Télam (Argentina) - Top songs of each artist

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Blanco
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Télam (Argentina) - Top songs of each artist

Post by Blanco » Wed Oct 02, 2013 12:52 am

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In http://www.telam.com.ar/ they have a section dedicated to anniversaries of all kinds. When it comes to music, they tend to create a top of the best songs of the celebrated artist. They update often, so new tops are added every few days. If these lists are eligible, I'll try to keep them updated.
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Top 10 - Víctor Jara
Source
Chilean singer, songwriter and theater director, was heavily involved with the political reality of his country through his membership in the Communist Party and became a leader of the protest song. He was kidnapped by the forces of Augusto Pinochet, the day of the coup that overthrew Salvador Allende, on September 11, 1973. After being tortured, was murdered in the Chile State on September 16.

1. Zamba del che - Víctor Jara (1969)
2. Plegaria a un labrador - Víctor Jara (1969)
3. Cuando voy al trabajo - Víctor Jara
4. Preguntas por Puerto Montt - Víctor Jara
5. Yo no canto por cantar - Víctor Jara
6. Vientos del pueblo - Víctor Jara
7. Te recuerdo, Amanda - Víctor Jara (1969)
8. Juan sin tierra - Víctor Jara
9. El derecho a vivir en paz - Víctor Jara (1971)
10. Manifiesto - Víctor Jara


Top 10 - Roberto "el Polaco" Goyenche
Source
Owner of a personal style which was accentuated over the years, Roberto "el Polaco" Goyenche was born on January 29, 1926. His career began in 1944 in the orchestra of Raúl Kaplun. Soon he moved to sing under the instructions of Horacio Salgán. His most outstanding performance was with Aníbal Troilo, this period is the pinnacle of his career. However, he was later consecrated as a soloist and recognition would come in the maturity of his voice for not leaving until he reached his death on August 27, 1994.

1. Malevaje - Roberto Goyenche
2. Balada para un loco - Roberto "el Polaco" Goyenche
3. La última curda - Roberto "el Polaco" Goyenche
4. El motivo - Roberto "el Polaco" Goyenche
5. Desencuentro - Roberto "el Polaco" Goyenche
6. Naranjo en flor - Roberto "el Polaco" Goyenche
7. Garúa - Roberto "el Polaco" Goyenche
8. Mano a mano - Roberto "el Polaco" Goyenche
9. Barrio pobre - Roberto "el Polaco" Goyenche
10. El último farol - Roberto "el Polaco" Goyenche


Top 10 - Sandro
Source
Composer of popular music classics of Argentina, Roberto Sanchez, better known as Sandro, began his career in 1963 and for nearly 50 years belonged to a public that adored him not only for his seductive interpretations, but also for the warmth with which received its most persistent fans. Crowd Idol, doing unmatched records as it was filling 40 consecutive Grand Rex, Sandro died in early 2010 because of a chronic lung disease that afflicted him for more than 10 years, although the echoes of his work can be heard in a society that became myth that kid of Valentín Alsina born on August 19, 1945.

1. Penumbras - Sandro (1969)
2. Quiero llenarme de ti - Sandro (1968)
3. Una muchacha y una guitarra - Sandro (1968)
4. Porque yo te amo - Sandro
5. Trigal - Sandro (1969)
6. Rosa Rosa - Sandro (1969)
7. Soy gitano - Sandro (1971)
8. Las manos - Sandro (1969)
9. Mi amigo el Puma - Sandro (1973)
10. Amor en Buenos Aires (1990)

Top 10 - Hugo del Carril
Source
Popular singer, actor, director and film producer, his mellifluous, melodic and envelope voice, turned the tangos of the time in great interpretative gems. It was in the films he produced and directed where he realized his lifelong commitment to the cause of the dispossessed. Considered a symbol of Peronism not only for his public activism and membership but their widespread version of the party march, he was jailed in 1955 and then had to undergo several years of exiles and proscriptions. He was born in Buenos Aires November 30, 1912 and died on August 13, 1989.

1. Sus ojos se cerraron - Hugo del Carril
2. Mano a mano - Hugo del Carril
3. El día que me quieras - Hugo del Carril
4. Yira yira - Hugo del Carril
5. Cafetín de Buenos Aires - Hugo del Carril
6. Las cuarenta - Hugo del Carril
7. Nostalgias - Hugo del Carril
8. Porque la quise tanto - Hugo del Carril
9. Uno - Hugo del Carril
10. Amargura - Hugo del Carril & Libertad Lamarque


Top 10 - Osvaldo Pugliese
Source
Pianist, conductor and composer, innovator of the tango with energetic and rhythmic phrasing, started professionally at age 15. In his career came to have great popularity, and was the author of great songs. For years his orchestra was banned for broadcasting political censorship, but this did not diminish his prestige. He was born in the Buenos Aires neighborhood of Villa Crespo on December 2, 1905 and died in Buenos Aires on July 25, 1995.

1. Recuerdo - Osvaldo Pugliese
2. La yumba - Osvaldo Pugliese
3. Negracha - Osvaldo Pugliese
4. Malandraca - Osvaldo Pugliese
5. La beba - Osvaldo Pugliese
6. Adiós Bardi - Osvaldo Pugliese
7. Recién - Osvaldo Pugliese
8. Barro - Osvaldo Pugliese
9. Una vez - Osvaldo Pugliese
10. El encopao - Osvaldo Pugliese



Top 10 - Aníbal Troilo
Source
On July 11, 1914 was born the most famous Argentine bandoneon player, nicknamed "Pichuco". In his honor, the Bandoneón Day was established. The first instrument he had was at age 10 and at 11 he made his first performance. At 14, he had formed a quintet and thereafter formed bands and played with the best musicians of his time. He composed many tangos, many of them co-authored with Homero Manzi. He died on May 18, 1975.

1. Quejas de bandoneón - Aníbal Troilo
2. Nocturno a mi barrio - Aníbal Troilo
3. Sur - Aníbal Troilo
4. Chiqué - Aníbal Troilo
5. Palomita blanca - Aníbal Troilo
6. Mi noche triste - Aníbal Troilo
7. Danzarín - Aníbal Troilo
8. El motivo - Aníbal Troilo
9. Barrio de tango - Aníbal Troilo
10. Buenas noches, Buenos Aires - Aníbal Troilo

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Re: Télam (Argentina) - Top songs of each artist

Post by Blanco » Wed Oct 02, 2013 1:26 am

Top 10 - Astor Piazzolla
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Controversial, discussed and misunderstood, not only the most famous tango musician in the world, but a composer admired by notable international soloists. Born in Mar del Plata on March 11, 1921, and died on July 4, 1992.

1. Adiós, Nonino - Astor Piazzolla
2. Balada para un loco - Astor Piazzolla
3. Libertango - Astor Piazzolla
4. Decarísimo - Astor Piazzolla
5. Buenos Aires hora cero - Astor Piazzolla
6. Revirado - Astor Piazzolla
7. Verano porteño - Astor Piazzolla
8. Chiquilín de Bachín - Astor Piazzolla
9. La evasión - Astor Piazzolla
10. Milonga del ángel - Astor Piazzolla


Top 10 - Horacio Salgán
Source
Pianist, conductor and composer, is one of the great innovators of tango. Member of the orchestra of Roberto Firpo, debuted at 20 years as arranger at the Miguel Calo's orchestra. He later led the Quinteto Real, that, composed by Enrique Mario Francini, Pedro Láurenz, Ubaldo De Mess and Rafael Ferro, was one of the strongest groups in the history of tango. He was born on June 15, 1916.

1. A fuego lento - Horacio Salgán
2. A Don Agustín Bardi - Horacio Salgán
3. Aquellos tiempos camperos - Horacio Salgán
4. Tierra querida - Horacio Salgán
5. Fuimos - Horacio Salgán
6. Taquito militar - Horacio Salgán
7- Los mareados - Horacio Salgán
8. La cumparsita - Horacio Salgán
9. Palomita blanca - Horacio Salgán
10. Boedo - Horacio Salgán

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Re: Télam (Argentina) - Top songs of each artist

Post by Blanco » Wed Oct 02, 2013 2:41 am

Top 10 - Rubén Juárez
Source
The May 31, 2010 died this extraordinary bandoneon player, singer and composer. He was the author, among other songs, of "Candombe en negro y plata", "Cuestión de ganas", "Mi bandoneón y yo," "¿Qué tango hay que cantar?", "Vientos del ochenta", and have recorded, with his bandoneon, memorable versions most famous tangos. He was born in the province of Cordoba Ballesteros on November 5, 1947.

1. El último farol - Rubén Juárez
2. Tinta roja - Rubén Juárez
3. Desencuentro - Rubén Juárez
4. Adiós Nonino - Rubén Juárez
5. Pasional - Rubén Juárez
6. Mi bandoneón y yo - Rubén Juárez
7. Último tango en Buenos Aires - Rubén Juárez
8. Uno - Rubén Juárez
9. Alma en pena - Rubén Juárez
10. Cambalache - Rubén Juárez


Top 11 - Atahualpa Yupanqui
Source
The May 23, 1992 died in France the greatest folklorist of Argentina. Poet, guitarist, singer, songwriter, political activist long committed to the cause of the dispossessed and persecuted, throughout his life suffered censorship and threats of the most varied sectors. He was the author of a vast work, both musical and literary. He was born in Parchment, on January 31, 1908, with the name of Héctor Roberto Chavero.

1. El arriero - Atahualpa Yupanqui
2. La añera - Atahualpa Yupanqui
3. Luna tucumana - Atahualpa Yupanqui
4. Milonga del solitario - Atahualpa Yupanqui
5. Los hermanos - Atahualpa Yupanqui
6. Camino del indio - Atahualpa Yupanqui
7. Los ejes de mi carreta - Atahualpa Yupanqui
8. Milonga del peón de campo - Atahualpa Yupanqui
9. Sin caballo y en Montiel - Atahualpa Yupanqui
10. El Alazán - Atahualpa Yupanqui
11. Preguntitas sobre Dios - Atahualpa Yupanqui

Note: The number 11 was not chosen by the staff of Télam. It was voted by the Telam community on Facebook and Twitter.


Top 10 - Floreal Ruíz
Source
Subtle and delicate singer with perfect diction, he was one of the great tango voices from the forties, reaching its fullness with the Anibal Troilo's orchestra. He was born in Buenos Aires on March 29, 1916 and died on April 17, 1978.

1. A quién le puede importar - Floreal Ruíz
2. Naranjo en flor - Floreal Ruíz
3. Un infierno - Floreal Ruíz
4. Marioneta - Floreal Ruíz
5. Yuyo verde - Floreal Ruíz
6. Vieja amiga - Floreal Ruíz
7. Flor de lino - Floreal Ruíz
8. Mis amigos de ayer - Floreal Ruíz
9. Romance de barrio - Floreal Ruíz
10. Desvelo - Floreal Ruíz

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Re: Télam (Argentina) - Top songs of each artist

Post by Blanco » Wed Oct 02, 2013 8:47 pm

Top 10 - Suma Paz
Source
Poet, writer, performer and composer, Bachelor of Philosophy and Letters at the Universidad del Litoral, author of numerous songs, was widely known for their exceptional performances of sureras milongas, as well as her dissemination of the work of Atahualpa Yupanqui. He was born on April 5, 1939 and died on April 8, 2009.

1. El árbol que tú olvidaste - Suma Paz
2. A lo Pampa - Suma Paz
3. Desvelo - Suma Paz
4. Para el que mira sin ver - Suma Paz
5. Leña verde - Suma Paz
6. El alazán - Suma Paz
7. Monte callado - Suma Paz
8. Le tengo rabia al silencio - Suma Paz
9. La añera - Suma Paz
10. Adiós Tucumán - Suma Paz


Top 10 - Fito Páez
Source
The rosarian musician was born on March 13, 1963. It is one of the most popular performers and composers of Argentine rock. He played with Charly Garcia and Luis Alberto Spinetta, and holds the record of having created "El amor después del amor", the biggest selling album in the history of local rock. He has published more than 17 albums.

1. Del 63 - Fito Páez
2. 11 y 6 - Fito Páez
3. Ciudad de pobres corazones - Fito Páez
4. Polaroid de locura ordinaria - Fito Páez
5. Fue amor - Fito Páez
6. Tumbas de la gloria - Fito Páez
7. Tema de Piluso - Fito Páez
8. Cadáver exquisito - Fito Páez
9. Llueve sobre mojado - Fito Páez
10. El diablo de tu corazón - Fito Páez


Top 10 - Pappo
Source
Guitarist, singer and songwriter, Norberto Hannibal Napolitano, better known as Pappo and nicknamed "El Carpo" was the creator of bands like Pappo's Blues and Riff, and member of iconic groups such as Los Gatos, Los Abuelos de la Nada and La Pesada del Rock and Roll. He also played with musicians from the size of John Bonham, Lemmy Kilmister, and the legendary B. B. King. He was born on March 10, 1950 and passed away in an accident with his motorbike, February 25, 2005.

1. Sucio y desprolijo - Pappo (1973)
2. Pantalla del nuevo mundo - Riff (1982)
3. El hombre suburbano - Pappo (1971)
4. Desconfío de la vida - Pappo (1972)
5. Adónde está la libertad - Pappo (1971)
6. Susy Cadillac - Riff (1982)
7. Ruedas de metal - Riff (1981)
8. Sube a mi voiture - Riff (1992)
9. Fiesta cervezal - Pappo (1973)
10. Ruta 66 - Pappo (1995)

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Re: Télam (Argentina) - Top songs of each artist

Post by Blanco » Wed Oct 02, 2013 10:45 pm

Top 10 - Jorge Cafrune
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It was one of the most popular singers of Argentina. When riding a horse towards Yapeyú, February 1st, 1978, to pay tribute to San Martín, he was hit by a truck in Benavídez and died after a few hours. A few days earlier, in Cosquín Festival, he performed "Zamba de mi esperanza", banned by the military dictatorship. According to testimonies of the report "Nunca Más", after the presentation in Cosquín his death was planned to take place in the concentration camp La Perla.

1. Zamba de mi esperanza - Jorge Cafrune
2. Mi luna cautiva - Jorge Cafrune
3. Coplas del payador perseguido - Jorge Cafrune
4. Que seas vos - Jorge Cafrune
5. Paisaje de Catamarca - Jorge Cafrune
6. No te puedo olvidar - Jorge Cafrune
7. Santafesino de veras - Jorge Cafrune
8. Virgen india - Jorge Cafrune & Marito
9. Milonga del solitario - Jorge Cafrune
10. Chacarera del pantano - Jorge Cafrune


Top 10 - Luis Alberto Spinetta
Source
On January 23, he would have turned 63. One of the fathers of Argentine rock, he was an extraordinary singer, guitarist, poet and composer. Still in mourning for his death force on 8 February last year, here's a laborious selection with some of his most memorable songs.

1. Bajan - Pescado Rabioso
2. Plegaria para un niño dormido - Almendra
3. Canción para todos los días de la vida - Luis Alberto Spinetta
4. Por - Pescado Rabioso
5. Descalza camina - Luis Alberto Spinetta
6. Laura va - Almendra
7. Figuración - Almendra
8. Durazno sangrando - Invisible
9. No quiere decir - Luis Alberto Spinetta
10. Cantata de puentes amarillos - Luis Alberto Spinetta


Top 10 - Alfredo Zitarrosa
Source
24 years ago, on January 17, 1989, died one of the most important songwriters of Latin American popular music, exiled by the persecution of the Uruguayan dictatorship, and then also banned by the Argentinean and Chilean dictatorships for the content of complaint in his lyrics. Here ten songs needed to begin to know the tremendous work of Alfredo Zitarrosa.

1. El violín de Becho - Alfredo Zitarrosa
2. Guitarra negra - Alfredo Zitarrosa
3. Adagio en mi país - Alfredo Zitarrosa
4. Barrio Sur - Alfredo Zitarrosa
5. Candombe del olvido - Alfredo Zitarrosa
6. Chamarrita de los milicos - Alfredo Zitarrosa
7. Doña Soledad - Alfredo Zitarrosa
8. Pa'l que se va - Alfredo Zitarrosa
9. Crece desde el pie - Alfredo Zitarrosa
10. Milonga para una niña - Alfredo Zitarrosa

Eduardo Galeano says in "El cantor", about the Uruguayan singer's milongas: "When Alfredo Zitarrosa died in Montevideo, his friend Juceca went with him to the gates of Paradise, so as not to leave him alone in those proceedings. And when he returned, he told us what he had heard. St. Peter asked name, age, occupation. -singer. Alfredo said. he wanted to know: -What do you sing? -Milongas. Alfredo said. St. Peter did not know, so he got curious and ordered: -Sing. And Alfredo sang. One milonga, two, one hundred. San Pedro wanted it to never end. Alfredo's voice, who had shaken the earth, was now shaking the heavens. Then God, who was there pasturing clouds, listened and paid attention. And that was the only time that God did not know who God was.

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Re: Télam (Argentina) - Top songs of each artist

Post by Pierre » Thu Oct 03, 2013 2:55 pm

Blanco wrote:
Top 10 - Luis Alberto Spinetta
Source
On January 23, he would have turned 63. One of the fathers of Argentine rock, he was an extraordinary singer, guitarist, poet and composer. Still in mourning for his death force on 8 February last year, here's a laborious selection with some of his most memorable songs.

1. Bajan - Pescado Rabioso
2. Plegaria para un niño dormido - Almendra
3. Canción para todos los días de la vida - Luis Alberto Spinetta
4. Por - Pescado Rabioso
5. Descalza camina - Luis Alberto Spinetta
6. Laura va - Almendra
7. Figuración - Almendra
8. Durazno sangrando - Invisible
9. No quiere decir - Luis Alberto Spinetta
10. Cantata de puentes amarillos - Luis Alberto Spinetta
I didn't even know he was gone... That's how powerful borders and language barriers are...

I've heard about the guy for several years now and I've yet to really discover his works. Maybe this list will be a nice start.

I'm always sad about these unknown giants who leave unnoticed, except probably in their home country, compared to all the media attention that some receive, for instance Michael Jackson when he passed away (I'm not saying he did not deserve it, I'm just saying that other may deserve it too).

This also reminds me of Gustavo Cerati, who is probably beyond recovery now. How we say in French, the best always leave first...

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Re: Télam (Argentina) - Top songs of each artist

Post by Blanco » Sat Oct 05, 2013 7:50 pm

Pierre wrote:I didn't even know he was gone... That's how powerful borders and language barriers are...

I've heard about the guy for several years now and I've yet to really discover his works. Maybe this list will be a nice start.

I'm always sad about these unknown giants who leave unnoticed, except probably in their home country, compared to all the media attention that some receive, for instance Michael Jackson when he passed away (I'm not saying he did not deserve it, I'm just saying that other may deserve it too).

This also reminds me of Gustavo Cerati, who is probably beyond recovery now. How we say in French, the best always leave first...
I completely agree. Here the news of the death of Luis Alberto Spinetta was broadcasted only in alternative media, unlike the death of Michael Jackson , who made headlines for days. I guess it's because even though we share the same language, Argentina is on the other side of the continent. Besides the issue of popularity beating musical quality. The same thing happened to many other great musicians. And since a picture is worth a thousand words, an example that has impressed me heavily:

Image

We all know this photograph. One of the most famous photographs of all time, and perhaps the most famous when it comes to the world of music. 57 of the greatest jazz musicians together in one place, in one instant. The photo was taken in 1958.

And this is the recreation made ​​in 1996, with those still living jazz musicians of the original photo:

Image

According to wikipedia, until August of this year, only three of them were still alive. Each of those who have gone has been a lamentable loss, not only for jazz, but for all contemporary music. But hardly any of them are mentioned in some media. Ironically, for many good musicians there is only silence.

So unfortunately, yes. The information is filtered by borders and languages. And I believe also popular interests. But here we are. Trying to find music to appreciate beyond the place or the time in which it was made​​. And who knows, maybe this way we help to blur those barriers, and see the music as the most universal of human creations.

So thank you, Pierre. It's good to find people like you and others on the forum with which one can share music. Because in the end, I think that like in any art, passion for music grows by sharing it with others.

About Spinetta, I would recommend listening to any of their albums instead of individual songs. I feel that a selection of songs does not do justice to the author, especially since they are only 10.
My favorite album, because of their unusual structures, surreal lyrics and the balance between simplicity and elaborate work, would be Artaud, by Pescado Rabioso. So in this I agree with the Rolling Stone magazine.

About Cerati, the situation in which he is currently hurts me more than if he had gone. Besides, he was still very young, in my opinion. his most devoted fans say that maybe one day he comes back, so we should not lose hope. Others say that even if he came out of the coma, he would never be the same, so somehow he's already gone, even if his body is still there, alive. In any case, we still have his music. Which is not little legacy.
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Re: Télam (Argentina) - Top songs of each artist

Post by JimmyJazz » Sat Oct 05, 2013 10:04 pm

Pierre wrote:
Blanco wrote:
I didn't even know he was gone... That's how powerful borders and language barriers are...

I've heard about the guy for several years now and I've yet to really discover his works. Maybe this list will be a nice start.

I'm always sad about these unknown giants who leave unnoticed, except probably in their home country, compared to all the media attention that some receive, for instance Michael Jackson when he passed away (I'm not saying he did not deserve it, I'm just saying that other may deserve it too).

This also reminds me of Gustavo Cerati, who is probably beyond recovery now. How we say in French, the best always leave first...
With film it is the exact same way, great filmmakers and movie stars from various countries are revered to this day in their own countries, but are never mentioned in the media here in the US. I've recently been watching a terrific documentary that some here may have heard of, The Story of Film by Northern Ireland film critic Mark Cousins, and you often see in the film statues of great filmmakers and actors in other countries, like Eisenstein in Russia and Satyajit Ray in India. One segment of the documentary discusses a great 1930s Chinese movie actress Ruan Lingyu lie. In her day, she was often referred to as the "Chinese Garbo", and Cousins even interviews a bunch of Chinese women who still fondly remember her movies, even getting tears in their eyes. She even has a statue in honor of her. Yet, she is scarcely known here in the US, as well most of the Western world. Most embarrassingly, even our own filmmakers are often neglected by our own media. Case in point: In 1973, John Ford died. The media here, in his own country, merely passed over his death, giving it little attention. In places like the UK and France, on the other hand, his death was treated by their media as the loss of a major, great artist of the cinema. Same thing happened with Orson Welles, of all people!
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Re: Télam (Argentina) - Top songs of each artist

Post by JimmyJazz » Sat Oct 05, 2013 10:06 pm

Blanco, I was aware of that photograph, but who is all in it?

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Re: Télam (Argentina) - Top songs of each artist

Post by Pierre » Sun Oct 06, 2013 4:30 am

Thank you for your speech Blanco. I do agree with you on everything, and I hope we might be pioneers here of a new approach on music! It is harder for music than for movies, in my opinion, because the language barrier is even more present, but who knows, things might, and I hope they will change!

JimmyJazz is right, though, the same problem affects movies, even in the home countries of the actors and directors (I was unaware that John Ford's death was so neglected, but I knew about the painful way Orson Welles left). Still, I personally think that things have improved more in the movies field than in the music field, the situation is far from perfect, of course, but the research to create a unified worldwide approach of cinema is further developed than that of music. That documentary by Mark Cousins, and specifically the point about Ruan Lingyu, are a good example. How many examples of this kind do we have for music?

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Re: Télam (Argentina) - Top songs of each artist

Post by JimmyJazz » Sun Oct 06, 2013 4:56 am

Regarding John Ford, I'm not entirely certain if the reaction was THAT bad here in the States, but most of what I read indicates that his death was more widely felt in other countries. He had just received a whole bunch of lifetime awards around the time of his death, but I think he was still generally short-shifted in the general media. In other countries, by comparison, the TV stations spent hours talking about him, even airing documentaries. I still remember watching a video on YouTube showing a news station mentioning Welles's death in 1985. The newslady devotes a space of like, I swear, 2 or 3 minutes at most to the great man's life! Only three things are mentioned, predictably: The War of the Worlds broadcast, Citizen Kane, and The Third Man (which, believe it or not, she actually states he directed! Good grief!) No mention of any of his other masterpieces, or his ultimate influence on the movies, and in effect the very way we consume images and information. One of the great artists of the 20th century was shunned in his own homeland. At least he received due praise in other countries, once again.

Still, movies have a more global presence than music appears to, thanks to things like the Cousins doc as well as TSPDT. The TSPDT1000 is ultimately more globally diverse than the AM lists, which can be attributed to the biases of music critics in various countries, and the prominence of English language music throughout the musical marketplace. As you said, Pierre, hopefully that will change in the future.

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Re: Télam (Argentina) - Top songs of each artist

Post by Blanco » Sun Oct 06, 2013 7:30 pm

JimmyJazz wrote:Blanco, I was aware of that photograph, but who is all in it?
The photograph is known as "A great day in Harlem". Here you can see an interactive version with the names of each person who was present: http://www.seewah.com/a-great-day-in-harlem/
And the names are:

Art Blakey
Art Farmer
Bill Crump
Buck Clayton
Bud Freeman
Buster Bailey
Charles Mingus
Chubby Jackson
Coleman Hawkins
Count Basie
Dickie Wells
Dizzy Gillespie
Eddie Locke
Emmett Berry
Ernie Wilkins
Gene Krupa
George Wettling
Gerry Mulligan
Gigi Gryce
Hank Jones
Hilton Jefferson
J.C. Heard
Jay C. Higginbotham
Jimmy Jones
Jimmy Rushing
Jo Jones
Joe Thomas
Johnny Griffin
Lawrence Brown
Lester Young
Luckey Roberts
Marian McPartland
Mary Lou Williams
Max Kaminsky
Maxine Sullivan
Miff Mole
Milt Hinton
Oscar Pettiford
Osie Johnson
Pee Wee Russell
Red Allen
Rex Stewart
Roy Eldridge
Rudy Powell
Sahib Shihab
Scoville Browne
Sonny Greer
Stuff Smith
Taft Jordan
Thelonious Monk
Tyree Glenn
Vic Dickenson
Wilbur Ware
Zutty Singleton

And those who still have much more jazz to play:
Horace Silver
Sonny Rollins
Benny Golson

:music-listening:

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JimmyJazz
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Re: Télam (Argentina) - Top songs of each artist

Post by JimmyJazz » Sun Oct 06, 2013 8:00 pm

Thanks for posting the interactive version of the photo, Blanco. It is great, yet at the same time surreal, to see images of so many great artists gathered together at the same time, as in this photo. Even more surreal, and somewhat elegiac, to see that same photo in 1996 let alone the 21st century today. Also, I would like to apologize to both you and Pierre for sidetracking this interesting discussion about global music artists with my little tangent about John and Orson and cinema. I simply brought it up because of the similarities between what has been mentioned about various semi-remembered, semi-forgotten jazz legends and foreign musicians who are revered in their own countries but who are shunned in other nations and some film examples that it made me think about.

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Blanco
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Re: Télam (Argentina) - Top songs of each artist

Post by Blanco » Sun Oct 06, 2013 10:03 pm

On the contrary, James. Thank you for enriching the discussion. Now that you mention it , I strayed a bit from the topic. The jazz players I mentioned do not fall under the category of unrecognized artists from foreign countries. Well, yes and no. And maybe that's why I digressed.

Also, your opinion seems ideal for this topic. It is one more example of art despised by their place of origin. And this does not mean necessarily being despised voluntarily. I remember when I saw the movie "OldBoy", the performance of Min-sik Choi seemed more worthy of an Oscar that many winning performances. Or at least from my point of view. Well I'm sure you know more about that than me. And because of that, the more your knowledge about movies or some other subject can enrich the discussion, the better.

Although yes, I also agree that in music, the problem is bigger. I do not know if it is due to certain nationalism, or perhaps because of the habit, but sometimes people (myself included) tend to not value much foreign music, unless it is music made in any of the countries we are used.

Well, I think discussions like this could at some point create a solution to this problem. It is a fact that we all have different tastes, but I think we can appeal for the opportunity to listen to what we do not know, only by the hope that we might like this (maybe great) music. Something like finding the positive side of global communication.

Although we are in the lists section, and since the lists are at the beginning of the subject, and in that place will continue, and also because the discussion turned from this list, I hope there is no problem if we keep talking here. Unless Harold disagrees, of course.

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Pierre
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Re: Télam (Argentina) - Top songs of each artist

Post by Pierre » Mon Oct 07, 2013 4:34 am

There's no problem, JimmyJazz, I think that the comparison with cinema is actually relevant to the topic. And whatever, we have derailed from the original subject at the very moment I talked about my ignorance of Spinetta's death. Isn't this topic about the Télam lists in the first place? :whistle:

To answer to Blanco, I think nationalism plays a part, but not that significant. I admit I lack knowledge in Mexican music (I seem to remember you are Mexican, but I'm not sure), I have not listened to much Café Tacvba, for instance... But I believe the main responsible is the language barrier. Movies can be dubbed or subtitled. For music, circumventing the tower of Babel is much harder.

JimmyJazz has raised another point, though, always interesting even if it's a classic problem: the lack of interest for some great artists (according to some critics and their cult community, of course) in their own home country. In the US, Gene Clark is often labelled as a lost classic, so are the Zombies, although they have since both benefitted to some extent from the devotion of the critics. Here in France, there are acts such as Ronnie Bird, Alain Kan or The Dogs, which are huge artists in my opinion, but who failed to attract public interest in their days. The "lost classics" are an endless field of research I guess (knowing that Orson Welles was one for cinema at a time seems baffling nowadays!) but Searching for Sugar Man or the current status of the Zombies are proof that there are solutions for it. I believe that the problem of making people discover the classics of one's own country is more complicated. I'll just quote Dave Thompson of Allmusic, in his review of the French classic Téléphone album "Dure Limite": "[It's] a universal storm that falters in just one department -- the band's (admittedly admirable) insistence on recording their lyrics in French. It's hard to sing along if you don't know what the words mean!" That sums it all up, I guess...

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