AMF Favorite Albums of All-Time -- RESULTS

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Re: AMF Favorite Albums of All-Time -- RESULTS

Post by panam » Fri Sep 22, 2017 11:27 pm

Chico Buarque and Buena Vista! Yeah! :)

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Re: AMF Favorite Albums of All-Time -- RESULTS

Post by Listyguy » Sat Sep 23, 2017 12:25 am

Jirin wrote:I wonder why Neil Young's dark albums are falling so far,
I was wondering the same thing! I'm hoping a loss of 150 for On the Beach and Tonight's the Night doesn't mean his other albums will also fall considerably.

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Re: AMF Favorite Albums of All-Time -- RESULTS

Post by Henry » Sat Sep 23, 2017 12:47 am

Listyguy wrote:
Jirin wrote:I wonder why Neil Young's dark albums are falling so far,
I was wondering the same thing! I'm hoping a loss of 150 for On the Beach and Tonight's the Night doesn't mean his other albums will also fall considerably.
My surmise is that lot of acts from the 70's have been dropping because critics lists focus on newer music and folks born after 1990 often listen more extensively to earlier bands who are deemed "influential."

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Re: AMF Favorite Albums of All-Time -- RESULTS

Post by VanillaFire1000 » Sat Sep 23, 2017 4:14 am

Or our sample size is highly variable depending on the year. All it takes it 3-4 people to really change the polls, at least until the top 100 or so.

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Re: AMF Favorite Albums of All-Time -- RESULTS

Post by veganvalentine » Sat Sep 23, 2017 4:45 am

The disparity between the critical and mass perception of Pink Floyd's Animals is interesting. It's #26 on RYM and has consistently fared well on AMF polls, but sits at #1659 in the last official update. It may be that the length of the songs (most of the album is comprised of three songs over ten minutes in length each) is simply unpalatable to most mainstream critics, but Animals' predecessor Wish You Were Here also contains long songs and is highly lauded. It may also be that people who favor "serious" art rock are overrepresented in internet polls, and thus bands like Pink Floyd and Radiohead often do well.

I think most Pink Floyd fans would agree that WYWH is better than Animals, but not monumentally so.

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Re: AMF Favorite Albums of All-Time -- RESULTS

Post by Depeche Mode » Sat Sep 23, 2017 7:14 am

veganvalentine wrote:The disparity between the critical and mass perception of Pink Floyd's Animals is interesting. It's #26 on RYM and has consistently fared well on AMF polls, but sits at #1659 in the last official update. It may be that the length of the songs (most of the album is comprised of three songs over ten minutes in length each) is simply unpalatable to most mainstream critics, but Animals' predecessor Wish You Were Here also contains long songs and is highly lauded. It may also be that people who favor "serious" art rock are overrepresented in internet polls, and thus bands like Pink Floyd and Radiohead often do well.

I think most Pink Floyd fans would agree that WYWH is better than Animals, but not monumentally so.
I find that interesting as well, though it's more the RYM placements that puzzle me. I never felt the urge to listen to Animals besides Dogs, which, to be fair, is one of the greatest songs I know. Same with WYWH/title track and Shine part 1.

Then again, many Dylan/Beatles albums which fare better on AM than RYM are not that great to me either...so what do I know. :)

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Re: AMF Favorite Albums of All-Time -- RESULTS

Post by spiderpig » Sat Sep 23, 2017 8:16 am

veganvalentine wrote:The disparity between the critical and mass perception of Pink Floyd's Animals is interesting. It's #26 on RYM and has consistently fared well on AMF polls, but sits at #1659 in the last official update. It may be that the length of the songs (most of the album is comprised of three songs over ten minutes in length each) is simply unpalatable to most mainstream critics, but Animals' predecessor Wish You Were Here also contains long songs and is highly lauded. It may also be that people who favor "serious" art rock are overrepresented in internet polls, and thus bands like Pink Floyd and Radiohead often do well.
There's a large group of prog rock and metal fans on RYM, so anything belonging to those genres will generally do pretty well there. I think critics can handle long songs. The top AM song is 6:13, an unusually long single. "Sister Ray" is the most acclaimed song in "White Light/White Heat", despite being almost 20 minutes long. And they don't have a problem with art rock: "A Day In The Life" is currently the #3 AM song, despite not even being a single! (by the way, it's also the longest song on that album)

I think the problem critics have with prog rock is that it unsuccessfully tries to bring to rock some characteristics of classical music. Classical mostly lacks the "flame" of popular music, its energy and hypnotical qualities, its "raw humanity". But good classical music is both sophisticated and a mirror or perhaps a painting that shows us that "raw humanity" through new colors. Now prog rock often lacks the sophistication of good classical music. And its attempts at being technical and virtuosic are often sterile and prevent it from either capturing that "raw humanity" or reflecting it through a new lens.

But, of course, this may not be the reason why "WYWH" usually does better than "Animals" (both with critics and fans, it should be noted). Sometimes it just has to do with the fact that unless you're one of the two or three top acts, your fourth or fifth best album will tend to be overshadowed by your other albums because people haven't listened to it yet (since new listeners will try to listen to your best ones first) or because when making their lists, critics (being less "fanboyish" about it) will try to include many different acts, which pushes your fourth best album down.

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Re: AMF Favorite Albums of All-Time -- RESULTS

Post by Depeche Mode » Sat Sep 23, 2017 12:38 pm

Great post.

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Re: AMF Favorite Albums of All-Time -- RESULTS

Post by Reverend Moonjava » Sat Sep 23, 2017 12:53 pm

My theory is that Animals' fate as the "other one" of the four classic Pink Floyd albums was permanently sealed by its composition. Wish You Were Here and Animals have a similar structure where the core of the album is three songs bookended by a fourth one split in two. But what makes Animals different is that Wish You Were Here has the bulk of its length (though just barely) in the bookends, "Shine On You Crazy Diamond". Animals' length is almost entirely made up of the three core songs, with "Pigs on the Wing" being basically a non-factor, a brief intro and outro of less than two minutes each time. So even though Wish You Were Here is actually a bit longer, its length is a lot more balanced in how its spread out, with a long beginning and ending and three more songs that are all plenty meaty but still come and go in well under ten minutes each. Animals also has a much less loose concept than the vague themes of The Dark Side of the Moon and Wish You Were Here or the storyline in The Wall, and as a result it's the most homogenous of the four, in sound and in subject matter.

Or you could be simpler about it, and say that none of Wish You Were Here's songs are more than twice the length of "Stairway to Heaven" and contain about four minutes consisting mostly of barking and whistling, so of course it's more popular, but that would be reductive and a little more harsh on Animals than I think it deserves.
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Re: AMF Favorite Albums of All-Time -- RESULTS

Post by Listyguy » Sat Sep 23, 2017 1:04 pm

Wish You Were Here is in my top 10 favorite albums of all time, whereas Animals didn't make my list (which was 250 albums).

What separates the two for me is that WYWH, while it has two really long songs (which I love), it also has three normalish length songs in the middle. And if I were going to rank the tracks from these two albums, the top for would be from WYWH. I'm not sure it's the length that makes me like them, but I'm not sure it doesn't.

That's my personal opinion on these two albums. I consider WYWH a classic, while Animals I consider just a good album.

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Re: AMF Favorite Albums of All-Time -- RESULTS

Post by Kingoftonga » Sat Sep 23, 2017 5:19 pm

VanillaFire1000 wrote:Or our sample size is highly variable depending on the year. All it takes it 3-4 people to really change the polls, at least until the top 100 or so.
I've been thinking about this...I didn't get a chance to submit a ballot this year, due to a new job, an out-of-state move, and a host of other factors, and I've noticed that a lot of the albums that I would have ranked in my top 250 or so last time have fallen this time around. Now I'm feeling like I'm personally responsible for the fall of some of my favorites. :oops: There's probably a lot of other factors involved, though.

It looks like this is the 6th AM Favorite Albums poll, so it might be fun to start charting some long-term trends.

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Re: AMF Favorite Albums of All-Time -- RESULTS

Post by VanillaFire1000 » Sat Sep 23, 2017 10:31 pm

People have noticed trends before. The older the albums are, the more likely they are to be highly acclaimed by AM, while newer (90s and up) are not as correlated. Nature of the site, really. We all came here to find what the "best" albums are, but the ones closer to our own personal lives.

RE: Animals, don't forget narrative when thinking about albums. Piper, DSotM, The Wall and WYWH all have alot more cultural cache with how they were recorded and marketed compared to Animals.

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Re: AMF Favorite Albums of All-Time -- RESULTS

Post by veganvalentine » Sun Sep 24, 2017 8:35 am

spiderpig wrote:
veganvalentine wrote:The disparity between the critical and mass perception of Pink Floyd's Animals is interesting. It's #26 on RYM and has consistently fared well on AMF polls, but sits at #1659 in the last official update. It may be that the length of the songs (most of the album is comprised of three songs over ten minutes in length each) is simply unpalatable to most mainstream critics, but Animals' predecessor Wish You Were Here also contains long songs and is highly lauded. It may also be that people who favor "serious" art rock are overrepresented in internet polls, and thus bands like Pink Floyd and Radiohead often do well.
There's a large group of prog rock and metal fans on RYM, so anything belonging to those genres will generally do pretty well there. I think critics can handle long songs. The top AM song is 6:13, an unusually long single. "Sister Ray" is the most acclaimed song in "White Light/White Heat", despite being almost 20 minutes long. And they don't have a problem with art rock: "A Day In The Life" is currently the #3 AM song, despite not even being a single! (by the way, it's also the longest song on that album)

I think the problem critics have with prog rock is that it unsuccessfully tries to bring to rock some characteristics of classical music. Classical mostly lacks the "flame" of popular music, its energy and hypnotical qualities, its "raw humanity". But good classical music is both sophisticated and a mirror or perhaps a painting that shows us that "raw humanity" through new colors. Now prog rock often lacks the sophistication of good classical music. And its attempts at being technical and virtuosic are often sterile and prevent it from either capturing that "raw humanity" or reflecting it through a new lens.

But, of course, this may not be the reason why "WYWH" usually does better than "Animals" (both with critics and fans, it should be noted). Sometimes it just has to do with the fact that unless you're one of the two or three top acts, your fourth or fifth best album will tend to be overshadowed by your other albums because people haven't listened to it yet (since new listeners will try to listen to your best ones first) or because when making their lists, critics (being less "fanboyish" about it) will try to include many different acts, which pushes your fourth best album down.
Interesting points. I wasn't saying that critics have a problem with art rock, just poking fun at people like me who like bands that perhaps take themselves a little too seriously. While I appreciate Like a Rolling Stone's influence on long form music, I don't think it really shows critics' appreciation of long instrumental music (although jazz is an exception, as critics seem to have accepted that it's the nature of the genre), as it just repeats the verse and chorus a bunch of times, and honestly the song isn't that long from a modern perspective. To me, it's disappointing that a song as beautiful as Rhapsody in Blue can miss the AM top 1000, but I understand a lot of "best songs" lists won't consider long pieces, especially quasi-classical ones from the 1920s. It's just a shame because 1920s films are very much a part of the cinematic canon.

In any case, I'm glad the public and the critics appreciate WYWH, even if I find it surprising. And speaking of long instrumental music (and hopefully getting this thread back on topic), it's great to see Getz/Gilberto with another strong showing! Listening to that album makes me feel like I'm at a swanky 60s cocktail party.

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Re: AMF Favorite Albums of All-Time -- RESULTS

Post by Harold » Sun Sep 24, 2017 9:40 pm

I'm assuming that Real Life Reasons have kept notbrianeno from posting any further results this entire weekend, but at the risk of being That Guy, I had kind of been hoping that the rollout would be just a little faster...

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Re: AMF Favorite Albums of All-Time -- RESULTS

Post by notbrianeno » Mon Sep 25, 2017 12:29 am

Harold wrote:I'm assuming that Real Life Reasons have kept notbrianeno from posting any further results this entire weekend, but at the risk of being That Guy, I had kind of been hoping that the rollout would be just a little faster...


Rollout resumes now
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Re: AMF Favorite Albums of All-Time -- RESULTS

Post by notbrianeno » Mon Sep 25, 2017 1:11 am

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#340. Creedence Clearwater Revival | Green River (1969)
# of Voters: 17 | Score: 619.331
Rank in 2014: #328
AM 3000 Rank: #348
Top Fans: SJner (#72), RockyRaccoon (#73), Andyd1010 (#96)
If anything, CCR's third album Green River represents the full flower of their classic sound initially essayed on its predecessor, Bayou Country. One of the differences between the two albums is that Green River is tighter, with none of the five-minute-plus jams that filled out both their debut and Bayou Country, but the true key to its success is a peak in John Fogerty's creativity. Although CCR had at least one cover on each album, they relied on Fogerty to crank out new material every month. He was writing so frequently that the craft became second-nature and he laid his emotions and fears bare, perhaps unintentionally. Perhaps that's why Green River has fear, anger, dread, and weariness creeping on the edges of gleeful music. This was a band that played rock & roll so joyously that they masked the, well, "sinister" undercurrents in Fogerty's songs
--Stephen Thomas Erlewine, Allmusic

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#339. The Beatles | Please Please Me (1963)
# of Voters: 15 | Score: 620.114
Rank in 2014: #403
AM 3000 Rank: #421
Top Fans: VictorMarianoo77 (#8), Dudumb (#63), Andyd1010 (#80), GabeBasso (#95)
Consider the chord progressions, at once rockingly flashy and countryfied, like they've been unearthed from decades ago but really sounded unlike anything else at the time — and played with a phrasing akin to the grottiest garages and the dirtiest r&b. I mean Jesus, listen to the sharp, jittered-up licks in "I Saw Her Standing There". Listen to the bass fills in the title track, like gleeful little whispers. Listen to the way George splurts out the first two or three notes of each of his phrases in "Anna" and then does a little boomerang back to the root and slow down, like being given a light push (in accordance with the words). Compare it to the relatively straight-ahead chords of most other pop of the time and realize how actually, yeah, in fact, these guys really were That Important.
--LimedIsBagles, RYM

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#338. Wilco | Summerteeth (1999)
# of Voters: 14 | Score: 620.204
Rank in 2014: #339
AM 3000 Rank: #544
Top Fans: Zombeels (#18), Nick (#18), Schaefer.tk (#22), JohnnyBGoode (#81)
Normally this sort of thing leads to a hit or miss affair, but Wilco doesn't drop the ball once. The sound of Summerteeth at it's core is the product of a guitar based alt-rock band, but the production choices and arrangements are what really turn it into something special. The electric tinged strings on "She's a Jar," the garbled static like sounds that bring "A Shot in the Arm" to such an awesome climax, the muffled AM band effect that gives the outro to "Via Chicago" a perfectly distant and forlorn far from home feeling all work together as a perfect example of how the dawn of Pro Tools revolutionized the concept of "using the studio as an instrument." Arrangement-wise, the way that the dark subject matter of the title track is juxtaposed with cheery female "oohs" and "aahs," an upbeat melody, and literal birds chirping add to the album's depth and replay value. Even the more stripped back arrangements don't go completely unadorned, see the guitar driven electronics on "How to Fight Lonliness" that add a hauntingly gorgeous element to a mellow down-tempo folk-out.
--ALink2ThePast, RYM

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#337. Bob Marley & the Wailers | Natty Dread (1974)
# of Voters: 12 | Score: 621.786
Rank in 2014: #292
AM 3000 Rank: #176
Top Fans: RockyRaccoon (#16), Schaefer.tk (#43), PlasticRam (#52), Karla (#64), OrdinaryPerson (#95)
I think reggae's special in that it puts so much spirit into a fairly minimal frame. All Marley needs here on this album is three backup singers and a parade of instruments selected for them being just-so, and certainly not all at once; where at the same time rock was using entire orchestras and choirs to get emotional responses from its audiences (still does!). The latter approach has a place too, of course, I just really enjoy that about reggae. The effect's personal, and I think leaves more of a spiritual impression, as opposed to being swept up in a wave of sturm und drang. And yes, different intentions to begin with, I don't even know why I'm comparing.
--Brevity, RYM

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#336. Prince & the Revolution | Parade (1986)
# of Voters: 13 | Score: 622.316
Rank in 2014: #288
AM 3000 Rank: #642
Top Fans: Babydoll (#4), Slucs (#9), Romain (#27), Moonbeam (#28)
While Around the World in a Day came as a shock to listeners at the time with its whimsical psychedelia, Parade actually ups the ante and delivers Prince's most colorful album to date. By this point, the Revolution had become a well-oiled machine firing on all cylinders, incorporating a wide assortment of influences and styles to put forth this stunning document of their prowess. Parade is also the album that sees the band distribute the roles most, as Wendy and Lisa are heard singing throughout, even carrying the vocal lead on "I Wonder U". Sadly, it would prove to be the last album released before the ugly breakup of the band.
--Moonbeam, RYM

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#335. Van Halen | Van Halen (1978)
# of Voters: 12 | Score: 622.335
Rank in 2014: #472
AM 3000 Rank: #240
Top Fans: Slick (#27), Dexter (#42), Listyguy (#54), Nico (#62), Profeta (#69), Bruno (#79)
Among revolutionary rock albums, Van Halen's debut often gets short shrift. Although it altered perceptions of what the guitar could do, it is not spoken of in the same reverential tones as Are You Experienced? and although it set the template for how rock & roll sounded for the next decade or more, it isn't seen as an epochal generational shift, like Led Zeppelin, The Ramones, The Rolling Stones, or Never Mind the Bollocks Here's the Sex Pistols, which was released just the year before. But make no mistake, Van Halen is as monumental, as seismic as those records, but part of the reason it's never given the same due is that there's no pretension, nothing self-conscious about it. In the best sense, it is an artless record, in the sense that it doesn't seem contrived, but it's also a great work of art because it's an effortless, guileless expression of what the band is all about, and what it would continue to be over the years. The band did get better, tighter, over the years -- peaking with their sleek masterpiece 1984, where there was no fat, nothing untidy -- but everything was in place here, from the robotic pulse of Michael Anthony and Alex Van Halen, to the gonzo shtick of David Lee Roth to the astonishing guitar of Eddie Van Halen.
--Stephen Thomas Erlewine, Allmusic

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#334. Tame Impala | Currents (2015)
# of Voters: 15 | Score: 623.525
Rank in 2014: N/A
AM 3000 Rank: #410
Top Fans: PlasticRam (#32), JohnnyBGoode (#47), Whuntva (#91), GuccilittlePiggy (#94)
It's a despairing, open-ended psych-disco hybrid whose closest modern analog is Daft Punk's *Random Access Memories—a record that cast disco, yacht rock, and dance pop as shared founts of old-school, hands-on music-making. In this sense, the album reimagines and expands Tame Impala's relationship to album rock—*like Loveless or Kid A or Yankee Hotel Foxtrot, it's the result of a supernaturally talented obsessive trying to perfect music while redefining their relationship to album-oriented rock. There's more care and nuance put into the drum filtering on "Let It Happen" than most bands manage in an entire career of recording.
--Ian Cohen, Pitchfork

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#333. Run the Jewels | RTJ2 (2014)
# of Voters: 16 | Score: 623.528
Rank in 2014: N/A
AM 3000 Rank: #302
Top Fans: GuccilittlePiggy (#21), SweepstakesRon (#39), Nassim (#49), ProsecutorGodot (#74)
Otherwise, when El-P sneers, "You want a whore in a white dress/ I want a wife with a thong" during "Angel Duster", it’s a metaphor that implicates just about everybody in his blast radius—conservative and liberal politicians who hide their bullshit ideals behind "values," religious figures doing the same, beta-male types using performative tolerance as a front for their passive-aggressive misogyny, or just anyone who’s full of shit. For Run the Jewels, these people are what cocaine was to Clipse, sex to Lil Wayne, clothing to Cam’ron—their domain, their muse, a seemingly endless source of inspiration for the most viciously realized rap album of 2014 and most other years.
--Ian Cohen, Pitchfork

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#332. Boards of Canada | Music Has the Right to Children (1998)
# of Voters: 14 | Score: 627.383
Rank in 2014: #318
AM 3000 Rank: #416
Top Fans: Gillingham (#2), OrdinaryPerson (#8), EmilienDelRey (#25), BleuPanda (#82), Jackson (#95)
Boards of Canada designed Music Has the Right to Children to trigger a nostalgic response in the listener, the music literally constructed to subliminally, hypnotically suggest the listener's earliest, possibly precognitive, memories (at least to anyone who grew up in the seventies or eighties, the decades from which their sound is derived). On a purely analytical basis, the songs consist of hazy waves of analogue synthesizers and scratchy breakbeats, which serve as a basis for a lot of ambient noise and heavily manipulated voice recordings that give them an unsettlingly disconnected effect. The wide gap between the atmospheric underlying ambient/analog sounds and the smoky, downtempo beats makes for a disassociative effect where it should not fit together as dreamily perfect as it does. Their sculpture of sound brings to mind the layering techniques of Kevin Shields on Loveless and this is a work every bit as influential.
--jshopa, RYM

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#331. Public Enemy | Fear of a Black Planet (1990)
# of Voters: 17 | Score: 627.681
Rank in 2014: #187
AM 3000 Rank: #130
Top Fans: Bootsy (#38), Jirin (#65), RockyRaccoon (#71)
It’s a testament to Public Enemy’s vision as songwriters that out of the controversy of uncertainty of 1989 they were able to forge a masterpiece of both social commentary and musical innovation. Echoes of their anger and ambition can still be heard, 25 years on, in the verses and activism of Kendrick Lamar, Run The Jewels and Young Fathers. ‘Fear Of A Black Planet’ continues to challenge and provoke listeners, precisely because it doesn’t offer easy solutions to society’s ills. Reviewing the album for Melody Maker in 1990, Simon Reynolds summed it up: “Public Enemy are important, not because of the thoroughly dubious ‘answers’ they propound in interview, but because of the angry questions that seethe in their music, in the very fabric of their sound; the bewilderment and rage that, in this case, have made for one hell of strong, scary album.”
--Kevin Perry, NME
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Re: AMF Favorite Albums of All-Time -- RESULTS

Post by Jirin » Mon Sep 25, 2017 1:41 am

Also surprised how low Fear of a Black Planet is.

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Re: AMF Favorite Albums of All-Time -- RESULTS

Post by Listyguy » Mon Sep 25, 2017 2:27 am

I love that Van Halen quote. I can see why people don't like Van Halen as a whole. but their debut album is a different beast in my opinion. It's fun, high energy, guitar fueled and, indeed, revolutionary. I think the influence the band had on hair metal and other not-so-liked genres around here might be part of the reason for some of the disdain around the band. I'd love to hear other opinions on this.

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Re: AMF Favorite Albums of All-Time -- RESULTS

Post by notbrianeno » Mon Sep 25, 2017 2:28 am

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#330. Justin Timberlake | Futuresex/LoveSounds (2006)
# of Voters: 13 | Score: 628.681
Rank in 2014: #761
AM 3000 Rank: #638
Top Fans: Renan (#9), Karla (#15), Felipinho (#17), Victor.Marianoo77 (#41)
Almost entirely produced by Timbaland-- and with a more pronounced hip-hop edge than its predecessor-- the album abandons the feelgood sheen which the Neptunes peddled so adroitly on Justified, but makes up for it with the largesse of its sonic embrace, with Timbaland resurrecting many of his most effective guises, from rubbery synthetic funk to pseudo-crunk blare to eerie Eastern opulence. Throughout, the grooves are defined by their melodic intensity: It's the searing synth riffs and skyscraping strings which grab your attention, not stuttering beats or startling sound effects-- although these, too, are present in abundance.
--Tim Finney, Pitchfork

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#329. Funkadelic/Parliament | One Nation Under A Groove (1978)
# of Voters: 16 | Score: 629.639
Rank in 2014: #422
AM 3000 Rank: #253
Top Fans: Bootsy (#57), VanillaFire1000 (#99)
The greatest funk album ever made, and it's no coincidence it's also the most crazed. Listening to it is like watching Star Wars, Shaft, The Godfather and The Benny Hill Show simultaneously. Worth getting just for Eddie Hazel's guitar solos
--BradL, RYM

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#328. James Brown | Live at the Apollo (1963)
# of Voters: 17 | Score: 634.517
Rank in 2014: #261
AM 3000 Rank: #49
Top Fans: Bruno (#32), Nico (#34), Spiderpig (#71), Panam (#91)
The Godfather of Soul. The Hardest Working Man in Show Business. All these titles James Brown has been bestowed with are accurate, and you can hear them through the music here. You think he’s just standing around during those instrumental bridges? Hell no. This album may not be the bottom line on soul music, but it’s the bottom line on putting on a good show.
--Listyguy, RYM

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#327. N.W.A. | Straight Outta Compton (1988)
# of Voters: 15 | Score: 637.883
Rank in 2014: #423
AM 3000 Rank: #117
Top Fans: Luis15Fernando (#14), BryanBehar (#41), Bruno (#44), Nico (#49), VanillaFire1000 (#79)
Anyone who wants to understand the mentality of hip-hop, the reason it still strikes such a chord with the youth of today, and wants to hear a slice of what it's like to live in the American gutter, needs to know - Straight Outta Compton is essential listening. It was a massive event back in the day, and the shadow of it is still being cast. Maybe the power had dimmed somewhat, maybe it's more 'important' than 'great', and maybe judged away from everything around it it leaves a little to be desired, but this is still a classic.
--Iai, RYM

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#326. Jay-Z | The Blueprint (2001)
# of Voters: 14 | Score: 638.408
Rank in 2014: #183
AM 3000 Rank: #139
Top Fans: Whuntva (#37), Luis15Fernando (#51), Nick (#61), Bruno (#84), Jirin (#92)
The real surprise on Blueprint is Jay’s experimentation with tracks. Timbaland’s “Hola’ Hovito,” “U Don’t Know,” and “Takeover” are rap rock-pure hard-core head-banging in the tradition of KRS-One’s “I’m Still #1”. Ever icy, Jay never raises his voice, proving you don’t have to yell to rage. Divided between this new kind of metal and the soulful sounds of “ Heart of the City,” Blueprint is made cohesive by the consistency of its pilot, no matter the change in speed.
--Dream Hampton, Vibe

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#325. Metallica | Metallica (The Black Album) (1991)
# of Voters: 14 | Score: 642.426
Rank in 2014: #351
AM 3000 Rank: #212
Top Fans: Dexter (#2), Victor.marianoo77 (#24), Schaefer.tk (#31)
After years of wild thrash metal, Metallica simplified everything and became the biggest band in the world. The Black Album’s dark, muscular sound would permanently alter the course of heavy music.
--Zoe Camp, Pitchfork

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#324. Can | Tago Mago (1971)
# of Voters: 16 | Score: 646.279
Rank in 2014: #197
AM 3000 Rank: #221
Top Fans: BangJan (#27), Schaefer.tk (#42), Panam (#75), SonofSamIAm (#99)
In his seminal work on Kosmische, Krautrocksampler, Julian Cope writes that Can's Tago Mago "sounds only like itself, like no-one before or after". 40 years on from the album's initial release, it's an observation that still holds true. There have been many bands who have attempted to recreate the heady, woozy, dark whirl of rhythms invoked on Tago Mago – from Public Image Limited to The Horrors – yet none of them have ever managed to truly capture the combination of the sinister and the sublime that have made it such a modern classic.
--Cay McDermott, TheQuietus

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#323. Muse | Black Holes & Revelations (2006)
# of Voters: 12 | Score: 646.717
Rank in 2014: #641
AM 3000 Rank: #1665
Top Fans: Andyd1010 (#26), Felipinho (#28), Slick (#31), Romain (#78), LuvulongTIM (#100)
Muse have made a ridiculous, overblown, ambitious and utterly brilliant album, with more thrills than their previous three put together, which, in an alternative universe, would leave them at the end of an epic lineage connecting the greatest bands of all time: Queen, Roxy Music, Ziggy (not his mere human form of Bowie), ABC, Frankie Goes To Hollywood, Adam And The Ants and Queens Of The Stone Age. In this universe of Dadrock authenticity, they’ve made a record with enough power and ambition that it might just rewrite that particular rulebook. Whichever way, ‘Black Holes & Revelations’ will slay you.
--Anthony Thornton, NME

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#322. BeeGees | Saturday Night Fever OST (1977)
# of Voters: 13 | Score: 650.881
Rank in 2014: #303
AM 3000 Rank: #171
Top Fans: Profeta (#1), Georgie (#12), Renan (#14), ProsecutorGodot (#42), Bruno (#95)
The intro to "Stayin Alive" kicks in, you start walking around your room all groovy-like pretending you have a coke problem. Then "Night Fever" blasts its way through and you can't help but imitate John Travolta's sweet dance moves (and sweet attire). You sing every line to "More Than A Woman", with sincere facial expressions and all, lay on your bed and stare at the ceiling to "How Deep Is Your Love", then get back out on the bedroom dance floor during "You Should Be Dancing" and "Jive Talkin", this time with a white towel over your shoulders pretending its a cape.
And those are just the Bee Gees songs.
--DoctorSax, RYM

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#321. Jefferson Airplane | Surrealistic Pillow (1967)
# of Voters: 18 | Score: 651.846
Rank in 2014: #326
AM 3000 Rank: #174
Top Fans: M24 (#79), DaveC (#95)
Surrealistic Pillow rode the pop charts for most of 1967, soaring into that rarefied Top Five region occupied by the likes of the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, and so on, to which few American rock acts apart from the Byrds had been able to lay claim since 1964. And decades later the album still comes off as strong as any of those artists' best work. From the Top Ten singles "White Rabbit" and "Somebody to Love" to the sublime "Embryonic Journey," the sensibilities are fierce, the material manages to be both melodic and complex (and it rocks, too), and the performances, sparked by new member Grace Slick on most of the lead vocals, are inspired, helped along by Jerry Garcia (serving as spiritual and musical advisor and sometimes guitarist).
--Bruce Eder, Allmusic
Last edited by notbrianeno on Mon Sep 25, 2017 8:38 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: AMF Favorite Albums of All-Time -- RESULTS

Post by Nick » Mon Sep 25, 2017 3:06 am

While I really like Live at the Apollo 1963, I didn't put it at #34 on my list, I placed it at around #250 or so.

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Re: AMF Favorite Albums of All-Time -- RESULTS

Post by Sweepstakes Ron » Mon Sep 25, 2017 3:13 am

Nick wrote:While I really like Live at the Apollo 1963, I didn't put it at #34 on my list, I placed it at around #250 or so.
Correct, Nico was actually the one who placed it at #34. It’s a one letter difference, it’s to be expected.
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Re: AMF Favorite Albums of All-Time -- RESULTS

Post by StevieFan13 » Mon Sep 25, 2017 3:16 am

And thus, our first album from the top 100 drops out! Sorry, James Brown. Also, surprised and delighted by the second(!) JT album making the list!
Music is a world within itself, with a language we all understand - Sir Duke (1976)

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Re: AMF Favorite Albums of All-Time -- RESULTS

Post by andyd1010 » Mon Sep 25, 2017 3:21 am

StevieFan13 wrote:And thus, our first album from the top 100 drops out! Sorry, James Brown. Also, surprised and delighted by the second(!) JT album making the list!
Screamadelica already took that honor... Nice showing for Muse there.

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Re: AMF Favorite Albums of All-Time -- RESULTS

Post by bootsy » Mon Sep 25, 2017 3:39 am

Jirin wrote:Also surprised how low Fear of a Black Planet is.
A little but it doesn't bother me. As I said before I look at this as a fan's poll so others on here probably don't see it the way we expect it to go and I'm fine with that.

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Re: AMF Favorite Albums of All-Time -- RESULTS

Post by StevieFan13 » Mon Sep 25, 2017 3:53 am

andyd1010 wrote:
StevieFan13 wrote:And thus, our first album from the top 100 drops out! Sorry, James Brown. Also, surprised and delighted by the second(!) JT album making the list!
Screamadelica already took that honor... Nice showing for Muse there.
Oh right. I feel bad for both albums, I really like them. Oh well, a place in the top 500 is still nothing to sneeze at.
Music is a world within itself, with a language we all understand - Sir Duke (1976)

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Re: AMF Favorite Albums of All-Time -- RESULTS

Post by veganvalentine » Mon Sep 25, 2017 6:37 am

Live at the Apollo has an incredible vibe (it sounds like the band and the audience had an absolute hell of a time), but for an AM top 100 album, the songs aren't very strong, especially compared to Brown's later output.

As for Van Halen, I've never listened to the entire album, but it's pretty incredible how many hits are packed into it. They're probably penalized on this list (and on many lists) because of the machismo and puerile lyrics.

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Re: AMF Favorite Albums of All-Time -- RESULTS

Post by notbrianeno » Mon Sep 25, 2017 8:37 am

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#320. Slint | Spiderland (1991)
# of Voters: 14 | Score: 652.202
Rank in 2014: #168
AM 3000 Rank: #296
Top Fans: Chambord (#7), Jeff (#29), Jackson (#68), Dudumb (#84), Jirin (#86)
Spiderland is more than an album. It's a place. An empty quarry deep in the middle of your own fucked-up subconscious. A land of demented carnivals, vampires, and shipwrecks. A land of men living lives of solitude and borderline insanity. It's not a happy place. It's dark, there's no color and the locals aren't very friendly. You won't like your first visit to Spiderland. But there's something beautiful about it. Something that always keeps you coming back.
--TJ_Hastie, RYM

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#319. R.E.M. | Reckoning (1984)
# of Voters: 14 | Score: 652.252
Rank in 2014: #189
AM 3000 Rank: #572
Top Fans: BryanBehar (#2), Brad (#29), Listyguy (#55), SJner (#97)
Declaring Reckoning to be R.E.M.'s "best" album sells short just how many different kinds of great albums R.E.M. have released. But, more so than any other R.E.M. record, Reckoning is unified and energized by the very restlessness that has driven the band to explore so many different ideas and identities. It is this paradoxical engine of transparency and mystery that has made the band so unique, regardless of the particular approach they choose to take for a given record. Any way you look at it, this is R.E.M.
--Matt LeMay, Pitchfork

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#318. Deep Purple | Machine Head (1972)
# of Voters: 15 | Score: 656.653
Rank in 2014: #370
AM 3000 Rank: #261
Top Fans: Chambord (#13), Profeta (#45), Red Ant (#45), Nicolas (#70), Bruno (#80)
For 1972, this thing could crush the earth. And bandleader Ritchie Blackmore knew it too. Purple has recorded arguably the greatest Ballad on their entire career in "When A Blind Man Cries" during the sessions for Machine Head. Ritchie flatly refused to have it on the album. He knew Purple had laid down a Metal masterpiece for the ages and refused to let anything mar it's towering heaviness.
--DarthKarl, RYM

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#317. The Who | The Who Sell Out (1967)
# of Voters: 17 | Score: 658.547
Rank in 2014: #244
AM 3000 Rank: #309
Top Fans: BangJan (#29), Miguel (#36), Babydoll (#51), Harold (#52), PlasticRam (#70), SonofsamIAm (#85)
Let it be known that there is no maximum r&b on this album. The Who Sell Out is probably as far from selling out as they could go, too. This album is extremely psychedelic and weird. It is, for lack of a better word, far out. This was the Who’s first concept album. Basically, the album is supposed to be a broadcast from Radio London. Intertwined between all the songs are little jingles, adding to the realism. This was something never really done before and the result is satisfying
--wetwillies, RYM

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#316. Notorious B.I.G. | Ready to Die (1994)
# of Voters: 13 | Score: 661.172
Rank in 2014: #499
AM 3000 Rank: #260
Top Fans: Bootsy (#11), Luis15Fernando (#37), Listyguy (#60), Nico (#70), PlasticRam (#83)
Ready to Die isn't just one of the greatest rap albums, or one of the greatest 90s albums, it's one of the greatest albums ever in any genre. Its qualities aren't just one you'd describe with rap's own internal language ('great beats', 'goes hard on the mic') but with more genre-general language too, like 'great storytelling', 'diverse', 'moving', 'uplifting', 'depressing'. Those last two are both very important ones, even if they contradict each other, because they explain in turn the appeal of the album's two finest moments. Uplifting isn't a word that gets bandied around gangsta rap much, and depression arguably gets used even less, but in "Juicy" and "Suicidal Thoughts", Biggie gave us one of the biggest feelgood anthems in rap history and then bottomed it out with one of the most emotionally harrowing tracks of the decade, if not all time.
--Iai, RYM

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#315. Moby | Play (1999)
# of Voters: 17 | Score: 662.525
Rank in 2014: #195
AM 3000 Rank: #326
Top Fans: Michel (#50), ProsecutorGodot (#99)
But - and I hate to draw this wide and vague of a conclusion - this is one album where you just go with it. Moby's taking things you could swear you've heard before (those synthesized strings in "Honey" do it for me straight off), putting them through a method you've heard before, but he's somehow managing to make the sounds new in the process; he applies them almost carelessly (but not really), until hey, whaddya know: that slide guitar in "Find My Baby" that you've heard a million times still sounds bad-ass! Sure, the piano that frames "Why Does Me Heart Feel So Bad?" is outwardly dramatic (and anticipatory of drama). Sure, you may prefer "God's Gonna Cut You Down" to the soft, happy jitter of "Run On". Sure, the piano pouring open in the middle of "Rushing" may be a cheap trick. But can you think of an album that's applied these kind of tropes this prettily, and in such a memorable package? There's just something refreshing about this music, even today. It doesn't aim for anywhere other than a spaced-out, relaxed mindset, one of soothing and heedless travel. I don't drive, but Play seems like an ideal album for a long car journey.
--LimedIBagels, RYM

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#314. John Coltrane | Giant Steps (1960)
# of Voters: 16 | Score: 667.081
Rank in 2014: #401
AM 3000 Rank: #376
Top Fans: Babydoll (#18), Gillingham (#31), SJner (#63), Nick (#77), DocBrown (#91)
More than anything, Giant Steps is a display of sheer ability. It is often referred to as the album which reinvigorated the jazz solo, and solos are king here. The title track is a complex, bafflingly intricate series of interlocking, shifting Trane solos that the rest of his band strains to keep pace with. The tempo is insane for such complex textures, but Trane makes it seem effortless. Coltrane attacks these compositions (his own) with the brash confidence of a young master at the top of his game.
--jshopa, RYM

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#313. Frank Ocean | Blonde (2016)
# of Voters: 11 | Score: 668.265
Rank in 2014: N/A
AM 3000 Rank: N/A
Top Fans: JasonBob4567 (#5), GucciLittlePiggy (#19), Renan (#20), Luis15Fernando (#23), NotBrianEno (#60), ChrisK (#74), JWinton (#93
There are moments of love and sweetness and neon-light warmth that outstrip the best of Channel Orange. The sound isn't welcoming in the same way that, say, Donuts (another great nighttime album) is. It's introverted, quiet, and shy, and yet it provides such comfort as "Pink + White" and "Godspeed" and the sublimely beautiful keyboard figure behind the interlude tracks (don't you dare cut them from your track list). It peeks with wide eyes through the blinds on the window before silently opening its front door, gesturing to its couch and sitting across from you, eyebrows raised, understanding completely.
--cosmiagramma, RYM

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#312. Big Star | #1 Record (1972)
# of Voters: 16 | Score: 672.139
Rank in 2014: #270
AM 3000 Rank: #432
Top Fans: Honorio (#79), Listyguy (#91)
Critics tend to prefer the tortured albums, the records that show the internal turmoil of the artist. That’s why the most acclaimed albums of Big Star are the second and the third. But what’s wrong with Big Star first album? It’s an awesome piece of music filled with pop gems and rock tracks, with Californian harmonies and shouted harsh voices, with naturally played acoustic and electric guitars.
--Honorio, RYM

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#311. The Byrds | Mr. Tambourine Man (1965)
# of Voters: 17 | Score: 672.786
Rank in 2014: #340
AM 3000 Rank: #276
Top Fans: BryanBehar (#50), Babydoll (#55), Miguel (#57), RockyRaccoon (#100)
"They're bubbly and high and fast. They're rakish and raffish; there's a certain amount of irony in what they do; they're orange and green and yellow and near."
But, of course, the opposite is also true-- They're melancholy and aerial and slow; they're old and eclectic; there's a certain honesty in what they do; they're steel-grey water in the early morning and red light in the evening and clear sky-blue straight above you and gliding off in the middle distance....
--MrTambourineMan12345, RYM
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Re: AMF Favorite Albums of All-Time -- RESULTS

Post by notbrianeno » Mon Sep 25, 2017 9:21 am

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#310. Sufjan Stevens | The Age of Adz (2010)
# of Voters: 12 | Score: 675.060
Rank in 2014: #426
AM 3000 Rank: #1265
Top Fans: DepecheMode (#17), Nassim (#17), NotBrianEno (#18), Moonbeam (#25)
The instrumentation is really what sets this album apart (understatement of the century right there)... If you take the grand, epic orchestration of John Williams' iconic film scores, augment it with the weird electronics of Radiohead's classic album Kid A, throw in a pinch of Sufjan's previous, folk-oriented work, and turn it up to a deafening volume, you'll end up with The Age of Adz. I honestly don't know how else to describe it. The experience this album gives is like being thrown into a whirlwind of sound and never wanting to get out. What I also admire is how it works with the lyrics to advance the concept. The amazing turbulence of the music fits perfectly with the lyrics' introspectiveness, providing a stunning look into the mind of a troubled person.
--palekidfromohio, RYM

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#309. Novos Baianos | Acabou Chorare (1972)
# of Voters: 12 | Score: 677.757
Rank in 2014: #984
AM 3000 Rank: #2456
Top Fans: Panam (#9), EmilienDelRey (#10), RickyMathias (#15), Victor.Marianoo77 (#16), Toni (#36), Dudumb (#53)
This is their second album, released in 1972. The work displays a strong influence from João Gilberto, with whom they had been together in the preceding year (clearly felt in Moraes' "Acabou Chorare"). But it is not related to bossa nova in any way, consisting of explorations of the group's compositions in acoustic and electric settings, with freshness and originality. The album has some important songs, including "Brasil Pandeiro," a classic by Assis Valente rejected by Carmem Miranda that deals with the appreciation for Brazilian music by American people; "Preta Pretinha"; "Acabou Chorare"; and "Besta é Tu."
--Alvaro Neder, Allmusic

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#308. GZA/Genius | Liquid Swords (1995)
# of Voters: 13 | Score: 682.918
Rank in 2014: #317
AM 3000 Rank: #730
Top Fans: EmilienDelRey (#18), Gillingham (#19), Schaefer.tk (#68), Jirin (#76), Boosty (#88), Jeff (#93)
Now onto the production. I'm just going to say it flat out: It's RZA at his peak. Dark murky beats, kung fu samples, pretty obscure funk samplings. It's all finely crafted and yet sounds incredibly low-fi. But still so modern. RZA seriously doesn't miss a single beat on this showcase of his best. The standouts of course being Shadowboxin', Duel of the Iron Mic, and Liquid Swords. What's so great about this album is that even the Shogun Assassin samples are awesome. RZA really made a masterpiece here, the ambiance is simply outstanding.
The lyrics? They're very down to earth, despite GZA bragging (rightfully to be honest) about his skills on the mic occasionally, he spits some of the best lines (along with the clan) in years. From urban violence to gang life Liquid Swords is actually both great hardcore hip hop and conscious hip hop at the same time. It's simply good shit.
--Elam, RYM

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#307. R.E.M. | Document (1987)
# of Voters: 18 | Score: 685.122
Rank in 2014: #225
AM 3000 Rank: #379
Top Fans: RockyRaccoon (#45), JohnnyBGoode (#56), VanillaFire1000 (#70)
How did this Southern rock band, who had more in common with Wire than with then-popular Peach Staters Georgia Satellites, find a spot in the public consciousness alongside U2, Guns N' Roses, and George Michael, who all more or less owned 1987? R.E.M. cultivated an air of mystery that extended from their music (the obscure lyrics, the refusal to lip sync in videos) to the packaging (mismatched tracklists, head-scratching instructions to "File Under Fire"). And "The One I Love" was an odd choice for a hit: Peter Buck's guitar possesses a rich, strange grain that charges the song with vague menace, especially when he unspools that psych-rock solo, and the mosaic hook itself is split between Stipe shouting "Fire!" in an empty theater and Mike Mills adding a descending countermelody. Lyrically, the song is one contradiction twisting into another: "This one goes out to the one I love/ A simple prop to occupy my time."
--Stephen M. Deusner, Pitchfork

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#306. Robert Wyatt | Rock Bottom (1974)
# of Voters: 14 | Score: 687.898
Rank in 2014: #218
AM 3000 Rank: #219
Top Fans: Nicolas (#1), BangJan (#4), Jackson (#12), SonofSamIAm (#80), Spiderpig (#82)
There is no way to describe this accurately. Millions of overlayered synths and guitars and trumpets flow back and forth, placing you in an oniiric trance that can be best described as floating undisturbed in an alien ocean. It's an intoxicating, isolating experience, unlike any other, gentle and yet very disturbing. All then enriched and intensified by Robert's broken and vulnerable vocals, singing out twisted, confused streams of conciousness, calling for help, begging for forgiveness. All of it one jumbled, fractured lamentation. Dark, sad, terrifying.
--algroth89, RYM

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#305. Cyndi Lauper | She's So Unusual (1983)
# of Voters: 17 | Score: 692.899
Rank in 2014: #312
AM 3000 Rank: #796
Top Fans: LiveinPhoenix (#60), Karla (#70), DocBrown (#81)
It is apparent that particular care went into constructing strong melodies for all of the songs. Most importantly, though, is Cyndi herself. Her voice is strong, utterly unique and versatile. She has the vocal chops to make tracks like the opener "Money Changes Everything" really soar at the climax, tons of quirky character to bring vibrant life to the saucy "She Bop" and the decadent fun of "Girls Just Want to Have Fun", emotional resonance to relay the quivering regret of the excellent Prince cover "When You Were Mine" and the subtle strength to make ballads "Time After Time" and "All Through the Night" the showstoppers that they are. This magical combination of masterful production, songwriting craft and massive personality makes these songs indelibly memorable.
--Moonbeam, RYM

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#304. Jorge Ben | A Tábua De Esmeralda (1974)
# of Voters: 12 | Score: 696.747
Rank in 2014: #746
AM 3000 Rank: #2546
Top Fans: EmilienDelRey (#3), Toni (#7), RickyMathias (#23), Slucs (#39), SonofSamIAm (#62), Antonius (#68)
The music that Ben recorded during this period had tremendous influence on Brazilian musicians at that time and to a great extent helped to ignite the creative explosion that took place in the Brazilian samba rock and samba soul scenes during the '70s. The sound on this particular album is very simple, with the songs being driven by Ben's characteristic acoustic guitar playing together with a bass guitar and percussion. Floating in the background on several tracks are also some nice string arrangements and a double bass. The melodies are magnificently crafted, managing to be catchy and free-flowing without ever feeling banal or predictable.
--Philip Jandovsky, Allmusic

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#303. Nick Drake | Bryter Layter (1970)
# of Voters: 16 | Score: 699.538
Rank in 2014: #428
AM 3000 Rank: #263
Top Fans: Acroamor (#42), SJner (#46), DocBrown (#55), Georgie (#75), Andyd1010 (#79)
Nick Drake's most optimistic and uplifting album, an album whose beauty has flourished and become ever more obvious over the last two decades. Okay, so the majestic "Fly" tends to overshadow much of the album, but each track here is a thing of wonder, the orchestra and woodwind give the whole album a particularly organic and natural feel. It's an album to listen to as you are taking the dog a walk on a cold and brisk morning as the sun starts to peek over the frost-bitten horizon.
--P_Q, RYM

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#302. Burial | Untrue (2007)
# of Voters: 17 | Score: 702.867
Rank in 2014: #217
AM 3000 Rank: #157
Top Fans: Panam (#23), EmilienDelRey (#35), Schaefer.tk (#64), Gillingham (#79), NotBrianEno (#80), Jeff (#100)
Do you know why everyone keeps writing the same review of this album? You know the one-the one with the street lights and the rain and the cold night air and the bus rides and the fast food and the melancholy? The kind that every wise-ass takes the piss out of? I think I know why, and it's the same reason why we sometimes look at a painting and want to live in it. We want to live in a London as stylized and strangely beautiful as the one in Untrue-we want those walks to the corner store at three in the morning, those nights on the subway staring out the window and thinking about the rain, those nights with a crappy omelet and a cup of coffee that tastes like turpentine. Because when you feel misunderstood and lonely, leaning against a lamppost with your sigh captured in the autumn air is much more pleasant an idea than staring glassy-eyed at a computer screen in semen-stained boxers while searching desperately for some sort of music to wake you up and make you feel something. We're not just waxing lyrical about the fog and the moon and the taxis to get likes, we're trying to get closer to the world we were shown in Untrue. It's melancholy as escapism, and it's beautiful.
--cosmiagramma, RYM

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#301. Brian Eno | Here Come the Warm Jets (1974)
# of Voters: 16 | Score: 705.788
Rank in 2014: #250
AM 3000 Rank: #395
Top Fans: Romain (#9), Jackson (#33), ChrisK (#87)
What can you say about an album that by all means should have dated badly and yet sounds more vital and prescient than ever? Every track is a densely packed curio shop of strange sounds,beautiful melodies, and pulsating rhythms with Eno's surreal wordplay and dark humor running through it all like a tightly wound coil of barbed wire.
--unearth, RYM
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Re: AMF Favorite Albums of All-Time -- RESULTS

Post by Henrik » Mon Sep 25, 2017 10:19 am

It's really cool how well Brazilian music is doing.

Great presentation, notbrianeno!
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Re: AMF Favorite Albums of All-Time -- RESULTS

Post by Listyguy » Mon Sep 25, 2017 1:02 pm

Ready to Die :music-rockon: :music-rockon:

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Re: AMF Favorite Albums of All-Time -- RESULTS

Post by StevieFan13 » Mon Sep 25, 2017 1:53 pm

Listyguy wrote:Ready to Die :music-rockon: :music-rockon:
Should've been higher (as should The Blueprint) but I'm glad they both made it!
Music is a world within itself, with a language we all understand - Sir Duke (1976)

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Re: AMF Favorite Albums of All-Time -- RESULTS

Post by panam » Mon Sep 25, 2017 7:30 pm

Jorge Ben and Novos Baianos, good!

Milton Nascimento could appear later, I hope! :)

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Re: AMF Favorite Albums of All-Time -- RESULTS

Post by Harold » Mon Sep 25, 2017 7:54 pm

panam wrote:Jorge Ben and Novos Baianos, good!

Milton Nascimento could appear later, I hope! :)
It seems certain. Looks like Clube made a lot of lists, if the forum search box results are any indication.

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Re: AMF Favorite Albums of All-Time -- RESULTS

Post by Jirin » Mon Sep 25, 2017 11:05 pm

Interesting that hip hop that isn't about gangsters is taking a huge beating in the poll but hip hop that is about gangsters is rising.

Casual murder really that big a selling point?

Hopefully Outkast doesn't fall like Jay Z did.

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Re: AMF Favorite Albums of All-Time -- RESULTS

Post by Harold » Mon Sep 25, 2017 11:41 pm

Jirin wrote:Interesting that hip hop that isn't about gangsters is taking a huge beating in the poll but hip hop that is about gangsters is rising.

Casual murder really that big a selling point?
I posted a too-glib response, thought better, deleted it. I'll just stay an observer of the inevitable extended conversation.

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Re: AMF Favorite Albums of All-Time -- RESULTS

Post by Jackson » Tue Sep 26, 2017 1:45 am

That was a great section, but it also means my favorites took an absolute beating, likely in favor of a bunch of stuff I didn't vote for. Disappointing showing for Spiderland, Untrue (which I should have been on the top voter list for), Here Come the Warm Jets, and Rock Bottom, though there were a lot of individual fans of those albums.

I do love the A Tabua de Esmeralda and Acabou Chorare placements (I voted for both, but with low placements that probably didn't have much of an impact). The Brazilian surge is quite refreshing, though it was predictable if you followed the individual list thread closely.

The final spreadsheet should provide for some interesting comparisons. I bet there's no overlap between the voters of Tago Mago at 324 and Black Holes and Revelations at 323.

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Re: AMF Favorite Albums of All-Time -- RESULTS

Post by DaveC » Tue Sep 26, 2017 2:46 am

Jackson wrote: I bet there's no overlap between the voters of Tago Mago at 324 and Black Holes and Revelations at 323.
I voted for both..... I bet nobody voted for Can & ATCQ & Billy Joel! That may be a safer bet.

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Re: AMF Favorite Albums of All-Time -- RESULTS

Post by notbrianeno » Tue Sep 26, 2017 2:49 am

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#300. Iggy and The Stooges | Raw Power (1973)
# of Voters: 19 | Score: 707.900
Rank in 2014: #238
AM 3000 Rank: #87
Top Fans: Dudumb (#45), Listyguy (#86), Jirin (#98), Harold (#99)
With Raw Power, the Stooges return with a vengeance, exhibiting all the ferocity that characterized them at their livid best, offering a taste of the TV eye to anyone with nerve enough to put their money where their lower jaw flaps. There are no compromises, no attempts to soothe or play games in the hopes of expanding into a fabled wider audience. Raw Power is the pot of quicksand at the end of the rainbow, and if that doesn't sound attractive, then you've been living on borrowed time for far too long.
--Lenny Kaye, Rolling Stone

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#299. Johnny Cash | At Folsom Prison (1968)
# of Voters: 18 | Score: 715.783
Rank in 2014: #251
AM 3000 Rank: #153
Top Fans: ProsecutorGodot (#25), Jeff (#25), Dexter (#65), Schaefer.tk (#72), SonofSamIAm (#74)
Incredible live experience, the best live album I've heard in a long time. Cash plays sympathetically to the prisoners and his audience returns the love. The performer-audience relationship is so strong that at times Johnny Cash sounds like he could be one of the inmates (with full electric band and unearthly talent) just playing songs and cracking jokes amongst his sympathetic peers. This genuine warmth is very rare to hear on tape, especially on a prison recording. The song selection is helpful, inspired even. Murder, prison blues, criminal activity, etc. Johnny Cash plays to his audience, and the results are magic.
--Supafly, RYM

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#298. Os Mutantes | Os Mutantes (1968)
# of Voters: 16 | Score: 716.200
Rank in 2014: #371
AM 3000 Rank: #919
Top Fans: BangJan (#13), RickyMathias (#20), SonofSamIAm (#20), Jackson (#71), Toni (#82), Dudumb (#91)
a wildly inventive trip that assimilates orchestral pop, whimsical psychedelia, musique concrète, found-sound environments -- and that's just the first song! Elsewhere there are nods to Carnaval, albeit with distinct hippie sensibilities, incorporating fuzztone guitars and go-go basslines. Two tracks, "O Relogio" and "Le Premier Bonheur du Jour," work through pastoral French pop, sounding closer to the Swingle Singers than Gilberto Gil
--John Bush, Allmusic

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#297. The Doors | L.A. Woman (1971)
# of Voters: 18 | Score: 719.300
Rank in 2014: #278
AM 3000 Rank: #217
Top Fans: SJner (#36), VeganValentine (#50), Gillingham (#55), Babydoll (#56), Jirin (#60), Profeta (#61)
You can almost see smiles on the non-singing faces here; the group seem to be content with themselves, getting a kick out of watching their crazy frontman burn through his excess and waiting to see where they'd go next. L.A. Woman is a great travel album because it hits the ground running - or at least strutting. It's as if Morrison woke up after a wild night and got on the road. He's gruffer now, and less 'literate.' Sinful? Maybe. But there's no remorse, or at least not nearly enough to hold him down. As David Fricke wrote for the liner notes, 'Morrison was ascending, proud and renewed, eager for the unknown ahead.' Of course, we know now that this 'ascent' didn't peak. But Morrison was so unabashedly 'live fast, die young' in his worldview that he anticipated the end before anyone. The best trips are the ones you barrel through without regret.
--LimedIBagels, RYM

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#296. The War on Drugs | Lost in the Dream (2014)
# of Voters: 20 | Score: 719.976
Rank in 2014: #603
AM 3000 Rank: #236
Top Fans: JWinton (#3), JohnnyBGoode (#41), DocBrown (#65), NotBrianEno (#78)
Lost In The Dream is an honest hour of emotional mania, dejection, and self-identity coupled with a sound that reverberates classic Springsteen era arrangements with disbursements of post alternative adolescence that reminds you you're not quite in the '80s either.
--Infinite_Jest, RYM

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#295. T. Rex | Electric Warrior (1971)
# of Voters: 18 | Score: 721.069
Rank in 2014: #239
AM 3000 Rank: #145
Top Fans: Chambord (#28), VeganValentine (#46), LiveinPhoenix (#68)
Marc had put so much into this production, that like many before him, this was to be his shining star, his beacon of light, calling out from the past, being a force to be reckoned with for anyone foolish enough to stand in his wake. And while that wake has certainly been a cause for consternation by others, it was also Marc’s undoing ... without a doubt, he has created several songs of equal and greater value on following releases, but he was never able to create a consistent body of work to ever equal Electric Warrior; where he fused rock, folk, and the blues in this unparalleled manner, laced with swagger and seduction.
--streetmouse, RYM

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#294. Yes | Close to the Edge (1972)
# of Voters: 17 | Score: 722.544
Rank in 2014: #283
AM 3000 Rank: #531
Top Fans: Jackson (#13), VeganValentine (#26), BangJan (#28),
Miguel (#42), Brad (#53)
With 1971's Fragile having left Yes poised quivering on the brink of what friend and foe acknowledged was the peak of the band's achievement, Close to the Edge was never going to be an easy album to make. Drummer Bill Bruford was already shifting restlessly against Jon Anderson's increasingly mystic/mystifying lyricism, while contemporary reports of the recording sessions depicted bandmate Rick Wakeman, too, as little more than an observer to the vast tapestry that Anderson, Steve Howe, and Chris Squire were creating. For it was vast. Close to the Edge comprised just three tracks, the epic "And You and I" and "Siberian Khatru," plus a side-long title track that represented the musical, lyrical, and sonic culmination of all that Yes had worked toward over the past five years
--Dave Thompson, Allmusic

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#293. Liz Phair | Exile in Guyville (1993)
# of Voters: 18 | Score: 724.917
Rank in 2014: #254
AM 3000 Rank: #254
Top Fans: Antonius (#20), BryanBehar (#35), DocBrown (#60), Jirin (#94)
That's what makes Exile in Guyville work, really - for all the stereotypes that have been spread about this album by various people, it's not just the rantings of an angry harpie. There's emotional subtlety throughout this album, and range too. That's what makes it succeed as a whole despite its faintly ridiculous 18-track length, where the album it's modelled on (Exile on Main Street) didn't. Seperate this from its influence, its reputation, and from Liz Phair's career since, and you'll find that this album still has the power to enchant seventeen years later. Some things - intelligence and craft among them - are timeless.
--Iai, RYM

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#292. Curtis Mayfield | Curis (1970)
# of Voters: 17 | Score: 727.191
Rank in 2014: #345
AM 3000 Rank: #504
Top Fans: EmilienDelRey (#15), Slucs (#29), Jeff (#48), SonofSamIAm (#92), Slick (#93), Gillingham (#98)
Curtis has often been repped as a political artist, and certainly his lyrics are rife with the concerns of the day, but his is a social conscience and he looks for inclusiveness, for the good of everyone. He may sing about the ghetto and the spiritual downward spiral of America, but Curtis is an undeniably positive album, displaying a soul that will not be brought down, no matter what opposition the forces of good face. If "Move On Up" can't put on a smile on your face, I don't know you, but you're probably a bad person. It is a song that celebrates the sheer glory of life, that even at nine minutes long is not hardly long enough for a piece of such unparalleled beauty. Curtis is soul, plain and simple.
--jshopa, RYM

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#291. Bon Iver | Bon Iver, Bon Iver (2011)
# of Voters: 19 | Score: 728.430
Rank in 2014: #438
AM 3000 Rank: #393
Top Fans: DepecheMode (#22), ChrisK (#42), GucciLittlePiggy (#72), M24 (#90)
After the closeness and austerity of For Emma, Vernon has given us a knotty record that resists easy interpretation but is no less warm or welcoming. You can feel it even as you don't completely understand it-- a testament to its careful construction and Vernon's belief in the power of music to convey deeper meaning. It's a rare thing for an album to have such a strong sense of what it wants to be. Bon Iver is about flow, from one scene and arrangement and song and memory and word into the next-- each distinct but connected-- all leading to "Beth/Rest". On the way there, the music moves like a river, every bend both unpredictable and inevitable as it carves sound and emotion out of silence.
--Mark Richardson, Pitchfork
Current AOTY 2020: Fiona Apple | Fetch the Bolt Cutters
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Re: AMF Favorite Albums of All-Time -- RESULTS

Post by notbrianeno » Tue Sep 26, 2017 4:13 am

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#290. Tears for Fears | Songs from the Big Chair (1985)
# of Voters: 19 | Score: 729.353
Rank in 2014: #516
AM 3000 Rank: #1220
Top Fans: Slucs (#31), ProsecutorGodtot (#39), Renan (#55), Profeta (#79), Henry (#82)
If The Hurting was mental anguish, Songs from the Big Chair marks the progression towards emotional healing, a particularly bold sort of catharsis culled from Roland Orzabal and Curt Smith's shared attraction to primal scream therapy. The album also heralded a dramatic maturation in the band's music, away from the synth-pop brand with which it was (unjustly) seared following the debut, and towards a complex, enveloping pop sophistication. The songwriting of Orzabal, Smith, and keyboardist Ian Stanley took a huge leap forward, drawing on reserves of palpable emotion and lovely, protracted melodies that draw just as much on soul and R&B music as they do on immediate pop hooks. The album could almost be called pseudo-conceptual, as each song holds its place and each is integral to the overall tapestry, a single-minded resolve that is easy to overlook when an album is as commercially successful as Songs from the Big Chair.
--Stanton Swihart, Allmusic

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#289. The Velvet Underground | Loaded (1970)
# of Voters: 15 | Score: 733.780
Rank in 2014: #144
AM 3000 Rank: #244
Top Fans: Romain (#39), Brad (#43), VanillaFire1000 (#44), SJner (#54), RockyRacooon (#74), ChrisK (#91)
The pretentions of making "ART" is buried and the songwriting shines clear on its own. Despite a strange, unpolished production, and a band performance that seems rather anonymous, this album stands tall. On a second thougth: perhaps this is the secret of the beauty, just to let the songs shine through some greasy filter. It sounds like they really didn't believe in this. It sounds so relaxed.
--dcha, RYM

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#288. The B-52's | The B-52's (1979)
# of Voters: 18 | Score: 734.397
Rank in 2014: #290
AM 3000 Rank: #456
Top Fans: Maschine_Man (#5), SweepstakesRon (#51), VanillaFire100 (#69), DocBrown (#82), Harold (#84)
A good band manages to develop a sound of their own and make it reasonably palpable to the audience's tastes. Now, the B-52s developed a completely new style by reworking some music formulas and iconographic fashion with a touch definitely of their own, managing to sound and look unique. Their old fashioned image was a perfect match for their surf music choruses and psychedelic organ work, yet it was also a perfect contrast to their sophisticated new wave sound.
--sergegrone, RYM

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#287. The Jesus & Mary Chain | Psychocandy (1985)
# of Voters: 19 | Score: 734.937
Rank in 2014: #178
AM 3000 Rank: #79
Top Fans: ChrisK (#47), SJner (#48), BleuPanda (#49), Jackson (#94), BryanBehar (#99)
If the band had applied these tactics to knotty, difficult music, you would never have heard of them, and Dominique Leone would be reviewing these reissues. Luckily-- intuitively-- the JAMC wrote pop songs, basic three-chord rock’n’roll and all-hook melodies, vaguely in the style of early Beach Boys, girl groups, or the laid-back end of the Rolling Stones. Only...as played by lazy, spiteful, nearly hopeless people who didn’t care one way or the other and therefore covered the whole thing in screeching. (See also: the Velvet Underground.)
--Nitsuh Abebe, Pitchfork

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#286. Violent Femmes | Violent Femmes (1983)
# of Voters: 15 | Score: 735.290
Rank in 2014: #266
AM 3000 Rank: #287
Top Fans: Acroamor (#38), SJner (#57), Nassim (#70), BleuPanda (#74), Slick (#87)
Violent Femmes is an absolutely genius album because of just how many trademarks it can be tied to: the first ever folk-punk album, perhaps the catchiest punk release of the 1980's, and the heavily beaten punching bag for millions of at the time teenage Americans undergoing the post-Vietnam life of strife and mediocrity where the standard of living was just high enough for boys and girls to envelop themselves in previously unimportant affairs with heavy hearts. That was the time at which this was released, and it speaks volumes not only for the template of the era but still applies to heartbroken nostalgia-fiends everywhere.
--HotOpinions, RYM

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#285. The Rolling Stones | Aftermath (1966)
# of Voters: 19 | Score: 736.602
Rank in 2014: #207
AM 3000 Rank: #142
Top Fans: Slick (#23), Honorio (#61), GabeBasso (#63), RockyRaccoon (#88), Schaefer.tk (#92)
Aftermath finds The Stones at a critical juncture in their musical development, tossing off the shackles of their initial style and embracing dark, mean, dirty rock and roll, staying ahead of the style curve. This is where they cemented themselves as a true elemental force, and the reason they have weathered the decades since.
--jshopa, RYM

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#284. Roxy Music | For Your Pleasure (1973)
# of Voters: 20 | Score: 737.800
Rank in 2014: #211
AM 3000 Rank: #110
Top Fans: Moonbeam (#27), SJner (#40), Jirin (#56)
Roxy also illuminate the slower numbers, such as the eerie "In Every Dream Home a Heartache," with atonal, shimmering synthesizers, textures that were unexpected and innovative at the time of its release. Similarly, all of For Your Pleasure walks the tightrope between the experimental and the accessible, creating a new vocabulary for rock bands, and one that was exploited heavily in the ensuing decade.
--Stephen Thomas Erlewine, Allmusic

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#283. Neil Young & Crazy Horse | Rust Never Sleeps (1979)
# of Voters: 17 | Score: 739.072
Rank in 2014: #128
AM 3000 Rank: #154
Top Fans: VeganValentine (#25), SJner (#43), Harold (#78), Honorio (#98)
Neil Young has always struck me as a somewhat schizophrenic artist, rattling between noisy guitar-rock which could be either thrilling or dragged out beyond all reasonable endurance and his softer acoustic side, which could either be touching and well-judged, or bland and uninspired. The two sides of his muse rarely acknowledged the existence of the other and when he tried to blend the two it usually ended up bloody mess. Rust Never Sleeps is where the two sides of Young's persona finally came together in perfect harmony and it resulted in his best album.
--p_q, RYM

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#282. Eric B. & Rakim | Paid in Full (1987)
# of Voters: 17 | Score: 740.617
Rank in 2014: #467
AM 3000 Rank: #330
Top Fans: Luis15Fernando (#13), OrdinaryPerson (#69), Boosty (#71), Schaefer.tk (#89)
That said, Rakim sounds cool as fuck, and that in itself is enough of a change in the culture: the Def Jam artists before Rakim? They made you think they were cool. History has borne out that they weren't that cool, they just knew what cool felt like, and proliferated cool to their benefit. Rakim would've been cool with or without the fame; it just so happened happened Cara Lewis was their agent, Norby-Walters was their agency and Rushtown Management was who they were rolling with. It just so happened that Rakim was the first stellar rapper on record. Also, Eric B. more than holds his own here with the scratching on his solo cut, his treatment of "Change the Beat" and all the other flourishes folks have allegedly tied to Rakim over time (like, fine, tell me he made "Chinese Arithmetic"; I'm all ears, but that shit is stupid dumb good and Eric B. got his name on four albums for a reason). I don't care what people say - this was and always will be the duo that knew what it meant to get hype and listen to the man on the mic.
--Nodima, RYM

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#281. OutKast | Aquemini (1998)
# of Voters: 15 | Score: 742.884
Rank in 2014: #311
AM 3000 Rank: #481
Top Fans: Jeff (#9), GucciLittlePiggy (#31), EmilienDelRey (#37), SonofSamIAm (#69), Bootsy (#86)
Even compared to their already excellent and forward-looking catalog, OutKast's sprawling third album, Aquemini, was a stroke of brilliance. The chilled-out space-funk of ATLiens had already thrown some fans for a loop, and Aquemini made it clear that its predecessor was no detour, but a stepping stone for even greater ambitions. Some of ATLiens' ethereal futurism is still present, but more often Aquemini plants its feet on the ground for a surprisingly down-home flavor. The music draws from a vastly eclectic palette of sources, and the live instrumentation is fuller-sounding than ATLiens. Most importantly, producers Organized Noize imbue their tracks with a Southern earthiness and simultaneous spirituality that come across regardless of what Dre and Big Boi are rapping about. Not that they shy away from rougher subject matter, but their perspective is grounded and responsible, intentionally avoiding hardcore clichés. Their distinctive vocal deliveries are now fully mature, with a recognizably Southern rhythmic bounce but loads more technique than their territorial peers. Those flows grace some of the richest and most inventive hip-hop tracks of the decade.
--Steve Huey, Allmusic
Current AOTY 2020: Fiona Apple | Fetch the Bolt Cutters
Current SOTY 2020: Tame Impala | "On Track"

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Re: AMF Favorite Albums of All-Time -- RESULTS

Post by StevieFan13 » Tue Sep 26, 2017 4:33 am

Quite pleased with this batch! And an impressive finish for Tears for Fears.
Music is a world within itself, with a language we all understand - Sir Duke (1976)

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Re: AMF Favorite Albums of All-Time -- RESULTS

Post by bootsy » Tue Sep 26, 2017 4:53 am

Most happy for Tears for Fears. Well deserved.

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Re: AMF Favorite Albums of All-Time -- RESULTS

Post by veganvalentine » Tue Sep 26, 2017 6:17 am

Damn, looks like we're in line for nearly all of REM's catalog. Also, I'll have to check out these Brazilian albums--nice to see some underrepresented countries showing up.

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Re: AMF Favorite Albums of All-Time -- RESULTS

Post by bootsy » Tue Sep 26, 2017 1:56 pm

veganvalentine wrote:Damn, looks like we're in line for nearly all of REM's catalog. Also, I'll have to check out these Brazilian albums--nice to see some underrepresented countries showing up.
Had 3 R.E.M. albums so far. How much more are you expecting?

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Re: AMF Favorite Albums of All-Time -- RESULTS

Post by Harold » Tue Sep 26, 2017 2:14 pm

bootsy wrote:
veganvalentine wrote:Damn, looks like we're in line for nearly all of REM's catalog.
Had 3 R.E.M. albums so far. How much more are you expecting?
Looks like there are three more to go. I don't really understand vv's comment, unless it's meant as a complaint that R.E.M. are going to wind up with a fairly large number of albums (not "nearly all") on the top 1000. They're one of the most acclaimed rock bands of all time, so obviously they're going to do well on an all-time list - what of it?

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Re: AMF Favorite Albums of All-Time -- RESULTS

Post by StevieFan13 » Tue Sep 26, 2017 2:37 pm

Harold wrote:
bootsy wrote:
veganvalentine wrote:Damn, looks like we're in line for nearly all of REM's catalog.
Had 3 R.E.M. albums so far. How much more are you expecting?
Looks like there are three more to go. I don't really understand vv's comment, unless it's meant as a complaint that R.E.M. are going to wind up with a fairly large number of albums (not "nearly all") on the top 1000. They're one of the most acclaimed rock bands of all time, so obviously they're going to do well on an all-time list - what of it?
I think it's more surprise that all of them are making the cut, even stuff like the Chronic Town EP. Not necessarily grumpiness, but more surprise that the whole lot made it. I, for one, am delighted.
Music is a world within itself, with a language we all understand - Sir Duke (1976)

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Re: AMF Favorite Albums of All-Time -- RESULTS

Post by bootsy » Tue Sep 26, 2017 5:30 pm

Harold wrote:
bootsy wrote:
veganvalentine wrote:Damn, looks like we're in line for nearly all of REM's catalog.
Had 3 R.E.M. albums so far. How much more are you expecting?
Looks like there are three more to go. I don't really understand vv's comment, unless it's meant as a complaint that R.E.M. are going to wind up with a fairly large number of albums (not "nearly all") on the top 1000. They're one of the most acclaimed rock bands of all time, so obviously they're going to do well on an all-time list - what of it?
Don't think it's a complaint. It didn't make sense to me because there are already 3 as if there hadn't been any yet and he is anticipating a big R.E.M. rollout for the last 300. I'm expecting a few more too but definitely not nearly all of their catalog.

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Re: AMF Favorite Albums of All-Time -- RESULTS

Post by Amoux » Tue Sep 26, 2017 9:24 pm

I'm really pleased to see Exile in Guyville on the list. A top 10 album for me and a fairly misunderstood album as far as critically acclaimed albums go. RYM don't even place it in their top 3000 which is insane... :)

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Re: AMF Favorite Albums of All-Time -- RESULTS

Post by notbrianeno » Wed Sep 27, 2017 1:43 am

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#280. George Harrison | All Things Must Pass (1970)
# of Voters: 19 | Score: 743.074
Rank in 2014: #287
AM 3000 Rank: #288
Top Fans: Georgie (#13), VeganValentine (#91)
Today, albums like this are a bit like old ruins: They are important to keep around, even if they mostly remind us of what has changed. This dichotomy is the kind of thing that Harrison, who exited the earth in 2001, would probably have appreciated. All Things Must Pass is a monument to impermanence that has never once, even for a moment, left us.
--Jayson Greene, Pitchfork

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#279. Steve Reich | Music for 18 Musicians (1978)
# of Voters: 15 | Score: 744.142
Rank in 2014: #569
AM 3000 Rank: #761
Top Fans: SonofSamIAm (#4), Spiderpig (#9), DocBrown (#29), Acroamor (#51), EmilienDelRey (#66), DaveC (#70), Spiritualized (#88)
More than anything else I have ever heard, this piece stretches out to infinity. The musical horizon is nowhere to be seen. Whenever I listen to this, my mind's eye is filled with huge, natural panoramas. This is not a coincidence: the symmetry of the album alludes to the presence of symmetrical forms throughout nature, while ensuring the album can not be considered as a simple 'start to finish' narrative. The opening and conclusion are exactly the same, making the piece the grandest form of loop I have ever heard. Within that there is the mise en abyme of loops within loops within loops, each instrument forming its own shimmering surface of perfect symmetry.
--Buttgammon, RYM

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#278. The Velvet Underground | White Light / White Heat (1968)
# of Voters: 18 | Score: 748.080
Rank in 2014: #177
AM 3000 Rank: #193
Top Fans: Brad (#37), Romain (#52), Bootsy (#75), Babydoll (#95)
Punk fans, rejoice. Here’s one of the earliest examples of New York punk that you can lay your hands on. Sheer cacophony with unbridled adrenaline. Microphone leaks all over the place, muffled lyrics, distorted instruments, it’s all there. Highly influential. Novice fans, don’t start here if you think the VU is a mere pop band that only puts out notions like “Pale Blue Eyes” and “Sweet Jane”. White Light/White Heat is as dark as its album sleeve. The right people will understand. Everyone else still tends to keep away. But that’s all right, as the latter-day VU albums still tend to win those people over.
--Jason Thompson, Popmatters

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#277. Pretenders | Pretenders (1980)
# of Voters: 21 | Score: 749.586
Rank in 2014: #253
AM 3000 Rank: #163
Top Fans: Harold (#44)
A masterpiece which crossed all boundaries of music styles, genres and fads that the late 1970s/early1980s spawned by the dozen.
Indeed, Pretenders' eponymous first album is as classical as it is modern and Chrissie Hynde's vocal performance was peerless at the time.
--Popphil, RYM

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#276. Funkadelic/Parliament | Maggot Brain (1971)
# of Voters: 19 | Score: 751.908
Rank in 2014: #282
AM 3000 Rank: #480
Top Fans: SonofSamIAm (#10), Slucs (#49), Antonius (#62), PlasticRam (#71)
As it starts off on Hazel’s stratospheric plain, strung-out earthly energy returns for the finale, taunting the listening senses on 'Wars of Armageddon', a cornucopia of magician's hat sound effects, sexually arousing reverb and cunning use of tracking, urban tales freed from their concrete shackles to roam galaxies music had previously failed to grasp even existed.
--KildareJohn, RYM

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#275. Marvin Gaye| Let's Get It On (1973)
# of Voters: 17 | Score: 752.120
Rank in 2014: #341
AM 3000 Rank: #224
Top Fans: Slucs (#18), Profeta (#50), Karla (#67), Babydoll (#87)
He says he won't push it, and he usually doesn't; this is more or less even with What's Going On as Marvin's best album, and though its highs aren't quite as high and it's certainly less ambitious - no zeitgeist politics, just loving and fucking - and probably not quite as good, it's more consistent and it generally sounds richer: the strings are subtler this time, not as soupy or schmaltzy but just colorful — and that's surprising, as you might reasonably anticipate sounds of the sex album and the politics album to be exactly reversed.
--LimedIBagels, RYM

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#274. The Band | Music From Big Pink (1968)
# of Voters: 20 | Score: 756.701
Rank in 2014: #249
AM 3000 Rank: #86
Top Fans: SJner (#73), Acroamor (#76)
The dominant instrument was Garth Hudson's often icy and majestic organ, while Robbie Robertson's unusual guitar work further destabilized the sound. The result was an album that reflected the turmoil of the late '60s in a way that emphasized the tragedy inherent in the conflicts. Music from Big Pink came off as a shockingly divergent musical statement only a year after the ornate productions of Sgt. Pepper, and initially attracted attention because of the three songs Bob Dylan had either written or co-written. However, as soon as "The Weight" became a minor singles chart entry, the album and the group made their own impact, influencing a movement toward roots styles and country elements in rock. Over time, Music from Big Pink came to be regarded as a watershed work in the history of rock, one that introduced new tones and approaches to the constantly evolving genre.
--William Ruhlmann, Allmusic

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#273. Miles Davis | Sketches of Spain (1960)
# of Voters: 16 | Score: 760.461
Rank in 2014: #323
AM 3000 Rank: #437
Top Fans: Babydoll (#6), VanillaFire1000 (#46), Bootsy (#61), Michel (#86), Schaefer.tk (#88)
It opens with a march and a fanfare, and then Davis blasts an uncanny solo-- slow, choosing between a small handful of notes, but so intent and concentrated that his trumpet almost seems to be splintering. The contrasts between Evans velvety but complex backdrops and Davis' extemporaneous work out front is compelling from start to finish.
--Mark Richardson, Pitchfork

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#272. Beastie Boys | Licensed to Ill (1986)
# of Voters: 14 | Score: 773.072
Rank in 2014: #301
AM 3000 Rank: #191
Top Fans: Slick (#30), Bootsy (#37), Dexter (#38), ProsecutorGodot (#53), Whuntva (#86)
While this album has long been overshadowed by their subsequent huge achievements, it still impresses. A lot of it comes off dumb, but tempered enough by their innate cleverness and their later willingness to let their geek flags fly that it's clearly a perfectly constructed character stance with a sense of fun bigger than all outdoors. Their flow is distinctive as hell, with each of the boys having a distinct personality within the group right from the beginning, even if sometimes they're just yelling shit more than they could really be classified as rapping, and for an album I have listened to for over twenty years, it's incredible that there are still lines that will make me laugh out loud
--jshopa, RYM

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#271. The Who | Quadrophrenia (1973)
# of Voters: 18 | Score: 773.226
Rank in 2014: #256
AM 3000 Rank: #423
Top Fans: Red Ant (#37), Profeta (#42), Whuntva (#42), Henry (#63), JWinton (#72)
Quadrophenia is the Who at their most symmetrical, their most cinematic, ultimately their most maddening. Captained by Pete Townshend, they have put together a beautifully performed and magnificently recorded essay of a British youth mentality in which they played no little part, lushly endowed with black and white visuals and a heavy sensibility of the wet-suffused air of 1965.
--Lenny Kaye, Rolling Stone
Current AOTY 2020: Fiona Apple | Fetch the Bolt Cutters
Current SOTY 2020: Tame Impala | "On Track"

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notbrianeno
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Re: AMF Favorite Albums of All-Time -- RESULTS

Post by notbrianeno » Wed Sep 27, 2017 2:54 am

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#270. The Police | Synchronicity (1983)
# of Voters: 17 | Score: 774.024
Rank in 2014: #258
AM 3000 Rank: #283
Top Fans: Profeta (#29), Toni (#42), Renan (#42), RockyRaccoon (#64), Bruno (#66), Nico (#66), Slick (#74)
Synchronicity is a work of dazzling surfaces and glacial shadows. Sunny pop melodies echo with ominous sound effects. Pithy verses deal with doomsday. A battery of rhythms — pop, reggae and African — lead a safari into a physical and spiritual desert, to "Tea in the Sahara." Synchronicity, the Police's fifth and finest album, is about things ending — the world in peril, the failure of personal relationships and marriage, the death of God.
--Stephen Holden, Rolling Stone

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#269. Pink Floyd | The Piper at the Gates of Dawn (1967)
# of Voters: 18 | Score: 774.054
Rank in 2014: #375
AM 3000 Rank: #108
Top Fans: BangJang (#36), DaveC (#44), Dudumb (#75), GabeBasso (#88)
It's in the nature of the beast for Piper to be hard to pin down. Cohesion is not its strength; you have sublime hooks and melodies on the one hand, and complete outlandishness on the other. Bits of brilliance weave into consciousness, only to be undermined by a surge of cathedral-like grandeur or an outbreak of atonal doodling. It's all too easy to read Barrett's state of mind into this, especially with the benefit of hindsight, but if anything it seems to me that Piper, in its own slightly backhanded way, is striving to re-enchant the world, providing a liberating ride along the way.
--resist_retreat, RYM

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#268. Coldplay | Parachutes (2000)
# of Voters: 20 | Score: 775.823
Rank in 2014: #432
AM 3000 Rank: #539
Top Fans: Victor.Marioanoo77 (#43), ProsecutorGodot (#71), Andyd1010 (#76)
All told, it’s incredible this is a debut album. Accomplished, yet subtle, it works perfectly as a whole in a way all the production skills in the world couldn’t replicate. Forget trashing rooms and rent-a-quotes, just listen. This really is all that matters.
--NME

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#267. Gang of Four | Entertainment! (1979)
# of Voters: 20 | Score: 779.402
Rank in 2014: #193
AM 3000 Rank: #152
Top Fans: DaveC (#13), SJner (#60), Harold (#65), LiveinPhoenix (#77), GucciLittlePiggy (#87)
Entertainment! is one of those records where germs of influence can be traced through many genres and countless bands, both favorably and unfavorably. From groups whose awareness of genealogy spreads wide enough to openly acknowledge Gang of Four's influence (Fugazi, Rage Against the Machine), to those not in touch with their ancestry enough to realize it (rap-metal, some indie rock) -- all have appropriated elements of their forefathers' trailblazing contribution. Its vaguely funky rhythmic twitch, its pungent, pointillistic guitar stoccados, and its spoken/shouted vocals have all been picked up by many.
--Andy Kellman, Allmusic

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#266. Talk Talk | Spirit of Eden (1988)
# of Voters: 17 | Score: 780.513
Rank in 2014: #201
AM 3000 Rank: #370
Top Fans: SonofSamIAm (#22), BangJan (#24), Schaefer.tk (#35), Gillingham (#59), Spiritualized (#69), DaveC (#83)
Spirit of Eden was fueled by Hollis’ own life and death struggle. Having been addicted to heroin, he arrived at the conclusion that this prop, too, had to be kicked away. The terror of letting go of the one thing that gave a false sense of control inspired the cavernous sound of the record, and within those echoing canyons Hollis pushed through to resolution.
--Chuck Hicks, Popmatters

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#265. The Kinks | Something Else (1967)
# of Voters: 20 | Score: 781.578
Rank in 2014: #174
AM 3000 Rank: #338
Top Fans: Zombeels (#11), Honorio (#78)
Face to Face was a remarkable record, but its follow-up, Something Else, expands its accomplishments, offering 13 classic British pop songs. As Ray Davies' songwriting becomes more refined, he becomes more nostalgic and sentimental, retreating from the psychedelic and mod posturings that had dominated the rock world. Indeed, Something Else sounds like nothing else from 1967. The Kinks never rock very hard on the album, preferring acoustic ballads, music hall numbers, and tempered R&B to full-out guitar attacks. Part of the album's power lies in its calm music, since it provides an elegant support for Davies' character portraits and vignettes.
--Stephen thomas Erlewine, Allmusic

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#264. TV on the Radio | Dear Science (2008)
# of Voters: 19 | Score: 784.977
Rank in 2014: #191
AM 3000 Rank: #429
Top Fans: Toni (#20), Jackson (#69), DaveC (#71)
A magnifying glass to shift and zoom into focus the dramatizations of humdrum existence. Uninhibited sex, expansive drugs and expressionistic violence are its synonyms, the prevailing doldrums of aneristic principle its primary target. A heroic dose of soulful subversion dressed up as a box of disposable candy.
--unearth, RYM

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#263. Godspeed You! Black Emperor | Lift Yr. Skinny Fists Like Antennas to Heaven (2000)
# of Voters: 15 | Score: 785.927
Rank in 2014: #322
AM 3000 Rank: #469
Top Fans: Gillingham (#15), NotBrianeno (#20), DocBrown (#33), Acroamor (#41), Chambord (#49), Brad (#80), Listyguy (#94)
I like to tell people that post rock is the modern-day equivalent to classical music, and when they doubt me, I always pick something from this album as proof. The composition here is (I can put it no more intently) exquisite. The feeling of sitting down and listening to this is such a rush to the head and such a blow of pure wonder that I don't know how people aren't promoting this record to no end. You can sit back and see things differently when you hear this. You can reflect on what's important in life, and you can find the motivation to do the things that you know you should be doing, but aren't. You can expose yourself head-on, into a place where there's only you, yourself, and that guy in your mirror. You know the one, he's always there.
--vito_James, RYM

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#262. John Lennon | Imagine (1971)
# of Voters: 19 | Score: 789.203
Rank in 2014: #206
AM 3000 Rank: #90
Top Fans: Bootsy (#45), Zombeels (#83)
Imagine on the other hand presents a much more 'together' Lennon. Imagine has so much more variety, where John Lennon/Plastic Ono Band seemed black and white, Imagine is like a rainbow. There are still slower songs which may appear to be sad, but they are lined with hope. Instead of Lennon sounding self loathing and resigned, he comes as across as angry on songs such as 'Gimme Some Truth' which is almost punk. And just to show how happier he is there is probably the most joyous song he has ever sung in 'Oh Yoko!'.
--darren86, RYM

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#261. D'Angelo and The Vanguard| Black Messiah (2014)
# of Voters: 20 | Score: 789.687
Rank in 2014: N/A
AM 3000 Rank: #937
Top Fans: Jeff (#7), Slucs (#17), Gillingham (#21), Karla (#65), Antonius (#82)
It tops Voodoo, probably my favourite record of the past two decades. Actually, given it's been 14 years since that record, what's interesting is just how continuous Black Messiah is. The difference is the hazy stoned atmosphere of Voodoo has hardened into paranoia, with a palpable sense of apocalypse in the air. Where is a man to find redemption? Well, in love of course, and the love songs here are wonderful. This is music that cuts hard, that matters. Maybe I need it too much, but this sounds like the album of the year.
--BradL, RYM
Current AOTY 2020: Fiona Apple | Fetch the Bolt Cutters
Current SOTY 2020: Tame Impala | "On Track"

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notbrianeno
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Re: AMF Favorite Albums of All-Time -- RESULTS

Post by notbrianeno » Wed Sep 27, 2017 3:43 am

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#260. Joanna Newsom | Ys (2006)
# of Voters: 20 | Score: 793.264
Rank in 2014: #293
AM 3000 Rank: #277
Top Fans: NotBrianEno (#5), LiveInPhoenix (#31), Maschine_Man (#37), Gillingham (#60), JWinton (#87)
The musicianship on Ys is superb, as Newsom is supported by - get this! - Jim O'Rourke, Steve Albini and, especially, Van Dyke Parks, whose string arrangements enrich the songs enormously. The songs' meanings are far from definitive, and Newsom's narration and lyrics will send you off on some magical unintelligible journey. I, for one, have my own view on, for example, "Monkey and Bear" or "Cosmia", as much as anybody does - it's about whatever images your mind conjures, drown in this lush, astonishing beauty of an album. But what I love the most about Ys are its rich and evocative little segments; even individual verses, like in "Emily" or in "Only Skin" capture so much whimsicality, profoundness, and tragic awareness of all things passed, present and future with its poignant and touching lyrics that they could be analyzed ad infinitum.
--dejan-malcic, RYM

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#259. Madonna | Like a Prayer (1989)
# of Voters: 17 | Score: 794.419
Rank in 2014: #243
AM 3000 Rank: #343
Top Fans: Moonbeam (#6), Profeta (#25), Bruno (#46), Nico (#48), Karla (#68), Honorio (#74), OrdinaryPerson (#88), SonofSamIAm (#96)
Like a Prayer does showcase her growth as a pop artist, from the gnarled guitar that opens its title track all the way through its warped-tape closer “Act of Contrition.” She takes more chances lyrically and musically, and while they don’t always work, they do give a glimpse at her restlessness and increased willingness to take musical chances, whether she’s bringing in Prince or letting her voice’s imperfections into songs or taking on heavy, personal-life-adjacent topics.
--Maura Johnston, Pitchfork

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#258. Tracy Chapman | Tracy Chapman (1988)
# of Voters: 19 | Score: 795.562
Rank in 2014: #216
AM 3000 Rank: #488
Top Fans: DocBrown (#14), VanillaFire1000 (#20), JohnnyBGoode (#63), BonnieLaurel (#76), M24 (#85)
Tracy Chapman’s self-titled debut contains music that is as soulful as we may ever hear. She doesn’t wear her heart just on her sleeve, she wears it everywhere. Lyrics and vocals this open and honest scarcely exist this side of Jesus.
--spinningdials, RYM

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#257. Milton Nascimento & Lô Borges | Clube de Esquina (1972)
# of Voters: 14 | Score: 803.635
Rank in 2014: #476
AM 3000 Rank: #1553
Top Fans: Dudumb (#5), Rickymathias (#9), Panam (#12), SonofSamIAm (#18), BangJan (#41), EmilienDelRey (#51), Babydoll (#60)
Clube da Esquina is a variety of dream pop like the Beach Boys at their best and with a better sense of rhythm. Unending choruses and a blanket of strings. Psychedelic bits with fuzzy guitars straight out of Buffalo Springfield cast over smooth terrain. A dash of Beatles' influence here, a little more progressive there. And of course, that attitude and the breezy vocals that the album radiates that can transport you easily to the leisurely life away from the snow bank of doldrums. No wonder then that this is arguably the most iconic album of 1970s Brazil
--lanky_caravan, RYM

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#256. Madvillain | Madvillainy (2004)
# of Voters: 17 | Score: 804.351
Rank in 2014: #415
AM 3000 Rank: #355
Top Fans: EmilienDelRey (#6), Jeff (#12), NotBrianEno (#22), Luis15Fernando (#22), Georgie (#74), Jackson (#80)
This is an undeniably individual release, that bolsters its rightful place on the abstract hip hop throne with the entirely expected and yet somehow still surprising lyrical quality of MF DOOM, spitting a mix of vivid stories and coded braggadocios jeers with a seemingly eternal flow, only pausing for a quarter beat of breathing room every bar, that both complements the jittery, varied production and offers a necessary juxtaposition of playful egoism that contributes to the informal vibe of the album.
--HotOpinions, RYM

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#255. Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young | Déjà Vu (1970)
# of Voters: 17 | Score: 805.752
Rank in 2014: #231
AM 3000 Rank: #158
Top Fans: Antonius (#12), Honorio (#29), VeganValentine (#33), DocBrown (#53), Henry (#60), Gillingham (#69), Red Ant (#72)
All of this variety made Déjà Vu a rich musical banquet for the most serious and personal listeners, while mass audiences reveled in the glorious harmonies and the thundering electric guitars, which were presented in even more dramatic and expansive fashion on the tour that followed.
--Bruce Eder, Allmusic

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#254. Elliott Smith | XO (1998)
# of Voters: 19 | Score: 807.002
Rank in 2014: #240
AM 3000 Rank: #519
Top Fans: LiveinPhoenix (#23), Honorio (#24), Nassim (#32), JohnnyBGoode (#61), Brad (#73)
Much of this album seems to track fleeting moments of personal connection with strangers, clutching to them. I know too well that feeling of placing great importance in the warmth of chance encounters while being unable to reconcile with the hollowness of shielded interaction with all the people who know you well. That honesty of emotion is what makes this slickly produced breakthrough album still deeply intimate.
--jshopa, RYM

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#253. Pink Floyd | Meddle (1971)
# of Voters: 17 | Score: 809.124
Rank in 2014: #286
AM 3000 Rank: #1204
Top Fans: VeganValentine (#3), DaveC (#9), Chambord (#43), OrdinaryPerson (#54), Acroamor (#67)
The transition from Pink Floyd's playful psychedelic beginnings to their more focused and structured forms that would inform their internationally successful work was hardly smooth, littered as it was with questionable double albums, slightly bizarre soundtracks and albums with cows on the cover. It is perhaps surprising then that smack bang in the middle of this period they managed to release one of their most enjoyable and downright 'fun' albums.
--p_q, RYM

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#252. The Magnetic Fields | 69 Love Songs (1999)
# of Voters: 19 | Score: 810.195
Rank in 2014: #130
AM 3000 Rank: #252
Top Fans: LuvulongTIM (#8), Honorio (#32), Jirin (#36), Harold (#41), LiveinPhoenix (#94)
The sum of the parts of 69 Love Songs adds up exactly to its whole. No more, no less. Each song contains its own small epiphany, but they never quite add up to the one big sweeping epiphany that you'd hope for. That's because it's impossible to reconcile the concept of 69 Love Songs with its execution; it's simply too big. That might sound like a cop-out, but this is truly an album you can get lost in. The individual songs will inevitably distract you from a big-picture interpretation of the album. Of course, the Magnetic Fields don't concern themselves with such matters; they promised us 69 love songs, and that's what they delivered.
--Nick Mirov, Pitchfork

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#251. Red Hot Chili Peppers | Californication (1999)
# of Voters: 18 | Score: 819.363
Rank in 2014: #604
AM 3000 Rank: #1109
Top Fans: Renan (#6), Karla (#16), Felipinho (#24), Andyramones1234 (#41), Victor.Marianoo77 (#42)
The quartet's trademark punk-funk can be sampled on such tracks as "Around the World," "I Like Dirt," and "Parallel Universe," but the more pop-oriented material proves to be a pleasant surprise -- "Scar Tissue," "Otherside," "Easily," and "Purple Stain" all contain strong melodies and instantly memorable choruses. And like their 1992 introspective hit "Under the Bridge," there are even a few mellow moments -- "Porcelain," "Road Trippin'," and the title track. With the instrumentalists' interplay at an all-time telepathic high and Kiedis peaking as a vocalist, Californication is a bona fide Chili Peppers classic.
--Greg Prato, Allmusic
Last edited by notbrianeno on Wed Sep 27, 2017 4:02 am, edited 1 time in total.
Current AOTY 2020: Fiona Apple | Fetch the Bolt Cutters
Current SOTY 2020: Tame Impala | "On Track"

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