compliment. Clooney, I think, eschews his gift for comedy, displayed in many a Coen Bros. film, in favor of prestige dramas that look good in public but are more or less hollow and soon forgotten. Sometimes I wonder if he'd be better off in politics than acting. Though I may just be being too hard on him because he's possibly the worst Batman. Number of Films I've Seen: 8 Favorite: O Brother, Where Art Thou?

Christian Bale - Another consistent actor, though one whose process always seems to end up on screen. I feel like I'm usually seeing him work than disappear in a role. As far as Batmen go, his Bruce Wayne was perfect in the first two movies and his Batman was good, give or take that voice that they could have eased up on. The third one retroactively makes his character arc seem a little pathetic, though that's not entirely his fault. Number of Films I've Seen: 11 Favorite: The Dark Knight

Marilyn Monroe - This one hurt leaving off mine. Not just because she put the work in to become a good actor, but because she simply was cinema. She's someone screenshots don't do justice in the way she had a winning sense of humor and natural reactiveness to everything. I would say she didn't have enough great movies under her belt, but who needs that when you've got Some Like It Hot? Number of Films I've Seen: 8 Favorite: Some Like It Hot

Max Von Sydow - A great actor, but my God, what a career! The Seventh Seal and the Bergman classics, The Exorcist, Flash Gordon, Connery's last Bond, Hannah and Her Sisters, and Star Wars: The Force Awakens. There may be better filmographies, but never have so many touched so many areas of film history. Number of Films I've Seen: 6 Favorite: The Seventh Seal

Jennifer Lawrence - Perhaps a case of too much too soon? Lawrence made her mark as an incredibly authentic young performer only a couple years ago and she seemed to be everywhere particularly in her trinity of franchises (Hunger Games, X-Men, David O. Russell Oscar Bait). Now, she doesn't seem as hot if only because her ego has attracted more attention and some of her performances seem to have been a little phoned in as of late. Still, her Katniss Everdeen is perhaps the best performance in YA cinema. Number of Films I've Seen: 9 Favorite: X-Men: Days of Future Past

Diane Keaton - While good in dramas, she's at her best when she's a talented comedienne. Opposite Woody Allen in films such as Love and Death, she seems to be the only one who could ever have been a match for him tit for tat. The fact that most of her career seems to have consisted of forgettable fluff is highly regrettable. Number of Films I've Seen: 4 Favorite: Love and Death

Peter O'Toole - I actually took him off my ballot for having too many actors of his type, but that's not the same as saying he's replaceable or generic. No man was ever quite the same blend of enigma and charisma as he was, whether he was Lawrence of Arabia, a Man of La Mancha, or tutoring the Last Emperor of China. Number of Films I've Seen: 6 Favorite: Ratatouille

That's enough for now, will do next 20 tonight or tomorrow.

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Re: AMF's 100 Greatest TV and Film Actors and Actresses of All Time (2017): Results

Postby babydoll » Wed Jun 21, 2017 6:57 pm

Superpan wrote:That said, Dexter, I highly recommend The Band Wagon with Fred and Cyd. It's to Broadway what Singin' In The Rain is to movies and just as good. The only downside is that Cyd Charisse can't act her way out of the paper bag, but still dances quite well.

Yeah, I was shocked when I checked again that Dexter apparently never heard of The Band Wagon - which is actually the most praised Fred Astaire film - landing on the BFI Sight & Sound's Top 250 and ranking very high on TSPDT - because it is really, really good. In fact, it was on TCM just this morning and I was watching it. So, so good. I've seen it multiple times (as well as Top Hat) and I'll probably see it even more times. There's a reason why Minnelli is one of my favorite directors.

Yeah, I only mentioned Rita Hayworth and Cyd Charisse based on their dancing skills. Rita was fine at acting - Gilda wouldn't have been the same without her - but Cyd wasn't that good of an actress, to be kind. Ginger clearly beat both of them in the acting department. In fact, I don't dispute Ginger's position on this list. I only dispute the "She was considered to be Astaire's finest dancer" quote. And, yeah, Eleanor Powell was incredibly good as well. Sadly forgotten for the most part.

And Superpan, I highly recommend The Golden Girls. It is not just a show about "old women," it's like a perpetual roast fest, which Dorothy (Bea Arthur's character) or Dorothy's mother, Sophia (played by the very tiny Estelle Getty), usually wins. I also think Rose Nylund was Betty White's best character to the point where it peeves me to hear people say they like Betty White when I know they're only talking about Hot in Cleveland or The Proposal or whatever the hell she's doing these days.

And, yes, dear God, Jane Fonda looks way too identical to Henry Fonda. Not that it distracts me from recognizing what a fine talent she is.

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Re: AMF's 100 Greatest TV and Film Actors and Actresses of All Time (2017): Results

Postby StevieFan13 » Wed Jun 21, 2017 7:34 pm

The hype machine definitely put more scrutiny on Jennifer Lawrence than anyone (let alone her) could handle, but I don't know if I'd say she has an ego. If anything, she's her own harshest critic, and her laid-back demeanor can sometimes make you forget how completely lost she can get in a role. For me, at least, she definitely earned her spot on this list.
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Re: AMF's 100 Greatest TV and Film Actors and Actresses of All Time (2017): Results

Postby babydoll » Wed Jun 21, 2017 7:49 pm

StevieFan13 wrote:The hype machine definitely put more scrutiny on Jennifer Lawrence than anyone (let alone her) could handle, but I don't know if I'd say she has an ego. If anything, she's her own harshest critic, and her laid-back demeanor can sometimes make you forget how completely lost she can get in a role. For me, at least, she definitely earned her spot on this list.

Oh, I would say she has an ego. She actually used to be polite - while being funny and clumsy and those J.Law mannerisms - but now it's not polite and it's just brash. I think that as her ego grew, the less polite she became.

The thing about Jennifer Lawrence is that I think she excels in challenging roles. I think she's bored playing the X-Men character with its rather constant storyline, leaving her a little more "phoned-in." Currently, she just finished a movie with Darren Aronofsky. I guess we will have to see where it goes, but Mother! certainly sounds like it could be a classic J.Law performance.

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Re: AMF's 100 Greatest TV and Film Actors and Actresses of All Time (2017): Results

Postby bonnielaurel » Wed Jun 21, 2017 8:09 pm

Ginger Rogers was my #22. She had a screen magic that Fred's other partners couldn't match. It has to be mentioned that she did her own singing, while Rita Hayworth and Cyd Charisse were dubbed.

Jennifer Lawrence was my #82. She's one of the greatest talents of the youngest generation, but it remains to be seen how she will evolve.

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Re: AMF's 100 Greatest TV and Film Actors and Actresses of All Time (2017): Results

Postby StevieFan13 » Wed Jun 21, 2017 9:09 pm

babydoll wrote:
StevieFan13 wrote:The hype machine definitely put more scrutiny on Jennifer Lawrence than anyone (let alone her) could handle, but I don't know if I'd say she has an ego. If anything, she's her own harshest critic, and her laid-back demeanor can sometimes make you forget how completely lost she can get in a role. For me, at least, she definitely earned her spot on this list.

Oh, I would say she has an ego. She actually used to be polite - while being funny and clumsy and those J.Law mannerisms - but now it's not polite and it's just brash. I think that as her ego grew, the less polite she became.

The thing about Jennifer Lawrence is that I think she excels in challenging roles. I think she's bored playing the X-Men character with its rather constant storyline, leaving her a little more "phoned-in." Currently, she just finished a movie with Darren Aronofsky. I guess we will have to see where it goes, but Mother! certainly sounds like it could be a classic J.Law performance.

I suppose. Hopefully she'll tone it down a bit as she gets older. Maybe Passengers being a critical flop brought her back to Earth a bit.
Music is a world within itself, with a language we all understand - Sir Duke (1976)

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Re: AMF's 100 Greatest TV and Film Actors and Actresses of All Time (2017): Results

Postby Dexter » Thu Jun 22, 2017 1:01 am

Superpan wrote:That said, Dexter, I highly recommend The Band Wagon with Fred and Cyd. It's to Broadway what Singin' In The Rain is to movies and just as good. The only downside is that Cyd Charisse can't act her way out of the paper bag, but still dances quite well.

Neat write-ups Superpan, you're more well-versed in films than I am. It's nice to read your personal comments on each actor/actress. Gena Rowland

I admit I haven't seen The Bandwagon and will see it soon based on the comments. I am not really much of a musical fan so The Band Wagon along with 42nd Street, All That Jazz, Show Boat, Guys and Dolls, Seven Brides and Seven Brothers are perpetually in the back-burner in my watch list. That's why I didn't vote for Rogers or Astaire. I am not a film buff by any means, I try to watch one movie every night, so I watch roughly around 300 films per year most of them recent ones.

I cannot deny Jennifer Lawrence's acting talent and I think she will be considered a legend in the long haul as long as her excellent performances keep up with her admittedly increasing ego (several persons on this list have huge egos).

Next stop #65-61 with a couple of former child actors in tow...

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Re: AMF's 100 Greatest TV and Film Actors and Actresses of All Time (2017): Results

Postby Dexter » Thu Jun 22, 2017 1:10 am


65. Tom Cruise (1962-)



Points: 117.71

Votes: 5

Biggest Fan: Midaso (#5)

Bio: Taking up acting, Cruise found that it served a dual purpose: performing satiated his need for attention while the memorization aspect helped him come to grips with his dyslexia. His first big hit was Risky Business (1982), and Top Gun (1985) established him as an action star. He followed it up with dramatic turns in The Color of Money (1986) and Rain Man (1988) but critical acclaim came in Born on the Fourth of July (1989), which earned him an Oscar nomination and a Golden Globe. 1992's A Few Good Men earned him another Golden Globe nomination and in 1994, author Anne Rice famously reversed her objection to his casting as Lestat in Interview with the Vampire upon seeing his performance. In 1996, he first appeared as agent Ethan Hunt in the Mission: Impossible franchise. He further earned Oscar nominations and Golden Globe Awards for playing the titular Jerry McGuire (1996) and self-confident sex guru in Magnolia (1999). In 2005, Cruise became suddenly vocal about his beliefs in Scientology (his first wife, Mimi Rogers, introduced him to it and he credits it with helping him overcome dyslexia), denouncing psychiatry and modern medicine. This, along with his jumping up and down on the couch during the Oprah Winfrey Show, professing his love for the newly-Scientologist then-girlfriend, Katie Holmes, appeared to have alienated his viewers. Despite his personal drama, Cruise proved he was still a top draw in films like War of the Worlds (2005) and the Mission: Impossible sequels.



64. Natalie Portman (1981-)



Points: 119.65

Votes: 6

Biggest Fan: acroamor (#25)

Bio: Portman's child modeling stint led to a part in The Professional (1994), a debut which earned positive notices. Then she was cast as Queen Amidala in the Star Wars prequels. While continuing her career, Portman earned a degree in psychology from Harvard University. While V for Vendetta (2006) received mixed reviews, Portman's performance in it earned accolades. Later, she won a Golden Globe and earned an Oscar nomination for starring in Closer (2004). In 2010, her portrayal of a troubled ballerina in Black Swan received widespread critical acclaim and she earned her first Oscar for Best Actress, her second Golden Globe Award, the SAG Award and the BAFTA Award. In 2016, she portrayed First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy in the biopic Jackie and was nominated for an Oscar, a BAFTA, a Golden Globe, and SAG awards. With an Oscar before the age of 30, repeated comparisons to Audrey Hepburn, and beloved by critics, Portman has emerged as one of the most promising actresses of her generation.



63. Scarlett Johansson (1984-)



Points: 120.51

Votes: 3

Biggest Fan: bonnielaurel (#4)

Bio: Johansson began acting as a child, and her roles in The Horse Whisperer (1998) and Ghost World (2001) brought her critical acclaim. With Lost in Translation (2003), her touching performance as a girl who strikes a tentative friendship with a washed-up American actor left no doubts regarding her dramatic skills, and although a Best Actress Oscar nomination eluded her, she received a boatload of nods from critics' groups and the Golden Globes and won a BAFTA Award. Further acclaim followed in Girl with a Pearl Earring (2003), A Love Song for Bobby Long (2004), Match Point (2005). In 2012, she joined The Avengers as Natasha Romanoff, playing the character in several more films in the series. 2013 was a particularly good year for her with well-received performances for Don Jon, Her, and Under the Skin.



62. Jodie Foster (1962-)



Points: 120.73

Votes: 6

Biggest Fan: bonnielaurel (#18)

Bio: Often cited as one of the best actresses of her generation, Foster began her career at the age of three as a child model (she is the Coppertone girl whose swimsuit was being pulled down by a dog on the ads for the suntan lotion).Foster received an Oscar nomination at age 14 for her role as a child prostitute in Taxi Driver (1976). In 1981, John Hinckley Jr. attempted to assassinate President Reagan and insisted he'd done it to impress Foster - a re-creation of a similar incident in Taxi Driver. Hinckley's stalking of her while she was studying in Yale and the ensuing media coverage left her badly shaken. Foster struggled to transition to adult roles until winning widespread critical acclaim for her portrayal of a rape survivor in The Accused (1988), for which she won several awards, including an Oscar and a Golden Globe. She won her second Oscar three years later for The Silence of the Lambs. She founded her own production company in 1992 and in its first production she played the titular Nell (1994), gaining another Oscar nomination. After career setbacks in the early 2000s, which included the closing down of her production company, Foster starred mostly in thrillers from the Panic Room (2002) to The Brave One (2007). She has focused on directing in the 2010s.



61. Alan Rickman (1946-2016)



Points: 121.09

Votes: 4

Biggest Fan: StevieFan (#10)

Bio: Although he made his name playing ruthless, genteel villains like Die Hard's Hans Gruber (1988) and Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves' Sheriff of Nottingham (1991), Rickman proved himself equally remarkable in romantic, comic, and good-guy dramatic roles. An actor of brooding charisma who intones his lines in a deep, milky baritone, he began his career on-stage, building up a sizable resume before embarking on a film career. After 1991, the year he endeared himself as a markedly more sympathetic character in Truly, Madly, Deeply along with his delightfully nasty role in Robin Hood, his output slowed, although he made well-received appearances in Sense and Sensibility (1995) and in the title role of Rasputin: Dark Servant of Destiny (1996), for which he received Golden Globe and Emmy Awards. His next high-profile role came in the 2000s, when he took on the key part of Professor Severus Snape in the Harry Potter movies. Author J.K. Rowling specifically wanted him for the role, briefing him on unpublished backstory about the character to help him prepare for the role. He went on to play the role in all eight Harry Potter films.

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Re: AMF's 100 Greatest TV and Film Actors and Actresses of All Time (2017): Results

Postby StevieFan13 » Thu Jun 22, 2017 1:51 am

Yay, the first of my upper tier shows up! Losing Alan Rickman last year stung like hell, but for pure intimidation whenever he was onscreen, he couldn't be beaten. Especially Snape.
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Re: AMF's 100 Greatest TV and Film Actors and Actresses of All Time (2017): Results

Postby babydoll » Thu Jun 22, 2017 3:41 am

I just looked it up. Scarlett Johansson has NEVER been nominated for an Oscar. I'm surprised. She seems like someone who has just been nominated so many times. In my opinion, and BonnieLaurel's, she is the best actress of the new millennium so far.

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Re: AMF's 100 Greatest TV and Film Actors and Actresses of All Time (2017): Results

Postby bonnielaurel » Thu Jun 22, 2017 8:48 am

babydoll wrote:I just looked it up. Scarlett Johansson has NEVER been nominated for an Oscar. I'm surprised. She seems like someone who has just been nominated so many times. In my opinion, and BonnieLaurel's, she is the best actress of the new millennium so far.

It's one of the reasons why I don't take the Oscars seriously (next to Hitchcock and Kubrick never winning for best director). I remember being fascinated by her face after seeing her in Girl with a Pearl Earring. I later discovered that she's very versatile, with a range from comedy over drama and stage work to the impenetrable character in Under the Skin. She and Natalie Portman are the two youngest in my top 40.
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Re: AMF's 100 Greatest TV and Film Actors and Actresses of All Time (2017): Results

Postby Dexter » Thu Jun 22, 2017 9:57 am

I too thought Scarlett at least was nominated for Lost in Translation. The same goes to guy in the #60 spot, he nailed his Eternal Sunshine part. Below is #60-56 (still no Emma)...




60. Jim Carrey (1962-)



Points: 121.12

Votes: 6

Biggest Fan: Midaso (#15)

Bio: Carrey is best known for his highly energetic slapstick performances. He first gained recognition in 1990 as the "white guy" in the TV comedy In Living Color. 1994 proved to be "The Year of Carrey," with the release of three top-grossing comedy films to his credit: Ace Ventura: Pet Detective, The Mask, and Dumb and Dumber. From there, his expressive face, expert mimicry skills and physical brand of comedy kept the hits coming: Ace Ventura: When Nature Calls (1995), Batman Forever (1995), and Liar Liar (1997)(with 1996's The Cable Guy as a notable exception). Thereafter, he explored new territory with his lead role in the highly acclaimed The Truman Show (1998) and Man on the Moon (1999), with each garnering him a Golden Globe Award for Best Actor. Although the latter film did not do well, such was the strength of the his portrayal that his exclusion from the Best Actor nominations at that year's Oscars was a source of protest for several industry members. He returned to straight comedy the following year with Me, Myself & Irene and Dr. Seuss's How the Grinch Stole Christmas. He again received a Golden Globe nomination despite widespread critical-contempt for the latter film. Continuing to seek acceptance as a skilled dramatist, Carrey next appeared in the 2001 critical and box-office bomb The Majestic. Undeterred, 2004's mind-bending romantic-dramedy Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind featured what was arguably Carrey's most subtly complex and subdued performance to date. He would continue to explore dramatic roles such as the dark thriller The Number 23 (2007) and the critically acclaimed I Love You, Phillip Morris (2009).



59. Buster Keaton (1895-1966)



Points: 123.48

Votes: 6

Biggest Fan: BleuPanda (#25)

Bio: As legend has it, Keaton earned the name of "Buster" when he was 18 months old, after falling down a flight of stairs. Magician Harry Houdini scooped up the child and quipped, "That was a real buster!." Although his career lacked the resilience of Charlie Chaplin, Keaton may well have been the most gifted comedian to emerge from the cinema's silent era. His trademark was physical comedy with a consistently stoic, deadpan expression, earning him the nickname "The Great Stone Face." And while his skills as a gag writer and physical comic were remarkable, Keaton was one clown whose understanding of the film medium was just as great as his talent for taking a pratfall. He worked without interruption from 1920-1929 on a series of films that made him, arguably, the greatest actor–director in the history of the movies. Sherlock Jr. (1924), The General (1926), and The Cameraman (1928), remain highly regarded with Orson Welles stating that the second film was perhaps the greatest film ever made. With the advent of the talkies and loss of his artistic independence when he was hired by MGM, Keaton fell just as far as he rose, and he descended into alcoholism, ruining his family life. He recovered in the '40s, remarried, and revived his career to a degree as an honored comic performer for the rest of his life (see him in 1950's Sunset Boulvard and Charlie Chaplin's Limelight in 1952), earning an Academy Honorary Award in 1959.



58. Spencer Tracy (1900-1967)



Points: 127.84

Votes: 5

Biggest Fan: Dexter (#5)

Bio: Noted for his natural style and versatility, Tracy was nominated for nine Oscars for Best Actor and won two, sharing the record for nominations in that category with Laurence Olivier. Stocky, craggy-faced, and gruff, he was a most unlikely leading man, yet few stars enjoyed greater or more consistent success. An uncommonly versatile performer, his consistently honest and effortless performances made him a favorite of both audiences and critics throughout a career spanning well over three decades with films like Adam's Rib (1949), Father of the Bride (1950), Inherit the Wind (1960) and Judgment at Nuremberg (1961). His career flourished when he joined MGM though at first, the studio remained concerned about his perceived lack of sex appeal and continued giving the majority of plum roles to Clark Gable. But a series of hit films and an unprecedented consecutive Oscars for Captains Courageous (1937) and Boys Town (1938), he usurped Gable as MGM's top draw. In 1942, he appeared with Katharine Hepburn in Woman of the Year, beginning a popular partnership that produced nine movies over 25 years. He left MGM in 1955 but continued to work regularly despite an increasing weariness as he aged. His personal life was troubled, with a lifelong struggle against alcoholism and guilt over his son's deafness. He became estranged from his wife in the '30s, but never divorced, conducting a long-term relationship with Katharine Hepburn in private. He made his last film, Guess Who's Coming to Dinner in 1967, completed just 17 days before his death.



57. Marcello Mastroianni (1924-1996)



Points: 133.04

Votes: 7

Biggest Fan: BluePanda (#24)

Bio: The premier Italian actor of the postwar era, Mastroianni was among the most popular international stars in movie history. A speculative, almost introverted screen presence, he was the perfect foil for the arid, often puzzling films of directors like Michelangelo Antonioni and Federico Fellini, with whom he achieved some of his greatest success. His international breakthrough was Fellini's 1960 masterpiece, La Dolce Vita; portraying a jaded, disillusioned gossip columnist, became a worldwide success story. His next major role was in Antonioni's 1961 effort La Notte, where again his distanced, expressionless demeanor fit perfectly into the film's air of alienation and remote emotionality. It was a more assured Mastroianni who next resurfaced in Pietro Germi's Divorzio all'Italiana, also a major hit on the international arthouse circuit, where the actor won the BAFTA Best Foreign Actor award. Along with the great Jean-Paul Belmondo, Mastroianni had emerged as the most in-demand actor on the European continent. For 1963's masterful Otto e Mezzo, he reteamed with Fellini. A highly prolific performer, he continued to appear in films annually until the mid 90's, even if few managed to penetrate the international market. One film that did, 1987's Oci Ciornie, earned him honors from the jury at the Cannes Film Festival, and later won an Oscar nomination.



56. Christopher Walken (1943-)



Points: 142.04

Votes: 5

Biggest Fans: acroamor and Michel (#15)

Bio: A versatile character actor whose intense demeanor and slightly off-kilter delivery served him well in both comedies and dramas, Walken was at once one of the busiest and most respected actors of his generation, appearing in as many as five films in a year while still finding time for stage and TV work. His real breakthrough came in 1978, with his role as Nick in The Deer Hunter. Playing a small-town boy who is irreversibly scarred by his experiences in Vietnam, the role won Walken an Oscar for Best Supporting Actor. His willingness to take on edgy film characters helped earn him a loyal cult following, and small but showy roles in True Romance (1993) and Pulp Fiction (1994) gave his screen career a serious boost in the '90s. In the former film, he starred in a memorable scene where his hitman character tried to get some answers out of the lead's dad, played by Dennis Hopper. He received another Oscar nomination, along with BAFTA and SAG wins, for his performance in Catch Me if You Can (2002). He is also a popular guest-host of SNL. His most notable roles on the show include record producer Bruce Dickinson in the "I need more cowbell!" sketch, the double-entendre-named, disgraced Confederate officer Colonel Angus and, in multiple appearances, The Continental. As the 2000s progressed, Walken continued to take work in a variety of films, all the while maintaining his status as one of the quirkiest and most gifted supporting actors of his time.

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Re: AMF's 100 Greatest TV and Film Actors and Actresses of All Time (2017): Results

Postby Dexter » Fri Jun 23, 2017 9:59 am


55. Emma Stone (1988-)



Points: 142.79

Votes: 5

Biggest Fan: StevieFan (#6)

Bio: Stone is best known for her witty and charming roles in several popular comedies. She first made her mark in Superbad (2007). The combination of deadpan comic timing and undeniable beauty made her an instant hot property in Hollywood and her role in Zombieland (2009) gave her further positive media attention. By 2010, she was starring in her own comedy - a hilarious modern take on the Scarlet Letter called Easy A for which she earned a Golden Globe nomination. The next year she branched more full force into drama, starring in the critically acclaimed The Help. She became part of a superhero franchise when she took over the part of Gwen Stacy in 2012's The Amazing Spider-Man and its 2014 sequel. Her turn as the self-destructive daughter of a middle-age actor trying to make a comeback on the stage in Birdman earned her an Oscar nomination. Her star only grew brighter when she won an Oscar, BAFTA Award, and a Golden Globe Award for Best Actress for playing an aspiring actress in La La Land (2016).



54. Anthony Hopkins (1937-)



Points: 151.84

Votes: 6

Biggest Fan: Miguel (#9)

Bio: Hopkins pursued a stage career (he became a kind of protege of Laurence Olivier) before working in film in the late '60s, getting his break in The Lion in Winter (1968), playing Richard the Lionheart. But it was in 1991 that Hopkins, now well into his fifties, finally found himself shot to superstardom. His unforgettable, 17-minute performance as the infamous psychopath Hannibal Lector in The Silence of the Lambs frightened and wowed fans and critics alike. At the time he took the role, Hopkins had been considering retiring on films for a career on the stage. The fortuitous role resulted in not only an Oscar but a distinguished place in the popular consciousness as perhaps the number one on-screen villain of all time. He has since played the role again in the films' sequels. He wisely chose to follow up with The Remains of the Day (1993), for which he was nominated for another Oscar. He would be nominated again for Nixon (1995) and Amistad (1997). In 1993, he was knighted by the Queen for services to the arts and in 2006 was awarded the Golden Globes' Cecil B. DeMille Award for lifetime achievement. Since 2016, he has starred in the critically acclaimed HBO TV series Westworld.



53. Lucille Ball (1911-1989)



Points: 152.21

Votes: 3

Biggest Fan: JR (#1)

Bio: One of America's most beloved comedians, Ball is particularly known for her iconic TV show I Love Lucy. She got her start as a singer, model and film actress before venturing into TV and becoming one of America's top comedic actresses in I Love Lucy. From '51-'57, it was the most popular sitcom on television, and Ball, after years of career stops and starts, was firmly established as a megastar in her role of zany, disaster-prone Lucy Ricardo. In perhaps one of the most memorable TV episodes ever, I Love Lucy touched on the theme of pregnancy, when Lucy gave birth to Little Ricky on January 19, 1953, the same day the real-life Lucy delivered her son by cesarean. The story received more press coverage than President Eisenhower's inauguration. She went on to star in The Lucy Show and Here's Lucy while also becoming a top TV executive. She was nominated for 13 Primetime Emmy Awards, winning four times. She was also the recipient of the Golden Globe Cecil B. DeMille Award in 1979 and inducted into the Television Hall of Fame in 1984.



52. Edward Norton (1969-)



Points: 152.23

Votes: 5

Biggest Fan: BleuPanda (#5)

Bio: Norton attained instant film stardom with his debut in 1996's Primal Fear. For his thoroughly chilling breakthrough performance as an altar boy accused of murder,he was credited with saving an otherwise mediocre film and further rewarded with Golden Globe and Oscar nominations. He has gone on to further prove his worth in such films as The People vs. Larry Flynt (1996), American History X (1998), and Fight Club (1999). Norton's stunningly powerful portrayal of a reformed white supremacist in American History X won him another Oscar nomination. In 2014, he earned rave reviews for his supporting turn as a monstrously egotistical and hugely talented actor in Birdman, a part that earned him his third Oscar nomination and a slew of other industry accolades.



51. Naomi Watts (1968-)



Points: 152.39

Votes: 6

Biggest Fan: Petri (#9)

Bio: Naomi Watts had already been a working actress for over a decade when she earned notice as a promising Hollywood newcomer in Mulholland Drive (2001). It featured her as the blonde half of a female duo caught in a mystery of shifting identities. Though ignored for an Oscar nomination, Watts's tour-de-force dual performance earned her numerous accolades and critics' awards, igniting her career and earning praise as a rising "new" actress. The next year, she saw success in the horror remake The Ring (2002). She then received Oscar and SAG Award nominations for her role in the neo-noir 21 Grams (2003). For her lead role in the disaster film The Impossible (2012), she received her second Oscar and SAG Awards nominations and a Golden Globe nomination.

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Re: AMF's 100 Greatest TV and Film Actors and Actresses of All Time (2017): Results

Postby Superpan » Fri Jun 23, 2017 12:32 pm

I see we have a bit of a Birdman pile-up there. Also, yay Naomi Watts nearly made the top 50!

babydoll wrote: Yeah, I only mentioned Rita Hayworth and Cyd Charisse based on their dancing skills. Rita was fine at acting - Gilda wouldn't have been the same without her - but Cyd wasn't that good of an actress, to be kind. Ginger clearly beat both of them in the acting department. In fact, I don't dispute Ginger's position on this list. I only dispute the "She was considered to be Astaire's finest dancer" quote. And, yeah, Eleanor Powell was incredibly good as well. Sadly forgotten for the most part.


Just saw Gilda! Quite good though the ending let it down a bit. Yeah, poor thing about Eleanor Powell is that she was one of MGM's big musical stars pre-Arthur Freed and I always got the vibe the studio didn't know what to do with her besides make her dance. I'll have to keep my eye out for Golden Girls reruns!

Dexter, I definitely would prioritize All That Jazz out of the ones you listed. Just saw it a couple months ago and am still kicking myself for waiting so long to see Bob Fosse's masterpiece on self-destruction.

Problem with these mega-posts are that I miss all the conversation. Aw well, on to 80-60.

Greta Garbo - My favorite movie star who never made a masterpiece (as far as I've seen). A melodramatic actress with an over the top performance style who didn't even really enjoy the profession. Yet the movies we're made for. Her face alone has enchanted me and countless others since we first saw it. I remember one time when even the valedictorian of my class (not really a film guy) spent a whole class period transfixed by her doll's face.When that face moved either silently or talking in that smooth accent, it was one of the most empathetic in cinema. One of our most unlikely giants. Number of Films I've Seen: 4 Favorite Film: Ninotchka

The Marx Brothers (Groucho, Harpo, Chico) - A group I have a lot of respect for, but one whose filmography I've had a hard time prioritizing since everyone seems to agree that Duck Soup is constantly above all of their other films making it hard to get excited after the let-down of Night at the Opera. Now for thoughts on each brother....

Groucho: One of the great comedians of the past 150 years and a personal goal in matching one-liners
Chico: Inconsistent but solid support for Groucho
Harpo: Overrated pantomimist, okay harpist
Zeppo: Was there for a bit
Gummo: Was there for a shorter bit
Mannie: Died as a baby before the others were born, so bits can't get any shorter
Karl: Such a dirty Communist that no one will even acknowledge that he was related to them or even alive at the same time

Number of Films I've Seen: 3 Favorite Film: Duck Soup

Clark Gable - Yeah, I have complicated feelings about this guy. When I first saw him, I couldn't help but feel like his was a persona that hadn't aged well: a he-man macho guy who with a wise crack and his own two fists would put a woman in her place whether it be hitting her or even worse. This of course was further complicated by reading more of his actual time in Hollywood where he allegedly had a non-consensual one night stand with Loretta Young and was dogged by rumors that he may have had a deadly drunken DUI in 1936. Yet as I watch more of his performances, he really could act as he managed to bring out the vulnerabilities in his macho characters. These complicated feelings are part of why I think Rhett Butler was his greatest role. It was a perfect mirror to the scuzzy man he may very well have been.

Also, he and Groucho Marx inspired Bugs Bunny so it's interesting they ended up next to each other. Number of Films I've Seen: 7 Favorite Film: Gone With The Wind

Robert Mitchum - Achieved his biggest prominence in 50s Noir, an area I've never fully investigated. In Out of the Past, he does a good job as his easy-going self but of course, it's his masterfully evil depiction of Preacher Harry Powell in The Night of the Hunter that earns him screen immortality. Number of Films I've Seen: 2 Favorite Film: The Night of the Hunter

Shirley MacLaine - A quiet acting legend compared to her flashier brother. Running the whole range from impish (Artists and Models) to heartbreaking (The Apartment), I've never seen her be less than great in anything she's in even if it's been a while since she's made a great movie. But everyone needs The Apartment in their life, like, yesterday. Number of Films I've Seen: 6 Favorite Film: The Apartment

Géard Depardieu - Again I'm going to plead ignorance on this one as I have yet to get to The Last Metro or a couple of his other movies on my Kanopy watchlist. All I really know him for outside of his acting reputation is his big to-do over becoming a Russian citizen, but I suppose that's not really relevant here.

Judy Garland - Out of the classic MGM musical triumvirate (Astaire, Kelly, and her), she made the most musical films with only one or two in her frequently set-back 30 year career not featuring any singing. True, she may not be the most arresting star in the world but her ability to sell a song and be completely vulnerable on-screen earns her place in the pantheon. Heck, if she only ever did "Over the Rainbow," she'd still be secure as one of the greats. Number of Films I've Seen: 16 Favorite Film: The Wizard of Oz

Ian McKellen - While I have no particular love for The Lord of the Rings and the X-Men movies only haphazardly approach their true potential, there's no denying his amazing acting ability. He's authoritative, but knowing, and can break your heart at a moment's notice. Richard Harris didn't think he was talented, but I think we all do now. Number of Films I've Seen: 8 Favorite Film: X-Men: Days of Future Past

Isabelle Huppert - Yeah, this batch had a couple actors who I now realize I haven't seen a lot (or any) of their work. She was in 8 Women, a dopey but fun French musical pastiche of Douglas Sirk and Clue, but I can't remember her role all too clearly.

Robert Duvall - Oh man, I knew he had been around since the early sixties but it was only in college that I learned he had apparently appeared in half the major films of the seventies: M*A*S*H, The Godfather, The Conversation, The Seven-Per-Cent Solution, Network.... Main reason why I've never attempted to watch The Godfather Part III is knowing my favorite character, Tom Hagen, isn't in it. Number of Films I've Seen: 13 Favorite Film: The Godfather

Amy Adams - My family was more hyped than most for Enchanted as a former family member wrote the screenplay. Little did we know we were seeing the big breakthrough of one of the most definitive actresses of the past ten years. Adams is one of the most likable presences onscreen today with a range that few can scoff at. Though after all the dreary sci-fi she's been doing lately, it'd be nice to see her in a bubbly role that suited her as much as Princess Giselle did. Or, y'know, if they ever make a live-action remake of Up, she can be Ellie. Number of Films I've Seen: 12 Favorite Film: Her though Amelia Earhart or Princess Giselle might be my favorite performances

Robert Downey Jr. - If you had told me 10 years ago that Iron Man would all but supplant Spider-Man as Marvel's biggest superhero, I would have said you were crazy. But that's the case based sheerly on the magnetic talent of Robert Downey Jr. The thinking man's Harrison Ford (terrible description), Downey is both a master thespian and a master at being the action hero with the least stunts and most money. I'd wish he'd make more movies because I've never not enjoyed seeing his snarky and committed presence on screen. Number of Films I've Seen: 14 Favorite Film: Iron Man

Marlene Dietrich - While Garbo has always been my favorite of the two European sexually ambiguous stars of the 30s, I may have to finally break down and admit that Dietrich is the better "actor" per se (though talent isn't everything in this field, mind you). If Garbo was a goddess, Dietrich was the gutter, always inhabiting the darker and desperate corners of life where people struggled to get by. With a haunting singing voice and bewitching gaze, Dietrich worked with everyone from Orson Welles to Billy Wilder and David Bowie in a career anyone would be proud of. Number of Films I've Seen: 6 Favorite Film: The Song of Songs

Jake Gyllenhaal - Oh wow, I uh...I never noticed before, but I've never actually seen a Jake Gyllenhaal movie. I always thought I had, but apparently no. I don't get why, I never made it a mission not to but it just has never happened. I've seen the opening to Nightcrawler, maybe? But I've seen like 3 of his sister's films. This is weird. Number of Films I've Seen: 0 Favorite Film: That opening monologue on SNL in 2005 where he sang "You're Gonna Love Me"? I got nothing

Ginger Rogers - Ah, Ginger. I've already gone on her a bit up above, so clearly I think she's hilarious, moving, graceful, and all-around entertaining. Its often been said that Fred gave her class and she gave him sex, but that's a simplification for what Ginger does for Fred and in all her movies. While the majority of starlets in her day were glamour goddesses, Ginger was the rare character actor who broke out and kept her "ordinary girl next door" status. True, she could be glamorous but while Fred always had airs of the upper class, Ginger always had her feet cynically placed on the ground. That's what gave them such great chemistry.

Ironically, the Jennifer Lawrence conversation allowed me to notice the similarity between her current "predicament" and Rogers. Ginger also banked her person on her relatability and her popularity before finally winning an Oscar for a hard-hitting "real issues" movie that no one really talks about anymore. Afterwards, I sensed a bit more of an ego in the quality parts she turned down and her occasional phoning in of a performance. Of course, I won't be too harsh on her as she's still my favorite actress and she's always a delight in whatever film she does. Number of Films I've Seen: 28 Favorite Film: Swing Time

Tom Cruise - The opposite of Jake Gyllenhaal in that I haven't seen that much of his films. Don't get me wrong, he's talented enough but he seems to always have made it his mission to pick characters that seem like they sprung out of a screenwriting tutorial book. He was quite funny in Tropic Thunder though. Number of Films I've Seen: 2 Favorite Film: Haven't seen the beginning of Tropic Thunder, so if I don't count that, it's The Outsiders

Natalie Portman - Maybe it's because I've mainly seen her in the Star Wars Prequels and the Thor films (which she admits to being bored by), but I've never been a big fan.To be fair, Jackie wasn't all that great either though that wasn't really the actors' fail necessarily. I do still need to see Black Swan though. Number of Films I've Seen: 8 Favorite Film: Star Wars Episode III: The Revenge of the Sith

Scarlett Johansson - If Amy Adams is one of the most definitive actresses of the past ten years, Scarlett perhaps is. At first, I was thinking that maybe she just has the best agent in Hollywood in that she's able to be in half of the big Hollywood films but holy cow, she won me over with Lucy. She can do superheroes, she can do action, she can do comedy, she can do indie sci-fi and, with rare exception, she's quite good. That consistency can't be all happenstance, can it? Number of Films I've Seen: 13 Favorite Film: The Spongebob Squarepants Movie

Jodie Foster - I've only seen her in Taxi Driver and The Silence of the Lambs. She's quite good in both. Perhaps I'll have more to say after Freaky Friday airs on TCM next month. Number of Films I've Seen: 2 Favorite Film: Taxi Driver

Alan Rickman - Losing him and Bowie in the same week was so crushing. Very few people were born to play a villain as Alan Rickman was. Yet when he finally broke through the deeply covered vulnerability, you always felt for him. It's his work that helped make Severus Snape the most interesting character in the Harry Potter universe. Number of Films I've Seen: 13 Favorite Film: Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street

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Re: AMF's 100 Greatest TV and Film Actors and Actresses of All Time (2017): Results

Postby Dexter » Sat Jun 24, 2017 10:23 am

Superpan: I'll watch both The Band Wagon and All That Jazz the weekend after this is finished, thanks I haven't been this eager to watch an oldie for quite some time. Add me as one of those enchanted by Garbo's looks and facial expressions that the talkies didn't diminish her appeal. A current actress that comes close in classic looks for me is Cate Blanchett. Groucho Marx for me is what made The Marx Brothers indispensable and several voters placed him solely instead of the brothers as a collective but their gags wouldn't be as effective without his other brothers. The French put out some unconventional but fascinating films and the 70s films I like usually has Gerard Depardieu in it like Going Places and Get Out Your Handkerchiefs. Isabelle Huppert is a fairly new discovery staring from the wrenching The Piano Teacher. The rest of the list are a mix of new and old favorites though I still think Robert Mitchum is an underrated actor, I can't believe that he was nominated for only one Oscar for his career.

I'll resume my countdown tomorrow so before then here are a few tidbits:

- All are or were Hollywood/Euro stars with one notable exception
- All are movie stars except for one who is best known as a TV star
- Out of the top 50 thespians, only 11 are women
- It's an all-male top 10
- Proving that experience matters, the youngest person in the top 50 was born in 1975
- Four entrants are also accomplished directors (one directing the film cited as the greatest of all time)
- The top 50 includes four persons of color (I'm still bummed that Viola did not make the cut)
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Re: AMF's 100 Greatest TV and Film Actors and Actresses of All Time (2017): Results

Postby StevieFan13 » Sat Jun 24, 2017 11:28 am

Bummer about the lack of women in the top 10 (or half the top 50). I feel like I have at least a decent idea of who some of them are, and if I know my film history, I have a pretty good idea which woman is going to at least crack the top 20 (and she's good at singing ABBA songs).
Also: yay, my top pick made the top 50!
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Re: AMF's 100 Greatest TV and Film Actors and Actresses of All Time (2017): Results

Postby Superpan » Sat Jun 24, 2017 7:03 pm

True, Groucho needed the support. I'll have to check out Going Places and The Piano Teacher, the latter I've heard quite good things about.

Yeah, shame about the lack of women. Then again, I could see this coming from my ballot as I generally put more obscure actresses near the top than actors. Now off to the Wikipedia years in film to see who was born in 1975!

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Re: AMF's 100 Greatest TV and Film Actors and Actresses of All Time (2017): Results

Postby babydoll » Sat Jun 24, 2017 7:39 pm

StevieFan13 wrote:Bummer about the lack of women in the top 10 (or half the top 50). I feel like I have at least a decent idea of who some of them are, and if I know my film history, I have a pretty good idea which woman is going to at least crack the top 20 (and she's good at singing ABBA songs).

I am sincerely praying that my #2 was actually the woman who made it in, not that overrated actress that is supposedly "good at singing ABBA songs."

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Re: AMF's 100 Greatest TV and Film Actors and Actresses of All Time (2017): Results

Postby bootsy » Sat Jun 24, 2017 7:48 pm

babydoll wrote:
StevieFan13 wrote:Bummer about the lack of women in the top 10 (or half the top 50). I feel like I have at least a decent idea of who some of them are, and if I know my film history, I have a pretty good idea which woman is going to at least crack the top 20 (and she's good at singing ABBA songs).

I am sincerely praying that my #2 was actually the woman who made it in, not that overrated actress that is supposedly "good at singing ABBA songs."

Don't know who this is. Not sure if I'll be glad when I find out who this is or not. :o

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Re: AMF's 100 Greatest TV and Film Actors and Actresses of All Time (2017): Results

Postby babydoll » Sat Jun 24, 2017 8:21 pm

bootsy wrote:
babydoll wrote:
StevieFan13 wrote:Bummer about the lack of women in the top 10 (or half the top 50). I feel like I have at least a decent idea of who some of them are, and if I know my film history, I have a pretty good idea which woman is going to at least crack the top 20 (and she's good at singing ABBA songs).

I am sincerely praying that my #2 was actually the woman who made it in, not that overrated actress that is supposedly "good at singing ABBA songs."

Don't know who this is. Not sure if I'll be glad when I find out who this is or not. :o

Meryl Streep.

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Re: AMF's 100 Greatest TV and Film Actors and Actresses of All Time (2017): Results

Postby bootsy » Sun Jun 25, 2017 2:23 am

babydoll wrote:
bootsy wrote:
babydoll wrote:I am sincerely praying that my #2 was actually the woman who made it in, not that overrated actress that is supposedly "good at singing ABBA songs."

Don't know who this is. Not sure if I'll be glad when I find out who this is or not. :o

Meryl Streep.

Ah ok. Thanks.

I can't say I'm a fan or not I've never seen a Meryl Streep movie in it's entirety. So I've never really given her a chance.

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Re: AMF's 100 Greatest TV and Film Actors and Actresses of All Time (2017): Results

Postby Dexter » Sun Jun 25, 2017 6:01 am


50. John Wayne (1907-1979)



Points: 152.45

Votes: 5

Biggest Fan: babydoll (#11)

Bio: One of the most popular actors and an icon to this day, Wayne, for nearly a decade, toiled in B-movie westerns, even playing a singing cowboy. During this time however, he started developing his man of action persona. He got his big break in the brilliant Stagecoach (1939), nearly stealing a picture filled with Oscar-caliber performances. His other well-known Western roles include Red River (1948), which provided him with an opportunity to show his talents as an actor, not just an action hero, Sands of Iwo Jima (1949), which garnered him his first Oscar nomination, The Searchers (1956), often considered to contain his finest and most complex performance, and The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (1962). He is also remembered for his roles in The Quiet Man (1952), Rio Bravo (1959), and The Longest Day (1962). He won an Oscar for the 1969 version of True Grit.



49. Peter Sellers (1925-1980)



Points: 153.08

Votes: 7

Biggest Fan: Michel (#6)

Bio: One of the greatest comic talents, Sellers had an exceptional gift for losing himself in a character - so much so that, beyond his remarkable skill as a performer and his fondness for the humor of the absurd, it's difficult to draw a connection between many of his best performances. His versatility, he played Chief Inspector Clouseau in the Pink Panther films (1963-1978) for which he won a BAFTA Award with as much ease as Clare Quilty in Lolita (1962), enabled him to portray a wide range of comic characters using different accents and guises. He would often assume multiple roles within the same film, frequently with contrasting temperaments and styles, as exemplified in the three roles he played in Dr. Strangelove (1964) for which he was nominated for an Oscar. His other Oscar Best Actor nomination was in Being There (1979). Satire and black humor were also major features of many of his films, and his performances had a strong influence on a number of later comedians.



48. Bill Murray (1950-)



Points: 159.80

Votes: 8

Biggest Fan: Michel (#26)

Bio: Murray developed a fabulously insincere and sleazy comic persona in his stint with SNL, earning him his first Emmy Award, which was put to good use in his first major film, the 1979 hit Meatballs. 1980's Caddyshack was a masterpiece of slob comedy, with Murray memorable as a maniacal rangeboy hunting the gopher that is slowly destroying his golf course. Blockbusters like Stripes (1981) and Ghostbusters (1984) followed. In 1993, he earned his strongest notices to date for Groundhog Day. Beginning with 1994's acclaimed Ed Wood, in which he appeared as a transsexual, Murray's career choices grew increasingly eccentric which allowed him to stretch from low-brow slapstick farce to intelligent adult drama. In 1998, he took on a similarly eccentric role in Rushmore which won him the Best Supporting Actor award from the New York Film Critics Circle. In 2003, he essayed the role that would offer what was perhaps his most heartfelt combination of personal drama and touching comedy to date in Lost in Translation. His low-key charm proved the perfect balance to co-star Scarlett Johansson's youthful malaise. Virtually across the board, critics were bowled over by the subtle depth of his performance, leading to Best Actor honors in most major awards, the one that remained elusive was Oscar (though he was nominated). His performance in the 2005's Broken Flowers also netted virtually unanimous acclaim and for the HBO miniseries Olive Kitteridge (2014), he won his second Emmy Award.



47. Brad Pitt (1963-)



Points: 159.94

Votes: 6

Biggest Fan: prosecutorgodot (#8)

Bio: Pitt first gained recognition, mostly for his physical appeal, as a cowboy hitchhiker in the road movie Thelma & Louise (1991). Lead roles in big-budget productions came in River Runs Through It (1992), Legends of the Fall (1994), and Interview with the Vampire (1994). He gave critically acclaimed performances in Seven and 12 Monkeys (both 1995), the latter earning him a Golden Globe Award and an Oscar nomination. He also starred in the cult film Fight Club (1999) and the heist film Ocean's Eleven (2001) and its sequels. He received his second and third Oscar nominations for The Curious Case of Benjamin Button (2008) and Moneyball (2011).



46. Denzel Washington (1954-)



Points: 160.13

Votes: 5

Biggest Fan: bootsy (#7)

Bio: One of Hollywood's most magnetic leading men, Washington's poise and radiantly sane intelligence permeate whatever film he is in, be it a socially conscious drama, biopic, or suspense thriller. More importantly, Washington's efforts have done much to dramatically expand the range of dramatic roles given to African-American actors and actresses. His major career break was in the TV hospital drama St. Elsewhere (1982-88) for which he won critical raves and film offers. Oscar nominations followed including his portrayals of real-life figures such as activists Steve Biko in Cry Freedom (1987), Muslim minister and Malcolm X in Malcolm X (1992) as well as boxer Rubin Carter in The Hurricane (1999) and two that resulted in wins: for the historical war drama film Glory (1989) and for his role as a corrupt cop in the crime thriller Training Day (2001). Further Oscar nominations came for Flight (2012) and Fences (2016). In 2016, Washington was selected as the recipient for the Cecil B. DeMille Lifetime Achievement Award at the 73rd Golden Globe Awards.



45. Gary Cooper (1901-1961)



Points: 160.32

Votes: 4

Biggest Fan: babydoll (#1)

Bio: Cooper was a major movie star from the end of the silent film era through the end of the golden age of Classical Hollywood. His screen persona appealed strongly to both men and women, and his range of performances included roles in most major movie genres. Cooper's ability to project his own personality onto the characters he played contributed to his appearing natural, authentic, and understated on screen. The screen persona he sustained throughout his career represented the ideal American hero. He was nominated for Best Actor Oscar in Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936), The Pride of the Yankees (1942), and For Whom the Bell Tolls (1943), and winning for his roles in Sergeant York (1941) and High Noon (1952). He also received an Academy Honorary Award for his career achievements in 1961.



44. Orson Welles (1915-1985)



Points: 160.86

Votes: 4

Biggest Fans: Superpan and Petri (#6)

Bio: Welles began his career as a stage actor before going on to radio, creating his unforgettable version of War of the Worlds. In 1941, he wrote, directed and starred in his debut film Citizen Kane (1941) which remains one of the most influential films ever made with its striking use of revolutionary film techniques. It was nominated for 9 Oscars including Best Actor for Welles. He followed it up with 12 other feature films, the most acclaimed of which include The Magnificent Ambersons (1942), Touch of Evil (1958), and Chimes at Midnight (1966). However, Welles never liked the results and blamed the studio heads for re-editing his films, they in turn portray him as someone who is impossible to deal with. He fell out of favor with Hollywood and had to make money as an actor to help finance his films and his expensive lifestyle; his acting talents enhanced such films as The Third Man (1949). Not that his acting was without controversy. Some critics would always accuse him of hamming, of hogging the limelight - especially when he was also the director. But many professionals and a large public found his presence electrifying. ''He has the manner of a giant with the look of a child,'' said Jean Cocteau, ''a lazy activeness, a mad wisdom, a solitude encompassing the world.''



43. Kate Winslet (1975-)



Points: 161.56

Votes: 8

Biggest Fan: acroamor (#8)

Bio: A handful of actresses carry such a wellspring of inner grace and presence that they appear destined for celebrity from birth. Natalie Wood had it, as did Elizabeth Taylor and Grace Kelly; many would doubtless place Kate Winslet among their ranks. A tender 11 when she commenced her formal dramatic training, 19 when she debuted cinematically in Heavenly Creatures to critical praise, and 20 when she received her first Oscar nomination for Sense and Sensibility (1995), Winslet never "ascended" to stardom; she became a star overnight. The possessor of an hourglass-figured, full-lipped beauty that lends itself effortlessly to costume dramas, Winslet was roundly hailed by the press for standing in stark, proud contrast to her more conventional Hollywood peers. She is the youngest person to receive six Oscar nominations; her other nominations are in Titanic (1997), Iris (2001), Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004), Little Children (2007) and won an Oscar for The Reader (2008). Winslet later won a SAG, Golden Globe and an Emmy Award for her role in the HBO miniseries Mildred Pierce (2011) as well as another Oscar nomination for her role in Steve Jobs (2015).



42. Fred Astaire (1899-1987)



Points: 163.87

Votes: 4

Biggest Fan: Superpan (#4)

Bio: Few would argue with the opinion that Astaire was the most popular, if not the greatest, dancer ever seen on film. Light on his feet, he revolutionized film musical with his elegant and seemingly effortless dance style. He may have made dancing look easy, but he was a well-known perfectionist, and his work was the product of endless hours of practice. When Hollywood beckoned in the 30s, he was initially dismissed with "Can't act; slightly bald; can dance a little." Finally, he landed a small role in 1933's Dancing Lady and matched up with another dancer, Ginger Rogers, as supporting players for Flying Down to Rio, that same year. Their dance number stole the movie and they appeared in several more movies together and became film's most beloved dance team. Though they were friends, both yearned to be appreciated as individuals rather than a part of a team. Splitting with Rogers, he performed with such leading ladies as Rita Hayworth, Cyd Charisse, Judy Garland, Leslie Caron and Audrey Hepburn in such films as The Band Wagon (1953) and Funny Face (1957). While he was superb as a troubled, suicidal scientist in On the Beach (1959) and was nominated for an Oscar for his supporting role in The Towering Inferno (1974), few of his later films took full advantage of his acting abilities. In 1981, he was honored with a Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Film Institute.



41. Catherine Deneuve (1943-)



Points: 164.50

Votes: 4

Biggest Fans: babydoll (#8) and Superpan (#9)

Bio: A model of Gallic elegance, cultivated lust object for art house filmgoers everywhere, and one of the best-respected actresses in the French film industry, Deneuve made her reputation playing a series of beautiful ice maidens. She made her film debut in 1957 and first came to prominence in the 1964 musical The Umbrellas of Cherbourg. The burst of stardom that accompanied her portrayal led to two of her archetypal ice maiden roles, first in the terrifying Repulsion in 1965 and then in 1967 with Belle de Jour. Her startling portrayal of an icy, sexually adventurous housewife in the latter film helped to establish her as one of the most remarkable and compelling actresses of her generation and she was nominated for the BAFTA Award. She performance in Tristana (1970) was also well-received. She won the French Academy of Cinema Awards for her starring roles in The Last Metro (1980) and Inochine (1992), which also garnered her an Oscar nomination, and was nominated for Place Vendôme (1998). In 2000 Deneuve received much critical attention when cast alongside Bjork in the melancholy musical Dancer in the Dark.
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Re: AMF's 100 Greatest TV and Film Actors and Actresses of All Time (2017): Results

Postby StevieFan13 » Sun Jun 25, 2017 1:47 pm

I'll admit, I didn't expect Kate Winslet to make the top 50. But I'm glad she did! OK, so my #1's in at least the top 40.
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Re: AMF's 100 Greatest TV and Film Actors and Actresses of All Time (2017): Results

Postby Listyguy » Sun Jun 25, 2017 1:51 pm

Brad Pitt was born in 1963, not 1950.

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Re: AMF's 100 Greatest TV and Film Actors and Actresses of All Time (2017): Results

Postby prosecutorgodot » Sun Jun 25, 2017 8:17 pm

#48 Bill Murray (8) and #43 Kate Winslet (8) are the first entries with more than half of the 15 votes.

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Re: AMF's 100 Greatest TV and Film Actors and Actresses of All Time (2017): Results

Postby Nick » Sun Jun 25, 2017 9:23 pm

Oh yeah, and Laurence Olivier. Excited to see where he places.

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Re: AMF's 100 Greatest TV and Film Actors and Actresses of All Time (2017): Results

Postby babydoll » Sun Jun 25, 2017 9:25 pm

Nick wrote:Oh yeah, and Laurence Olivier. Excited to see where he places.

There's a good chance he actually might not place.

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Re: AMF's 100 Greatest TV and Film Actors and Actresses of All Time (2017): Results

Postby Nick » Mon Jun 26, 2017 1:16 am

babydoll wrote:
Nick wrote:Oh yeah, and Laurence Olivier. Excited to see where he places.

There's a good chance he actually might not place.


That'd certainly be regrettable...

But hey, this is what I get for not voting.


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