AMF 1900-1949 Song Poll Results

DaveC
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AMF 1900-1949 Song Poll Results

Postby DaveC » Wed Dec 07, 2016 6:02 am

17 voters voted for 753 different songs.


Number of songs in the AMF top 100 not ranked on AM: 33 (of which 13 are classical)

Highest ranking for song not in AM: 7

Number of new entries (c.f. 2010 poll): 33 (of which 2 are from the 2010 1950s top 100)

Highest new entry: 11

Songs dropping out of top 100:

2016.........2010.....Song
Rank.........Rank
No votes.......67.....Leadbelly-Whoa, Back, Buck
No votes.......66.....Walter Huston-September Song
No votes.......44.....Xavier Cugat-Brazil
612.............84.....Uncle Dave Macon-Way Down the Old Plank Road
436.............64.....George Gershwin-Three Preludes: II. Prelude No. 2
383.............37.....Sergei Rachmaninoff-Piano Concerto No. 3: I. Allegro ma non tanto
328.............77.....Remo Giazotto-(Albinoni's) Adagio in G Minor
259.............95.....Dmitri Shostakovich-Suite for Jazz Orchestra No.1: I. Waltz
230.............70.....Dizzy Gillespie & Sarah Vaughan/Billie Holiday/Charlie Parker-Lover Man (Oh, Where Can You Be?)
227.............85.....Louis Armstrong-Big Fat Ma and Skinny Pa
224.............86.....Manuel de Falla-El amor brujo: X. Canción del fuego fatuo
210.............75.....Leadbelly-The House of the Rising Sun
173.............100....'Buddy Boy' Hawkins-Voice Throwin' Blues
173.............89.....The Lion-Bing Crosby
170.............62.....Son House-My Black Mama / Death Letter
153.............92.....Antonio Álvarez Alonso-Suspiros de España
153.............76.....Olivier Messiaen-Turangalîla-Symphonie: I. Introduction
152.............61.....Blind Willie McTell-Statesboro Blues
149.............90.....Béla Bártok-Music for Strings, Percussions and Celesta: III. Adagio
147.............96.....Rina Ketty-J'attendrai
144.............78.....The Orioles-It's Too Soon to Know
141.............82.....Jack McVea & His All Stars-Open the Door Richard!
127.............97.....Patsy Montana-I Want to Be a Cowboy's Sweetheart
124.............73.....Carlos Gardel-Mano a mano
123.............69.....Lionel Hampton-Wizzin' the Wizz
120.............71.....George W. Johnson-The Laughing Coon
120.............72.....Leadbelly-There's a Man Going Round Taking Names
115.............91.....Duke Ellington / Cootie Williams-Echoes of Harlem
113.............83.....Scott Joplin-The Easy Winners
108.............93.....Lord Invader, Macbeth the Great, Duke of Iron-Calypso War
107.............80.....Growling Tiger-Money Is King
105.............87.....Max Steiner-Tara's Theme
102.............55.....Lotte Lenya-Die Dreigroschenoper: Seeräuber Jenny
Last edited by DaveC on Wed Dec 14, 2016 9:17 am, edited 6 times in total.

jamieW
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Re: AMF 1900-1949 Song Poll Results

Postby jamieW » Wed Dec 07, 2016 12:17 pm

Before DaveC gets started with the presentation (unfortunately, I'm not surprised he's found an error already - this part of the poll really was a challenge to put together), I just wanted to remind everyone that the numbers may be slightly off from their individual lists. Primarily, this is because most people had multiple versions of the same song in their lists (which is fine), but since we're combining versions, I only took the highest ranked and then moved everything up. (In a few cases, this could mean up to a 4-5 place move for some songs near the bottom of their lists.) If you do see something that seems totally out of place, please let me know. I still fear this could be a bumpy ride. (I'm just thankful the other polls went relatively smoothly - with the notable exception of me missing an entire list, of course.)

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Re: AMF 1900-1949 Song Poll Results

Postby DaveC » Wed Dec 07, 2016 8:25 pm

100. Professor Longhair - Mardi Gras in New Orleans

Year of release: 1949
Points: 91.41
Voters: 2
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 195 (5107 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY (58 in our 2010 1950s poll)
Biggest fans: Brad(5)

Wikipedia: One of Longhair's great contributions was the adaptation of Afro-Cuban two-celled, clave-based patterns in New Orleans blues. Michael Campbell stated, "Rhythm and blues influenced by Afro-Cuban music first surfaced in New Orleans. Professor Longhair's influence was ... far reaching. In several of his early recordings, Professor Longhair blended Afro-Cuban rhythms with rhythm and blues." The guajeo-like piano part for the rumba-boogie "Mardi Gras in New Orleans" (1949) employs the 2-3 clave onbeat/offbeat motif.



99. Louis Jordan and His Tympany Five - Five Guys Named Moe

Year of release: 1943
Points: 91.55
Voters: 2
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: Unranked
2010 poll top 100 position: 59 (Change -40)
Biggest fans: Honorio(8)

Honorio: Jump! Never a music style was named so appropriately. Some years ago I bought a compilation of Louis Jordan looking for his widely known "Choo Choo Ch'Boogie" but I became addicted to the first song on that CD, an irressistible uptempo comic number called "Five Guys Named Moe". Those five guys, Big Moe, Little Moe, Four-Eyed Moe, No Moe and Eat Moe, you know, when they start to beat it out / everybody jump and shout. Including me.



98. Django Reinhardt & Stéphane Grapelli - Echoes of France

Year of release: 1946
Points: 91.58
Voters: 1
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: Unranked
2010 poll top 100 position: 58 (Change -40)
Biggest fans: nicolas(2)

DaveC: Interpretation of "La Marseillaise" - recorded when Reinhardt & Grapelli got back together after the second world war.



97. Billie Holiday - Gloomy Sunday
(Combined with Damia - Sombre Dimanche-1936)

Year of release: 1941
Points: 91.65
Voters: 5
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 178 (4719 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: DaveC(15)

Wikipedia: Gloomy Sunday, also known as the"Hungarian Suicide Song", is a song composed by Hungarian pianist and composer Rezso Seress and published in 1933. The original lyrics were titled Vége a világnak (The world is ending) and were about despair caused by war, ending in a quiet prayer about people's sins. Poet László Jávor wrote his own lyrics to the song, titled Szomorú vasárnap (Sad Sunday), in which the protagonist wants to commit suicide following his lover's death. The latter lyrics ended up becoming more popular while the former were essentially forgotten. The song was first recorded in Hungarian by Pál Kalmár in 1935.



96. Duke Ellington and His Kentucky Club Orchestra - East St. Louis Toodle-oo

Year of release: 1927
Points: 91.81
Voters: 3
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 157 (3933 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: Charlie Driggs(7)

Wikipedia: This song was the first charting single for Duke Ellington in 1927 and was one of the main examples of his early "jungle music".



95. Vera Lynn - We'll Meet Again

Year of release: 1939
Points: 94.93
Voters: 3
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: Bubbling
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: andyd1010(6)

Wikipedia: The song is one of the most famous songs of the Second World War era, and resonated with soldiers going off to fight and their families and sweethearts.



94. Blind Willie Johnson - Praise God I'm Satisfied

Year of release: 1930
Points: 95.61
Voters: 2
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: Unranked
2010 poll top 100 position: 46 (Change -48)
Biggest fans: Charlie Driggs(3)

Wikipedia: "Praise God I'm Satisfied" is a traditional gospel blues song recorded in 1929 by Blind Willie Johnson (vocals and guitar) and Willie B. Harris (vocals), who is thought to have been his first wife.



93. Antonio Machín - Angelitos negros

Year of release: 1947
Points: 98.61
Voters: 2
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: Unranked
2010 poll top 100 position: 52 (Change -41)
Biggest fans: Miguel(4)

Wikipedia: 'Paint me black angels' is a famous poem by Venezuelan poet Andres Eloy Blanco. This poem could very well be regarded as a hymn against racial discrimination. The poem became well known throughout the Spanish speaking world via a bolero by actor and composer Mexican Manuel Alvarez Rentería, initially played by Mexican actor and singer Pedro Infante and also by Antonio Machin.



92. Edward Elgar - Pomp and Circumstance March No. 1 in D major

Year of release: 1901
Points: 100.93
Voters: 2
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: Unranked
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: Dan(11), Dexter(12)

Wikipedia: The Trio contains the tune known as "Land of Hope and Glory". In 1902 the tune was re-used, in modified form, for the Land of hope and glory section of his Coronation Ode for King Edward VII. The words were further modified to fit the original tune, and the result has since become a fixture at the Last Night of the Proms, and an English sporting anthem. In the United States, the Trio section "Land of Hope and Glory" of March No. 1 is often known simply as "Pomp and Circumstance" or as "The Graduation March" and is played as the processional tune at virtually all high school and some college graduation ceremonies. It was first played at such a ceremony on 28 June 1905, at Yale University, where the Professor of Music Samuel Sanford had invited his friend Elgar to attend commencement and receive an honorary doctorate of music. Elgar accepted, and Sanford made certain he was the star of the proceedings, engaging the New Haven Symphony Orchestra, the College Choir, the Glee Club, the music faculty members, and New York musicians to perform two parts from Elgar's oratorio The Light of Life and, as the graduates and officials marched out, "Pomp and Circumstance" March No. 1. Elgar repaid the compliment by dedicating his Introduction and Allegro to Sanford later that year. The tune soon became de rigueur at American graduations, used primarily as a processional at the opening of the ceremony.



91. Alfred Apaka & His Hawaiians - Na Moku Eha

Year of release: 1947
Points: 101.4
Voters: 3
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: Unranked
2010 poll top 100 position: 99 (Change +8)
Biggest fans: Charlie Driggs(8)

From the liner notes of "The Best of Alfred Apaka": Alfred Aloha Apaka (1919–1960) was one of the influential performers in the history of Hawaii's popular music. Although he recorded for less than a decade, Apaka set the standards for modern Hawaiian music with his joyful, baritone vocals and highly entertaining performances. In his book, Hawaiian Music and Musicians, George Kanahele wrote that Apaka was "the possessor of one of the most remarkable voices to come out of Hawaii. A natural, untrained, voice, it was strong, masculine and agile.....a delicate instrument that could range from B flat to E in pianissimo." Apaka inherited his musical skills from his great aunt, Lydia Ahola, the [hanai] daughter of Queen Lilioukalani. In an interview with The Honolulu Sun Bulletin, Apaka's son, Jeff, who also became an entertainer, said, "I like to think that Dad's musical training came in a direct line from the queen." During the 1940s, Apaka performed with several orchestras including Don McDiamond's Royal Hawaiian Hotel house band and Ray Kenney's band in New York. Overheard by Bob Hope while singing at a luau in Honolulu, Apaka became a regular guest on Hope's radio and television shows. Although many predicted that he would become a successful mainstream vocalist, Apaka took a different route when he convinced multimillionaire Henry Kaiser to build a hotel, The Hawaiian Village, that included a showroom where he starred in his own extravagant revue. Apaka's energetic performances soon made the hotel an essential tourist attraction, and his popularity continued to grow. Plans for a nationally broadcast television special were finalized in February 1960. A few days later, however, Apaka suffered a fatal heart attack while playing hand ball.
Last edited by DaveC on Thu Dec 08, 2016 12:52 am, edited 3 times in total.

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Re: AMF 1900-1949 Song Poll Results

Postby DaveC » Wed Dec 07, 2016 8:31 pm

As JamieW said this poll presents many uncommon challenges, so if you see anything that doesn't look correct to you please post your concerns asap.

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Re: AMF 1900-1949 Song Poll Results

Postby DaveC » Thu Dec 08, 2016 6:15 pm

90. Skip James - Devil Got My Woman

Year of release: 1931
Points: 103.62
Voters: 4
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 59 (1842 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: Mindrocker(19), jamieW(18)

Review by ricodetroit on RYM: “Devil Got My Woman” is one of James’ best recordings, and was the inspiration for Robert Johnson’s “Hell Hound On My Trail.” James plays the song very slowly in an ominous, open D-minor tuning, and his eerie, high pitched voice cuts to the listener’s soul with every line. The opening lines set the tone: “I’d rather be the devil to be that woman’s man / nothing but the devil change my baby’s mind.” James continues the song in that mournful, wailing tone until revealing the source of his despair at the end: “Woman I love, took her from my best friend / but he got lucky, stole her back again.”



89. The Mills Brothers - Paper Doll

Year of release: 1942
Points: 104.54
Voters: 3
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 160 (4041 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: Listyguy(13), andyd1010(12)

Wikipedia: "Paper Doll" was a hit song for the Mills Brothers. In the United States it held the number-one position on the Billboard singles chart for twelve weeks, from November 6, 1943, to January 22, 1944. The success of the song represented something of a revival for the group, after a few years of declining sales. It is one of the fewer than forty all-time singles to have sold 10 million (or more) physical copies worldwide.



88. The Carter Family - Can The Circle Be Unbroken (Bye and Bye)

Year of release: 1935
Points: 106.58
Voters: 6
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 37 (1388 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: Listyguy(35)

Songfacts: This song is based on a gospel hymn published in 1908 with words by Ada Habershon and music by Charles Gabriel - both very prolific writers of church music. This hymn was reworked by the Carter Family and released in 1935. Part country song, part spiritual, it describes a funeral. We see the hearse come to take the singer's mother away, and the slow procession to the grave site. Returning home, he feels a profound loss as he grieves with his siblings. Comfort comes from knowing she is with the Lord.



87. Fred Astaire - Cheek To Cheek
(combined with the version by The Boswell Sisters)

Year of release: 1935
Points: 107.89
Voters: 4
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 105 (2831 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: Dan(17)

Songfacts: This song was written by Irving Berlin and was featured in the Astaire-Rogers movie Top Hat. Many popular television shows and movies have featured this song. TV shows include I Love Lucy, M*A*S*H, The Simpsons, Family Guy and Glee; among the movies where you can hear "Cheek To Cheek": The Purple Rose of Cairo (1985), The English Patient (1996), The Green Mile (1999), Any Given Sunday (1999), A.I. Artificial Intelligence (2001).



86. Hank Williams and His Drifting Cowboys - Lovesick Blues

Year of release: 1949
Points: 108.33
Voters: 4
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 32 (1251 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 54 (Change -32)
Biggest fans: Miguel(15)

Wikipedia: Lovesick Blues is a show tune written by Cliff Friend and Irving Mills. The song first appeared in the 1922 musical Oh, Ernest. It was recorded by Emmett Miller in 1928 and later by country music singer Rex Griffin. The recordings by Griffin and Miller inspired Hank Williams to perform the song during his first appearances on the Louisiana Hayride in 1948. Receiving an enthusiastic reception from the audience, Williams decided to record his own version despite initial push back from his producer Fred Rose and his band. MGM Records released "Lovesick Blues" in February 1949, and it became an overnight success.



85. Concha Piquer - Tatuaje

Year of release: 1941
Points: 109.1
Voters: 2
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: Unranked
2010 poll top 100 position: 39 (Change -46)
Biggest fans: Miguel(1)

Wikipedia: "Tattoo" is a Spanish song composed in 1941 by Xandro Valerio, Rafael de Leon, and Manuel Quiroga. It was popularized by Concha Piquer (1906-1990), becoming one of the most famous of her repertoire. It has the peculiarity that it combines verses with the rhythm of waltz with others that have the rhythm of tango.



84. Vaughn Monroe - (Ghost) Riders in the Sky (A Cowboy Legend)
(combined with the version by Peggy Lee)

Year of release: 1949
Points: 109.61
Voters: 5
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 123 (3237 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: jamieW(5)

Wikipedia: The song tells a folk tale of a cowboy who has a vision of red-eyed, steel-hooved cattle thundering across the sky, being chased by the spirits of damned cowboys. One warns him that if he does not change his ways, he will be doomed to join them, forever "trying to catch the Devil's herd across these endless skies". Stan Jones (songwriter) stated he had been told the story when he was 12 years old by an old cowboy friend. A number of versions were crossover hits on the pop charts in 1949.



83. Kurt Weill - Speak Low

Year of release: 1943
Points: 109.97
Voters: 2
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: Unranked
2010 poll top 100 position: 36 (Change -47)
Biggest fans: Charlie Driggs(1)

Wikipedia: Composed by Kurt Weill, with lyrics by Ogden Nash. The opening line "Speak low when you speak, love" is a play of words on a line in William Shakespeare's comedy Much Ado About Nothing (1600), in which Don Pedro says "Speak low if you speak love."



82. Kate Smith - God Bless America

Year of release: 1939
Points: 110.76
Voters: 3
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 83 (2395 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 40 (Change -42)
Biggest fans: Bruno(14), Brad(9)

Wikipedia: "God Bless America" is an American patriotic song written by Irving Berlin in 1918 and revised by him in 1938. The later version has notably been recorded by Kate Smith, becoming her signature song. "God Bless America" takes the form of a prayer (intro lyrics "as we raise our voices, in a solemn prayer") for God's blessing and peace for the nation ("...stand beside her and guide her through the night...").

Irving Berlin: I’d like to write a great peace song, but it’s hard to do, because you have trouble dramatizing peace.



81. Ella Fitzgerald - How High the Moon
(combined with the version by Django Reinhardt)

Year of release: 1947
Points: 111.79
Voters: 2
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: Unranked
2010 poll top 100 position: 48 (Change -33)
Biggest fans: bonnielaurel(3)

Wikipedia: The earliest recorded hit version was by Benny Goodman & His Orchestra. It was recorded on February 7, 1940. The song was sung in various recordings by Ella Fitzgerald, becoming (with the Gershwin's "Oh, Lady Be Good!") Ella's signature tune. She first performed the song at Carnegie Hall on September 29, 1947. Her first recording, backed by the Daydreamers, was recorded December 20, 1947.

DaveC: The version by Les Paul & Mary Ford ranked #55 in our 1950s song poll.

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Re: AMF 1900-1949 Song Poll Results

Postby DaveC » Fri Dec 09, 2016 4:59 am

80. Jimmie Rodgers - Blue Yodel #1 (T For Texas)

Year of release: 1928
Points: 112.11
Voters: 7
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 11 (717 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: Bruno(15)

Thomas Ward for AllMusic: “T For Texas” is one of Jimmie Rodgers’ best-known songs, and it’s been covered by numerous artists. Indeed, it’s also one of Rodgers’ best songs, and it’s achievement is founded on Rodgers’ vocal, which rises and falls with carefree abandon. As with most of his best songs, “T For Texas” is full of humour, and the third verse contains the fantastic “Lord I’m going where the water drinks like cherry wine/’Cause the Georgia water tastes of turpentine”. The song is a mocking ode to Rodgers’ home state, and it’s certainly one of the artist’s most impassioned vocals, even his yodelling sounds positively possessed.

Wikipedia: The original 78 issue of "Blue Yodel No. 1 ("T" for Texas)" sold more than a half million copies, a phenomenal number at the time.



79. Giacomo Puccini - Nessun dorma from Turandot

Year of release: 1926
Points: 112.27
Voters: 4
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: Unranked
2010 poll top 100 position: 88 (Change +9)
Biggest fans: Dan(7)

Wikipedia: "Nessun dorma" (English: "None shall sleep") is an aria from the final act of Giacomo Puccini's frequently performed opera Turandot and is one of the best-known tenor arias in all opera. It is sung by Calaf, il principe ignoto (the unknown prince), who falls in love at first sight with the beautiful but cold Princess Turandot. However, any man who wishes to wed Turandot must first answer her three riddles; if he fails, he will be beheaded. In the aria, Calaf expresses his triumphant assurance that he will win the princess.



78. Louis Jordan and His Tympany Five - Caldonia

Year of release: 1945
Points: 113.13
Voters: 6
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 33 (1252 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: Charlie Driggs(29)

Wikipedia: "Caldonia" is a jump blues song, first recorded in 1945 by Louis Jordan and his Tympany Five. A version by Erskine Hawkins, also in 1945, was described by Billboard magazine as "rock and roll", the first time that phrase was used in print to describe any style of music.



77. Carlos Gardel - Volver

Year of release: 1935
Points: 114.57
Voters: 5
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 163 (4136 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 74 (Change -3)
Biggest fans: Miguel(10)

Wikipedia: Carlos Gardel was a French Argentine singer, songwriter, composer and actor, and the most prominent figure in the history of tango. Gardel's baritone voice and the dramatic phrasing of his lyrics made miniature masterpieces of his hundreds of three-minute tango recordings. Together with lyricist and long-time collaborator Alfredo Le Pera, Gardel wrote several classic tangos.



76. The Andrews Sisters - Bei mir bist du schön
(combined with the version by Léo Marjane - 1938)

Year of release: 1937
Points: 115.13
Voters: 3
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 103 (2804 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: bonnielaurel(19), jamieW(6)

Songfacts: This is a Yiddish song originally composed by Jacob Jacobs (lyricist) and Sholom Secunda (composer) for a Yiddish musical, I Would if I Could, in 1932. Secunda then sold the rights to his song for $30. Sammy Cahn heard the song and wrote English lyrics in 1937 for the Andrew Sisters and it became a big hit.



75. Robert Johnson - Sweet Home Chicago

Year of release: 1937
Points: 115.48
Voters: 4
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 67 (2048 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 49 (Change -26)
Biggest fans: Listyguy(2)

Wikipedia: Sweet Home Chicago" is a blues standard first recorded by Robert Johnson in 1936. Although he is often credited as the songwriter, several songs have been identified as precedents. The song has become a popular anthem for the city of Chicago despite ambiguity in Johnson's original lyrics.



74. Geeshie Wiley - Last Kind Words Blues

Year of release: 1930
Points: 116.11
Voters: 3
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: Unranked
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: DaveC(12), jamieW(14)

Wikipedia: Geeshie Wiley was an American country blues singer and guitar player who may have been born Lillie Mae Scott. She recorded six songs for Paramount Records, issued on three records in 1930 and 1931. According to blues historian Don Kent, Wiley "may well have been the rural South's greatest female blues singer and musician", but little is known of her life, and there are no known photographs of her.



73. Carlos Gardel - El día que me quieras

Year of release: 1935
Points: 116.43
Voters: 2
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 170 (4482 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 65 (Change -8)
Biggest fans: Miguel(3)

Wikipedia: El día que me quieras (English: The day that you love me) is a tango with music by Carlos Gardel and lyrics by Alfredo Le Pera. Originally featured in the 1935 film of the same name, it became a heavily recorded tango standard, even by artists outside of the realm of tango.



72. Count Basie and His Orchestra - One O'Clock Jump

Year of release: 1937
Points: 117.63
Voters: 4
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 26 (1064 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: Henry(11)

Bruce Eder for AllMusic: If there was a single number that big band musicians and fans alike considered virtually an anthem for the swing era, it was "One O'Clock Jump" by Count Basie & His Orchestra. The composition, usually done as an instrumental, embodied everything that was striking about the big jazz-based orchestras that called the tune in popular music in the second half of the 1930s.



71. Joaquin Rodrigo - Concierto de Aranjuez: II. Adagio

Year of release: 1940
Points: 119.62
Voters: 6
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: Unranked
2010 poll top 100 position: 63 (Change -8)
Biggest fans: jamieW(17)

Wikipedia: The Concierto de Aranjuez was inspired by the gardens at Palacio Real de Aranjuez, the spring resort palace and gardens built by Philip II in the last half of the 16th century and rebuilt in the middle of the 18th century by Ferdinand VI. The work attempts to transport the listener to another place and time through the evocation of the sounds of nature. According to the composer, the second movement "represents a dialogue between guitar and solo instruments (cor anglais, bassoon, oboe, horn etc.)". He described the concerto itself as capturing "the fragrance of magnolias, the singing of birds, and the gushing of fountains" in the gardens of Aranjuez. Rodrigo and his wife Victoria stayed silent for many years about the inspiration for the second movement, and thus the popular belief grew that it was inspired by the bombing of Guernica in 1937. In her autobiography, Victoria eventually declared that it was both an evocation of the happy days of their honeymoon and a response to Rodrigo's devastation at the miscarriage of their first pregnancy.

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Re: AMF 1900-1949 Song Poll Results

Postby DaveC » Fri Dec 09, 2016 7:09 pm

70. Duke Ellington & His Cotton Club Orchestra - Mood Indigo

Year of release: 1930
Points: 127.72
Voters: 5
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 27 (1066 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: Dexter(17)

Wikipedia: The tune was composed for a radio broadcast in October 1930 and was originally titled "Dreamy Blues." It was "the first tune I ever wrote specially for microphone transmission," Ellington recalled. "The next day wads of mail came in raving about the new tune, so Irving Mills put a lyric to it." Renamed "Mood Indigo," it became a jazz standard.



69. Robert Johnson - I Believe I'll Dust My Broom
Image
Year of release: 1937
Points: 127.92
Voters: 4
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: Unranked
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: DaveC(16), Listyguy(8)

Wikipedia: "Dust My Broom" is a blues song originally recorded as "I Believe I'll Dust My Broom" by American blues artist Robert Johnson in 1936. It is a solo performance in the Delta blues-style with Johnson's vocal accompanied by his acoustic guitar. As with many of his songs, it is based on earlier blues songs, the earliest of which has been identified as "I Believe I'll Make a Change", recorded by the Sparks brothers as "Pinetop and Lindberg" in 1932. Johnson's guitar work features an early use of a boogie rhythm pattern, which is seen as a major innovation, as well as a repeating triplets figure. "I Believe I'll Dust My Broom" was issued before blues records were tracked by recording industry trade publications and, as with most of Johnson's recordings, has not been otherwise identified as a big seller at the time.

DaveC: Elmore James's version (#28 in our 1950s poll) elevated to song into a blues standard.



68. Hank Williams and His Drifting Cowboys - Lost Highway

Year of release: 1949
Points: 129.29
Voters: 5
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 96 (2682 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 32 (Change -36)
Biggest fans: Miguel(19), Mindrocker(17)

Wikipedia: "Lost Highway" is a country music song written and recorded by blind country singer-songwriter Leon Payne in 1948. It was released in October 1948 on Nashville-based Bullet label.

Wikipedia: As Williams' biographer Colin Escott observes, "In recent years, 'Lost Highway' has been the title of several books, a stage show, a record label, and a television series. It's seen as one of Hank's defining records, if not a defining moment in country music, which makes it ironic that it barely dented the charts on release and doubly ironic that it's not even one of Hank's songs." Although he did not write the song, "Lost Highway" was a natural for Williams, the song's combination of perdition and misogyny sounding "like pages torn from his diary."



67. Duke Ellington Featuring Ivie Anderson - It Don't Mean a Thing (If It Ain't Got That Swing)

Year of release: 1932
Points: 132.11
Voters: 5
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 153 (3810 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 81 (Change +14)
Biggest fans: Romain(17), Brad(17)

Wikipedia: Probably the first song to use the word "swing" in the title, it introduced the term into everyday language and presaged the swing era by three years.



66. Igor Stravinsky - Le sacre du printemps: II. Le Sacrifice (The Rite of Spring: The Sacrifice)

Year of release: 1913
Points: 132.86
Voters: 3
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: Unranked
2010 poll top 100 position: 23 (Change -43)
Biggest fans: sonofsamiam(2)

Good Music Guide: Part II: The Sacrifice. The young women are standing on the stage near a fire, one of them will be chosen as a sacrifice to the earth. The chosen one stands alone and still in the middle of the stage after a mystic dance, and the young members of the tribe gather around her and dance in a "crescendo or brutal excitement." Finally the chosen one joins them and the dancing grows more and more violent until it climaxes and the chosen maiden falls exhausted and dies. The men then carry her over to the sacred stone and fall prostrate. The rite is over.



65. Les Brown & His Orchestra with Doris Day - Sentimental Journey

Year of release: 1944
Points: 132.93
Voters: 5
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 49 (1596 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: bonnielaurel(11)

Wikipedia: Les Brown and His Band of Renown had been performing the song, but were unable to record it because of the 1942–44 musicians' strike. When the strike ended, the band, with Doris Day as vocalist, had a hit record with the song, Day's first #1 hit, in 1945.



64. Erik Satie - Je te veux

Year of release: 1903
Points: 134.52
Voters: 4
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: Unranked
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: Dan(19), Romain(16)

Wikipedia: "Je te veux" ("I want you") is a song composed by Erik Satie to a text by Henry Pacory. A sentimental waltz with erotic lyrics, it was written for Paulette Darty, whose accompanist Satie had been for a period of time. Satie composed various versions of the "Je te veux" waltz: for piano and voice, for an orchestra of brass instruments, and for full orchestra (including a trio). The piano and voice version was first published in 1903. The composer later arranged the work for solo piano, adding a middle section between the second chorus and the second verse.



63. The Andrews Sisters - Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy

Year of release: 1941
Points: 135.28
Voters: 5
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 135 (3510 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: bonnielaurel(5)

Wikipedia: "Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy" was a major hit for The Andrews Sisters and an iconic World War II tune. The song was written by Don Raye and Hughie Prince, and was recorded at Decca's Hollywood studios on January 2, 1941, nearly a year before the United States entered World War II but after the start of a peacetime draft to expand the armed forces in anticipation of American involvement.



62. Hot Lips Page - I Won't Be Here Long

Year of release: 1940
Points: 135.41
Voters: 3
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: Unranked
2010 poll top 100 position: 30 (Change -32)
Biggest fans: Mindrocker(2)

Wikipedia: [Hot Lips Page] was one of the most flexible of trumpeters, demonstrating a broad tone and a wide range on the instrument. He has been largely neglected by historians since his death due to mysterious circumstances, but is considered by many to be one of the giants of the Swing Era and one of the founders of what came to be known as rhythm and blues.



61. Charlie Parker - Ko Ko

Year of release: 1946
Points: 137.03
Voters: 7
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 17 (892 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 51 (Change -10)
Biggest fans: Henry(26)

Wikipedia: "Ko-Ko" is a 1945 bebop recording composed by Charlie Parker. The original recorded version features Parker on alto saxophone with trumpeter Miles Davis, double bassist Curley Russell and drummer Max Roach. Due to the absence of Bud Powell (who was helping his mother buy a house), Dizzy Gillespie was enlisted to play piano, instead of his usual trumpet.

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Re: AMF 1900-1949 Song Poll Results

Postby Bruno » Fri Dec 09, 2016 8:41 pm

Thanks, DaveC!
The list is great so far.

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Re: AMF 1900-1949 Song Poll Results

Postby DaveC » Sat Dec 10, 2016 6:17 pm

60. Édith Piaf - L'accordéoniste

Year of release: 1940
Points: 138.12
Voters: 6
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: Unranked
2010 poll top 100 position: 79 (Change +19)
Biggest fans: Dan(18), nicolas(19)

DaveC: Initially titled "La Fille de Joie Est Triste" (The prostitute is sad) this song is about a prostitute who's partner - an accordionist - is killed in the war. Thereafter she cannot bear to hear accordion music.



59. Fats Waller - Ain't Misbehavin'

Year of release: 1929
Points: 140.98
Voters: 8
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 28 (1078 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: Dexter(29)

Wikipedia: Fats Waller claimed the song was written while "lodging" in alimony prison, and that is why he was not "misbehaving".



58. Yves Montand - Les feuilles mortes

Year of release: 1946
Points: 143.02
Voters: 6
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 52 (1682 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: Romain(2)

Lyric: You used to love me and I used to love you, and we used to live together, you loving me, me loving you. But life separates lovers, pretty slowly, noiselessly, and the sea erases on the sand the separated lovers' footprints.



57. Aaron Copland - Fanfare For the Common Man

Year of release: 1943
Points: 145.52
Voters: 5
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: Bubbling
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: Henry(5)

Wikipedia: was inspired in part by a famous speech made earlier in 1942 where vice president Henry A. Wallace proclaimed the dawning of the "Century of the Common Man".



56. Sergei Rachmaninoff - Concerto for Piano no. 2 in C minor, Op. 18: 2nd movement, Adagio sostenuto
Image
Year of release: 1901
Points: 147.01
Voters: 2
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: Unranked
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: Dan(13), Dexter(1)

Wikipedia: The Adagio sostenuto theme appears in Eric Carmen's 1975 ballad "All by Myself". Carmen first composed the song's interlude, then took the bridge from Rachmaninoff and the chorus from his own "Let's Pretend". Carmen explained that Rachmaninoff was his "favorite music".



55. Trio Matamoros - Lágrimas negras

Year of release: 1932
Points: 150.65
Voters: 4
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: Unranked
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: DaveC(3)

Wikipedia: Miguel Matamoros was one of the greatest and most prolific composers of Cuban son. His first hit was "El que siembra su maíz" (He who sows his corn), followed by classics such as "Lágrimas negras" (Black tears) and "Son de la loma" (They are from the hill). The group, whose members stayed together for nearly 45 years, disbanded in 1969.



54. Igor Stravinsky - Le sacre du printemps: I. L'adoration de la terre (The Rite of Spring: Adoration of the Earth)

Year of release: 1913
Points: 152.68
Voters: 4
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: Unranked
2010 poll top 100 position: 57 (Change +3)
Biggest fans: sonofsamiam(6)

Igor Stravinsky: I was guided by no system whatever in Le Sacre du Printemps, I had only my ear to help me; I heard and I wrote what I heard. I am the vessel through which Le Sacre passed.



53. Hoagy Carmichael - Stardust
(combined with the version by Louis Armstrong & the version by Artie Shaw)

Year of release: 1928
Points: 156.11
Voters: 6
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 75 (2206 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: Henry(13), andyd1010(7)

Wikipedia: "Stardust" is an American popular song composed in 1927 by Hoagy Carmichael with lyrics added in 1929 by Mitchell Parish. Carmichael first recorded the song, originally titled "Star Dust", at the Gennett Records studio in Richmond, Indiana. The song, "a song about a song about love", played in an idiosyncratic melody in medium tempo, became an American standard, and is one of the most recorded songs of the 20th century, with over 1,500 total recordings.



52. Mississippi John Hurt - Stack O' Lee Blues
(combined with the version by Long "Cleve" Reed & Little Harvey Hull - 1927)

Year of release: 1929
Points: 160.47
Voters: 8
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 116 (3068 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 94 (Change +42)
Biggest fans: DaveC(18), Listyguy(7)

Wikipedia: "Stagger Lee", also known as "Stagolee" and other variants, is a popular American folk song about the murder of Billy Lyons by "Stag" Lee Shelton in St. Louis, Missouri at Christmas, 1895. The song was first published in 1911, and was first recorded in 1923 by Fred Waring's Pennsylvanians. The version by Mississippi John Hurt, recorded in 1928, is regarded as definitive. In his version, as in all such pieces, there are many (sometimes anachronistic) variants on the lyrics.



51. Billie Holiday - God Bless the Child
Image
Year of release: 1941
Points: 164.07
Voters: 5
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 19 (928 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 98 (Change +47)
Biggest fans: Bruno(9), Dexter(18)

Songfacts: This was written by Billie Holiday with her frequent collaborator Arthur Herzog in 1941. She wrote the lyrics after an argument with her mother, Sadie, over financial matters. Just a few years earlier, Holiday had loaned her mom thousands of dollars to open a restaurant and when she found herself in need of cash, Sadie declined to lend her any money. In her autobiography Lady Sings The Blues, Holiday recalled how, in the course of the row, she uttered the old proverb, "God bless the child that got his own." The singer's anger over the incident led her to turn that line into a starting point for this song.

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Re: AMF 1900-1949 Song Poll Results

Postby DaveC » Sun Dec 11, 2016 6:35 pm

50. Cab Calloway - Minnie the Moocher

Year of release: 1931
Points: 168.2
Voters: 6
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 12 (720 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 29 (Change -21)
Biggest fans: Bruno(20), Brad(13)

Wikipedia: In performances, Calloway would have the audience participate by repeating each scat phrase in a form of call and response. Eventually Calloway's phrases would become so long and complex that the audience would laugh at their own failed attempts to repeat them. The lyrics are heavily laden with drug references. The character "Smokey" is described as "cokey", meaning a user of cocaine; the phrase "kicking the gong around" was a slang reference to smoking opium.



49. Robert Johnson - Hellhound on My Trail

Year of release: 1937
Points: 168.46
Voters: 4
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 24 (1045 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 31 (Change -18)
Biggest fans: sonofsamiam(10), Listyguy(6)

Wikipedia: According to legend, Johnson sold his soul to the devil in a Faustian deal at the crossroads in return for his musical talent. This song fuels the mystery and lore surrounding him as it suggests a man in the grip of evil, and his deal with the devil has become part of popular culture.



48. Bessie Smith - St. Louis Blues
(combined with the version by Louis Armstrong & His Orchestra - 1930)

Year of release: 1925
Points: 169.4
Voters: 6
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 15 (748 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 56 (Change +8)
Biggest fans: Bruno(16), nicolas(9)

Wikipedia: "Saint Louis Blues" is a popular American song, composed by W. C. Handy in the blues style and published in September 1914. It remains a fundamental part of jazz musicians' repertoire. It was also one of the first blues songs to succeed as a pop song. It has been performed by numerous musicians in various styles, from Louis Armstrong and Bessie Smith to Count Basie, Glenn Miller, Guy Lombardo, and the Boston Pops Orchestra. It has been called "the jazzman's Hamlet". The 1925 version sung by Bessie Smith, with Louis Armstrong on cornet, was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1993. The 1929 version by Louis Armstrong & His Orchestra (with Henry "Red" Allen) was inducted in 2008.



47. Harlem Hamfats - Weed Smoker's Dream
(combined with Lil Green - Why Don't You Do Right? - 1941)

Year of release: 1936
Points: 170.24
Voters: 7
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: Unranked
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: DaveC(11), Mindrocker(16)

Wikipedia: In 1936, the Harlem Hamfats recorded "The Weed Smoker's Dream". Band member McCoy later rewrote the song, refining the composition and lyrics. The new tune, titled "Why Don't You Do Right?", was recorded by Lil Green in 1941, with guitar by William "Big Bill" Broonzy. The recording was an early jazz and blues hit. One of the best-known versions of the song was recorded by Peggy Lee and Benny Goodman on July 27, 1942, in New York. Featured in the 1943 film, Stage Door Canteen, it sold over 1 million copies and brought her to nationwide attention.



46. Le Quintette du Hot Club de France (Django Reinhardt & Stéphane Grapelli) - Limehouse Blues

Year of release: 1936
Points: 170.25
Voters: 6
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: Unranked
2010 poll top 100 position: 24 (Change -22)
Biggest fans: Listyguy(5), nicolas(7)

Wikipedia: "Limehouse Blues" is a popular 1922 British song written by the London-based duo of Douglas Furber (lyrics) and Philip Braham (music). It was made famous by Gertrude Lawrence. It has been recorded hundreds of times since, and remains in the standard jazz repertory.



45. Jimmie Rodgers - Gambling Bar Room Blues
(combined with Bob Wills - Drunkard Blues - 1939)

Year of release: 1933
Points: 176.97
Voters: 5
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: Unranked
2010 poll top 100 position: 33 (Change -12)
Biggest fans: Mindrocker(13), nicolas(5)

David Vinopal for AllMusic: His brass plaque in the Country Music Hall of Fame reads, "Jimmie Rodgers' name stands foremost in the country music field as the man who started it all." This is a fair assessment. The "Singing Brakeman" and the "Mississippi Blue Yodeler," whose six-year career was cut short by tuberculosis, became the first nationally known star of country music and the direct influence of many later performers, from Hank Snow, Ernest Tubb, and Hank Williams to Lefty Frizzell and Merle Haggard. Rodgers sang about rounders and gamblers, bounders and ramblers -- and he knew what he sang about.



44. Lena Horne - Stormy Weather
(combined with the version by Ethel Waters - 1933)

Year of release: 1942
Points: 182.21
Voters: 4
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 42 (1467 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: bonnielaurel(10), Romain(4)

Wikipedia: "Stormy Weather" is a 1933 song written by Harold Arlen and Ted Koehler. Ethel Waters first sang it at The Cotton Club night club in Harlem in 1933 and recorded it that year. The song has since been performed by artists as diverse as Frank Sinatra, Etta James, Dinah Washington, Clodagh Rodgers, and Reigning Sound and most famously by Lena Horne and Billie Holiday.



43. Mahalia Jackson - Move On Up a Little Higher

Year of release: 1948
Points: 190.22
Voters: 8
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 23 (990 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 50 (Change +7)
Biggest fans: andyd1010(17)

Wikipedia: "Move On Up A Little Higher" is a gospel song written by W. Herbert Brewster, first recorded by Brother John Sellers in late 1946, but most famously recorded on September 12, 1947, by gospel singer Mahalia Jackson, a version that sold eight million copies. The best selling gospel record of all time.



42. Jean Sibelius - Finlandia

Year of release: 1900
Points: 194.19
Voters: 3
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: Unranked
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: Dan(1), Dexter(3)

Wikipedia: Finlandia, Op. 26, is a tone poem by the Finnish composer Jean Sibelius. It was written in 1899 and revised in 1900. The piece was composed for the Press Celebrations of 1899, a covert protest against increasing censorship from the Russian Empire, and was the last of seven pieces performed as an accompaniment to a tableau depicting episodes from Finnish history. The premiere was on 2 July 1900 in Helsinki with the Helsinki Philharmonic Society conducted by Robert Kajanus.



41. Anton Karas - The "Harry Lime" Theme from The Third Man

Year of release: 1949
Points: 202.21
Voters: 8
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 182 (4835 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 20 (Change -21)
Biggest fans: Honorio(19), Miguel(8)

Wikipedia: The Third Man is a 1949 British film noir, directed by Carol Reed. One night after a long day of filming The Third Man on location in Vienna, Reed and cast members Joseph Cotten, Alida Valli and Orson Welles had dinner and retired to a wine cellar. In the bistro, which retained the atmosphere of the pre-war days, they heard the zither music of Anton Karas, a 40-year-old musician who was playing there just for the tips. Reed immediately realized that this was the music he wanted for his film. Karas spoke only German, which no one in Reed's party spoke, but fellow customers translated Reed's offer to the musician that he compose and perform the soundtrack for The Third Man. Karas was reluctant since it meant traveling to England, but he finally accepted. Karas wrote and recorded the 40 minutes of music heard in the Third Man over a six-week period, after the entire film was translated for him at Shepperton Studios.

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Re: AMF 1900-1949 Song Poll Results

Postby DaveC » Mon Dec 12, 2016 9:18 am

40. Louis Jordan and His Tympany Five - Choo Choo Ch'Boogie

Year of release: 1946
Points: 203.4
Voters: 7
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 43 (1485 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 43 (Change +3)
Biggest fans: Listyguy(15), nicolas(6)

Mark Romano for AllMusic: Louis Jordan began fronting his own band when the second World War was beginning to engulf Europe. Jordan & His Tympany Five had racked up several smash hits before January 23, 1946, when they recorded "Choo Choo Ch'Boogie." The single quickly hit the million sales plateau, an extraordinary accomplishment in those days. It was at the number one slot on the charts for 18 weeks. Jordan's distinctive shuffle beat and explosive jump blues made "Choo Choo Ch'Boogie" into a staple of the swing-era repertoire. "Choo Choo Ch'Boogie" is a prime example of Jordan's penchant for striking at the heart of good times with jumpin' blues, hot riffing jazz, and slang that became part of the rock & roll lexicon.



39. Artie Shaw and His Orchestra - Nightmare

Year of release: 1938
Points: 205.03
Voters: 5
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: Unranked
2010 poll top 100 position: 42 (Change +3)
Biggest fans: Romain(10), Mindrocker(5), jamieW(9)

Wikipedia: Artie Shaw composed his "Theme" song, the haunting, morose "Nightmare," with its Hasidic nuances, rather than use a more "accessible" song. It was as if Shaw was saying in musical terms that he and his band weren't inviting anyone to dance a la Goodman's "Let's Dance" nor were they getting sentimental over anything, a la Tommy Dorsey's "I'm Gettin' Sentimental Over You." Whatever it was or whether or not there was any deeper meaning to it, Nightmare was a profoundly unique choice for a theme song especially in the face of what virtually every other swing band leader was doing. Yet, perhaps, it illustrated the deeper search for the meaning of anything in the mind of its intellectually-driven composer. In a televised interview in the 1970s, Shaw derided the often "asinine" songs created in the song mills of Tin Pan Alley that were the lifeblood of popular music of the period and which bands, especially the most popular (i.e., his own), were compelled to play night after night. In 1994, he told Frank Prial (The New York Times), "I thought that because I was Artie Shaw I could do what I wanted, but all they wanted was 'Begin the Beguine.' "



38. Django Reinhardt/Le Quintette du Hot Club de France - Nuages

Year of release: 1940
Points: 206.73
Voters: 7
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 36 (1370 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 34 (Change -4)
Biggest fans: Honorio(4)

Honorio: 1985, Place de Montmartre, Paris, a twenty-year old Honorio with a group of friends from the University on a summer trip. While my friends were being portraited by street painters I ventured into a dark Café when two guitar players played Jazz. I asked them to play "Nuages" and they quickly attacked it in a quite routinary but impeccable manner (probably they played it before a thousand times). "Nuages" is the sound of Paris to me.



37. Charles Trenet - La mer

Year of release: 1946
Points: 207.92
Voters: 8
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 69 (2067 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 53 (Change +16)
Biggest fans: bonnielaurel(17), Romain(7)

Wikipedia: Trenet says that he wrote a first version of the song's lyrics as poem at the age of 16, many years before he came up with a tune for it. The tune came to him while traveling by train in 1943 between Montpellier and Perpignan as he was gazing out of the window at the Étang de Thau, a lagoon in the south of France. By the time of Trenet's death in 2001 there were supposedly more than 4000 different recordings of it with over 70 million copies sold in total.



36. Lester Flatt & Earl Scruggs - Foggy Mountain Breakdown

Year of release: 1949
Points: 210.26
Voters: 10
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 61 (1856 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY (58 in our 2010 1950s poll)
Biggest fans: Dan(5)

nicolas: Earl Scruggs was from outer space. Listen to his banjo playing, to his incredibly fast hands, and you'll be convinced of that. But after some researching I just found out that he was not from another planet but from Flint Hill, NC.



35. Bill Monroe & His Blue Grass Boys - Blue Moon of Kentucky

Year of release: 1947
Points: 210.42
Voters: 7
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 18 (927 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 60 (Change +25)
Biggest fans: andyd1010(5), Bruno(18), nicolas(16)

Wikipedia: Bill Monroe wrote the song in 1946, recording it for Columbia Records on September 16. It was released in early 1947. At the time, the Bluegrass Boys included vocalist and guitarist Lester Flatt and banjoist Earl Scruggs, who would later form their own bluegrass band, the Foggy Mountain Boys. Both Flatt and Scruggs performed on the recording, although Bill Monroe supplied the vocals on this song.



34. Thelonious Monk Quintet - Round About Midnight

Year of release: 1948
Points: 218.32
Voters: 9
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 6 (426 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 15 (Change -19)
Biggest fans: Honorio(17), Bruno(10)

Wikipedia: "'Round Midnight" (sometimes "'Round About Midnight") is a 1944 jazz standard by pianist Thelonious Monk. A version recorded by Monk's quintet was added to the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1993. It is the most recorded jazz standard composed by a jazz musician.

Steve Leggett for AllMusic: There is really no one quite like Thelonious Monk in the whole history of jazz music. His compositional style, much like his odd, fractured and angular piano playing, was deceptively simple and repetitive, full of endlessly circular progressions that seemed to almost intersect themselves at whim, ending up more like auditory puzzle boxes than anything resembling a jazz standard.



33. Samuel Barber - Adagio for Strings

Year of release: 1938
Points: 219.56
Voters: 6
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: Unranked
2010 poll top 100 position: 35 (Change +2)
Biggest fans: Dan(15), Dexter(2), jamieW(12)

Wikipedia: In January 1938 Barber sent an orchestrated version of the Adagio for Strings to Arturo Toscanini. The conductor returned the score without comment, which annoyed Barber. Toscanini then sent word that he was planning to perform the piece and had returned it simply because he had already memorized it. It was reported that Toscanini did not look at the music again until the day before the premiere. On November 5, 1938, a selected audience was invited to Studio 8H in Rockefeller Center to watch Toscanini conduct the first performance, a radio broadcast which was recorded for posterity. In 2004, listeners of the BBC's Today program voted Adagio for Strings the "saddest classical" work ever, ahead of "Dido's Lament" from Dido and Aeneas by Henry Purcell, the Adagietto from Gustav Mahler's 5th symphony, Metamorphosen by Richard Strauss, and Gloomy Sunday as sung by Billie Holiday.



32. Carl Orff - Carmina Burana: Fortuna Imperatrix Mundi - O Fortuna

Year of release: 1937
Points: 228.28
Voters: 7
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: Unranked
2010 poll top 100 position: 45 (Change +13)
Biggest fans: Dan(8), Dexter(4), jamieW(11)

Wikipedia: Shortly after the greatly successful premiere, Orff said the following to his publisher, Schott Music "Everything I have written to date, and which you have, unfortunately, printed, can be destroyed. With Carmina Burana, my collected works begin."



31. Coleman Hawkins and His Orchestra - Body and Soul
(combined with the version by Frank Sinatra - 1949)

Year of release: 1939
Points: 231.95
Voters: 7
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 10 (673 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 28 (Change -3)
Biggest fans: Dexter(15), Brad(7), nicolas(14)

Wikipedia: To this day, "Body and Soul" is the most recorded jazz standard, with hundreds of versions performed and recorded by dozens of artists. One of the most famous and influential takes was recorded by Coleman Hawkins and His Orchestra on October 11, 1939. The recording is unusual in that the song's melody is only hinted at in the recording; Hawkins' two-choruses of improvisation over the tune's chord progression constitute almost the entire take. Because of this, as well as the imaginative use of harmony and break from traditional swing cliches, the recording is recognised as part of the "early tremors of bebop".

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Re: AMF 1900-1949 Song Poll Results

Postby DaveC » Mon Dec 12, 2016 7:46 pm

30. Leadbelly - Goodnight Irene

Year of release: 1943
Points: 238.73
Voters: 9
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 63 (1948 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 10 (Change -20)
Biggest fans: Honorio(12), nicolas(1)

Wikipedia: The specific origins of "Irene" are unclear. Lead Belly was singing a version of the song from as early as 1908, which he claimed to have learned from his uncles Terell and Bob. An 1892 song by Gussie L. Davis has several lyrical and structural similarities to the latter song. Some evidence suggests the 1892 song was itself based on an even earlier song which has not survived. Regardless of where he first heard it, by the 1930s Lead Belly had made the song his own, modifying the rhythm and rewriting most of the verses. "Irene" remained a staple of Lead Belly's performances throughout the 1930s and '40s. However, despite popularity within the New York blues community, the song was never commercially successful during his lifetime.



29. Woody Guthrie - This Land Is Your Land

Year of release: 1947
Points: 239.38
Voters: 8
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 3 (316 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 11 (Change -18)
Biggest fans: Listyguy(16), Honorio(13), Bruno(6)

Songfacts: Originally titled "God Blessed America," Guthrie wrote this as a parody of Irving Berlin's "God Bless America." When Guthrie started wrote the song in 1940, the last line in the chorus was "God blessed America for me," which Guthrie eventually changed into "This land was made for you and me." It evolved into a protest anthem as generations of folk singers performed the song, but it is often misinterpreted as a patriotic song. The lyrics express Guthrie's belief that the working class should have the same rights as the rich.



28. Hank Williams and His Drifting Cowboys - Move It On Over

Year of release: 1947
Points: 239.42
Voters: 6
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 39 (1398 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 17 (Change -11)
Biggest fans: Dan(12), Miguel(5), nicolas(12)

Wikipedia: "Move It On Over" is a 12-bar blues song written and recorded by the American country music singer-songwriter Hank Williams in 1947. The song was Williams' first major country hit, reaching #4 on the Billboard Country Singles chart.



27. Quinette du Hot Club de France/ Django Reinhardt & Stéphane Grappelli - Minor Swing

Year of release: 1937
Points: 242.63
Voters: 6
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: Unranked
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: DaveC(14), bonnielaurel(6), Romain(3)

Wikipedia: "Minor Swing" is a popular Gypsy jazz tune composed by Django Reinhardt and Stéphane Grappelli. It was first recorded by The Quintet of the Hot Club of France in 1937. It was recorded five other times throughout Reinhardt's career and is considered to be one of his signature compositions, as well as a Gypsy jazz standard.



26. Blind Willie Johnson - Dark Was the Night, Cold Was the Ground

Year of release: 1928
Points: 247.34
Voters: 8
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 20 (940 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 16 (Change -10)
Biggest fans: sonofsamiam(4), Listyguy(19), Honorio(14)

Wikipedia: Born in 1897, Johnson taught himself how to play guitar and dedicated his life to blues and gospel music, playing for people on street corners and in mission halls. Columbia Records had a field unit that traveled to smaller towns to record local talent. Johnson recorded 30 songs for them at five sessions between 1927 and 1930. Among the first of these was "Dark Was the Night, Cold Was the Ground".



25. Duke Ellington and His Orchestra - The Mooche

Year of release: 1928
Points: 247.67
Voters: 6
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: Unranked
2010 poll top 100 position: 7 (Change -18)
Biggest fans: Mindrocker(1), Brad(2)

Wikipedia: "The Mooche" is an American jazz song, composed in 1928 by Duke Ellington and Irving Mills. The song is in the so-called "jungle style" and includes the clarinet and muted trumpet typical of Ellington's work.



24. Maurice Ravel - Boléro

Year of release: 1928
Points: 252.51
Voters: 8
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: Unranked
2010 poll top 100 position: 13 (Change -11)
Biggest fans: Dan(20), Romain(19), Miguel(9), Dexter(13), Mindrocker(10)

Wikipedia: Conductor Arturo Toscanini gave the American premiere of Boléro with the New York Philharmonic on 14 November 1929. The performance was a great success, bringing "shouts and cheers from the audience" according to a New York Times review leading one critic to declare that "it was Toscanini who launched the career of the Boléro", and another to claim that Toscanini had made Ravel into "almost an American national hero". On 4 May 1930, Toscanini performed the work with the New York Philharmonic at the Paris Opéra as part of that orchestra's European tour. Toscanini's tempo was significantly faster than Ravel preferred, and Ravel signaled his disapproval by refusing to respond to Toscanini's gesture during the audience ovation. An exchange took place between the two men backstage after the concert. According to one account Ravel said "It's too fast", to which Toscanini responded "You don't know anything about your own music. It's the only way to save the work". According to another report Ravel said "That's not my tempo". Toscanini replied "When I play it at your tempo, it is not effective", to which Ravel retorted "Then do not play it". Four months later, Ravel attempted to smooth over relations with Toscanini by sending him a note explaining that "I have always felt that if a composer does not take part in the performance of a work, he must avoid the ovations" and, ten days later, inviting Toscanini to conduct the premiere of his Piano Concerto for the Left Hand, an invitation which was declined.



23. Dizzy Gillespie - A Night In Tunisia
(combined with the version by Charlie Parker Septet)

Year of release: 1946
Points: 252.65
Voters: 7
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 78 (2298 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 19 (Change -4)
Biggest fans: sonofsamiam(13), bonnielaurel(18), Honorio(6)

Honorio: Bebop. Every music style must generate a sub-style destined to avoid its trivialization and decadence. That was bebop for Jazz. White audiences and musicians tempered the primitive pulse of original Jazz. Bebop musicians returned the black to Jazz, with jungle rhythmic patterns (Gillespie used Latin rhtyhms when he wrote "Night in Tunisia") and a wild and even arrogant velocity (listen to the demonically fast Parker "famous alto break" at 1'18").



22. John Lee Hooker - Boogie Chillen'

Year of release: 1948
Points: 253.85
Voters: 12
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 9 (541 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 22 (No change)
Biggest fans: Bruno(13), nicolas(17)

Wikipedia: "Boogie Chillen'" or "Boogie Chillun" is a blues song first recorded by John Lee Hooker in 1948. It is a solo performance featuring Hooker's vocal, electric guitar, and rhythmic foot stomps. The lyrics are partly autobiographical and alternate between spoken and sung verses. The song was his debut record release and in 1949, it became the first "down-home" electric blues song to reach number one in the R&B records chart.



21. Leadbelly - (Black Gal) Where Did You Sleep Last Night?

Year of release: 1944
Points: 259.72
Voters: 11
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: Bubbling
2010 poll top 100 position: 8 (Change -13)
Biggest fans: DaveC(9), Brad(20), nicolas(13)

Wikipedia: "In the Pines", also known as "Where Did You Sleep Last Night?" and "Black Girl", is a traditional American folk song which dates back to at least the 1870s, and is believed to be Southern Appalachian in origin. The identity of the song's author is unknown, but it has been recorded by many artists in numerous genres. Traditionally, it is most often associated with the American folk and blues musician Lead Belly, who recorded several versions in the 1940s, as well as the American bluegrass musician Bill Monroe, who helped popularize the song (in a different variant, featuring lyrics about a train) among bluegrass and country audiences with his versions recorded in the 1940s and 1950s. The song, performed by The Four Pennies, reached the UK top twenty in 1964. A live rendering by the American alternative rock band Nirvana, which reinterpreted Lead Belly's version and was recorded during their MTV Unplugged performance in 1993, helped introduce the song to a new generation.

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Re: AMF 1900-1949 Song Poll Results

Postby DaveC » Tue Dec 13, 2016 8:18 am

20. Bessie Smith - Nobody Knows You When You're Down and Out

Year of release: 1929
Points: 265.36
Voters: 8
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: Bubbling
2010 poll top 100 position: 68 (Change +48)
Biggest fans: DaveC(13), bonnielaurel(14), andyd1010(8), Charlie Driggs(4)

Wikipedia: "Nobody Knows You When You're Down and Out" is a blues standard written by Jimmy Cox in 1923. Its lyric, told from the point of view of a one-time millionaire during the Prohibition era, reflects on the fleeting nature of material wealth and the friendships that come and go with it. When Bessie Smith's recording was released on September 13, 1929 (a Friday), the lyrics turned out to be oddly prophetic. The New York stock market had reached an all-time high less than two weeks earlier, only to go into its biggest decline two weeks later in the Wall Street Crash of 1929.



19. Duke Ellington and His Famous Orchestra - Caravan

Year of release: 1937
Points: 267.82
Voters: 7
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 126 (3274 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 12 (Change -7)
Biggest fans: bonnielaurel(2), Honorio(16), Romain(9)

Ken Dryden for AllMusic: “Caravan” is one of the most popular songs from the vast songbook of Duke Ellington, though the exotic sound of this famous work is likely due to the contributions of co-composer Juan Tizol. Initially introduced during a 1936 recording session nominally under Barney Bigard’s leadership, but in essence, Duke Ellington and His Orchestra, it was taken at a slow tempo, emphasizing the subtle shadings of the leader’s arrangement. Numerous recordings of Caravan” by Ellington exist (DaveC: > 350!) because it essentially remained in his playbook for the rest of his career.



18. Bing Crosby - White Christmas

Year of release: 1942
Points: 271.41
Voters: 7
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 13 (728 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: Henry(6), andyd1010(15), Bruno(4)

Wikipedia: "White Christmas" is a 1942 Irving Berlin song reminiscing about an old-fashioned Christmas setting. According to the Guinness World Records, the version sung by Bing Crosby is the best-selling single of all time, with estimated sales in excess of 100 million copies worldwide.



17. Scott Joplin - The Entertainer

Year of release: 1902
Points: 282.81
Voters: 8
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: Unranked
2010 poll top 100 position: 18 (Change +1)
Biggest fans: DaveC(6), Honorio(18), Miguel(2)

Wikipedia: The Entertainer is a 1902 classic piano rag written by Scott Joplin. One of the classics of ragtime, it returned to international prominence as part of the ragtime revival in the 1970s, when it was used as the theme music for the 1973 Oscar-winning film The Sting. The Sting was set in the 1930s, a full generation after the end of ragtime's mainstream popularity, thus giving the inaccurate impression that ragtime music was popular at that time.



16. George Gershwin - Summertime
(combined with the versions by Billie Holiday - 1936 & Sidney Bechet Quintet - 1939 & Tommy Dorsey - 1949?)

Year of release: 1935
Points: 303.47
Voters: 8
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 140 (3590 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 27 (Change +11)
Biggest fans: Honorio(11), Romain(1), Brad(11), jamieW(15)

Wikipedia: Summertime is an aria composed in 1934 by George Gershwin for the 1935 opera Porgy and Bess. The lyrics are by DuBose Heyward, the author of the novel Porgy on which the opera was based. The song soon became a popular and much recorded jazz standard, described as "without doubt ... one of the finest songs the composer ever wrote ... Gershwin's highly evocative writing brilliantly mixes elements of jazz and the song styles of blacks in the southeast United States from the early twentieth century". Composer and lyricist Stephen Sondheim has characterized Heyward's lyrics for "Summertime" and "My Man's Gone Now" as "the best lyrics in the musical theater". The song is recognized as one of the most covered songs in the history of recorded music, with more than 33,000 covers by groups and solo performers.

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Re: AMF 1900-1949 Song Poll Results

Postby DaveC » Tue Dec 13, 2016 6:21 pm

15. Robert Johnson - Cross Road Blues

Year of release: 1937
Points: 314.39
Voters: 7
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 7 (432 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 38 (Change +23)
Biggest fans: Listyguy(1), Honorio(10), Bruno(8), jamieW(7)

Honorio: That's where it all began. On a crossroad. At midnight. Somewhere on the Mississippi Delta. Robert Johnson had a meeting with the Devil. Johnson sold his soul to the Devil and in exchange he could play the guitar like no one else. And more important, since that moment he got the blues. The blues gave place to rock and roll, and the message of the Devil has been transmitted to succesive generations. Some say that in that crossroad Johnson simply met someone that showed him the basic chords of blues. Anyway, it's the same, isn’t it?



14. Hank Williams and His Drifting Cowboys - I'm So Lonesome I Could Cry

Year of release: 1949
Points: 325.18
Voters: 11
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 2 (195 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 41 (Change +27)
Biggest fans: andyd1010(4), Bruno(5)

Rolling Stone: Not just one of country music's most evocatively ripe lyrics but maybe also its most acute diagnosis of clinical depression: Everything the singer encounters from the weep of a robin to the whine of a train to the fact that a falling star makes no sound at all mirrors his dark mood. Hank thought it was a poem, not a song, written initially for his alter ego "Luke the Drifter" to recite. Good thing he reconsidered: Without the gentle lope of the melody softening the mood, what Elvis introduced as "probably the saddest song I've ever heard" during his legendary 1973 televised concert in Hawaii might have been too hopeless to endure.



13. Louis Armstrong - West End Blues

Year of release: 1928
Points: 348.6
Voters: 10
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 5 (424 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 47 (Change +34)
Biggest fans: sonofsamiam(9), bonnielaurel(8), Henry(19), Bruno(7), Dexter(8)

Stephen Thomas Erlewine for AllMusic: King Oliver's "West End Blues" is one of the keystones of jazz and, therefore, American popular music, but even more than that, Louis Armstrong's 1928 version, cut with his Hot Five, is a towering achievement. Not only is it the version that cemented the tune in popular consciousness, it helped define what jazz could be. Armstrong started his professional career in King Oliver's band, and he never lost sight of what he learned from Oliver, which, after all, was at the foundation of his very style. Nevertheless, Armstrong's reading of "West End Blues" still must have come as quite a shock, since it begins with a multi-layered, complex solo introduction from "Satchmo" that essentially set the standard for jazz musicians. Not just for trumpeters, either, although many strived to emulate what he achieved here. No, the lyrical phrases that Armstrong played were so wildly influential, fiercely musical, and technically devastating that it remains a hallmark for jazz musicians of all stripes. That's because it's not just a dazzling display of technique, although that's certainly part of it. It's because he applies his technique in tremendously innovative ways -- long phrases give way to furious bursts of notes, invigorating syncopations, startling high notes, and, ultimately, the slow melodic shuffle of Oliver's basic tune. Oliver's song itself is a classic New Orleans jazz piece, but it's become impossible to separate it from Armstrong's astonishing opening solo -- a solo that has defined the song as much as the melody itself.



12. Louis Armstrong and His Savoy Ballroom Five - St. James Infirmary
(combined with the version by Artie Shaw & Hot Lips Page - 1941)

Year of release: 1929
Points: 374.8
Voters: 11
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 62 (1872 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 4 (Change -8)
Biggest fans: Honorio(15), Romain(5), Mindrocker(15), jamieW(13)

Thomas Ward for AllMusic: One of Louis Armstrong’s most instantly recognisable pieces, “St. James Infirmary” is a bone fide classic, a song which the artist would perform for the rest of his career. His original, recorded with Earl Hines in 1928 is undoubtedly the finest version on record, still sounding vibrant, alive and full of inspiration. The music moves at a stately pace, reminding one the music at a New Orleans jazz funeral. Armstrong’s trumpet is powerful and simple, and does not attempt any of the burst of notes that characterise many of the recordings of this period. Louis’ vocal is also assured, and he sings it with a masterful grasp of phrasing and subtlety. One of Armstrong’s finest recordings with the “hot seven”.



11. Nat King Cole - Nature Boy

Year of release: 1948
Points: 393.59
Voters: 10
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 66 (2033 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: DaveC(8), bonnielaurel(4), Dan(3), Romain(12), jamieW(10)

Songfacts: This song was written by Eden Ahbez, one of the strangest songwriters of the pre-Hippie era. He was a beatnik poet, but more accurately a proto-Hippie, choosing to wear long hair, a full beard and long, white, flowing garments that promoted a Christ-like appearance. He lived in Griffith Park in Los Angeles and ate fruit, vegetables and nuts. Ahbez was born in Brooklyn in 1908, and he claimed to have been raised in an orphanage and to have crossed the US on foot 8 times before age 35. He moved to Los Angeles in the '40s, lived on 3 dollars a week, and lectured on Hollywood street corners about Oriental mysticism.

DaveC: Highest new entry.

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Re: AMF 1900-1949 Song Poll Results

Postby Listyguy » Tue Dec 13, 2016 6:35 pm

Great to see Robert Johnson soar so high on this list! Part of me questions how "Cross Roads" ever managed to finish at 38 in the original poll though...
That said, I'm very excited to see how the top 10 plays out. There's a few songs left that I never thought would be in the top 10!

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Re: AMF 1900-1949 Song Poll Results

Postby Bruno » Tue Dec 13, 2016 6:50 pm

What a great list!

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Re: AMF 1900-1949 Song Poll Results

Postby DaveC » Wed Dec 14, 2016 9:14 am

10. Glenn Miller & His Orchestra - Moonlight Serenade

Year of release: 1939
Points: 417.63
Voters: 8
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 30 (1191 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 21 (Change +11)
Biggest fans: DaveC(17), Henry(17), Honorio(9), Romain(18), Miguel(11), andyd1010(9), Bruno(12), jamieW(3)

Honorio: I don’t remember the exact reason why Miller had to rearrange the main melody for a lead clarinet but I remember a scene on the movie "The Glenn Miller Story" writing it in a hurry just before the premiere. Anyway it was a master move, the sound of clarinets and muted trumpets gave it a dreamy atmosphere, like the opening of a door getting you back in time, to a period where young couples in love danced slowly to the sound coming from an old radio.

DaveC: With all 8 votes being top 20, this would appear to be in the 'love it or hate it' category.



9. Claude Debussy - Suite bergamasque: III. Clair de lune

Year of release: 1905
Points: 417.98
Voters: 6
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: Unranked
2010 poll top 100 position: 5 (Change -4)
Biggest fans: sonofsamiam(3), Henry(1), Dan(2), andyd1010(11), Dexter(6)

Wikipedia: The third and most famous movement of Suite bergamasque is "Clair de lune", in D-flat major. Its name comes from Verlaine's poem Clair de lune, "moonlight" in French. It is written in the 9/8 meter, marked andante très expressif, and to be played mostly pianissimo. Musically, Debussy's "Clair de lune" belongs to French Impressionism.



8. Benny Goodman - Sing, Sing, Sing (With a Swing)
(combined with the version by Louis Prima - 1936)

Year of release: 1937
Points: 469.6
Voters: 11
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 29 (1082 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 9 (Change +1)
Biggest fans: Listyguy(12), Henry(18), Romain(15), andyd1010(1), Brad(8), jamieW(8)

Cub Koda for AllMusic: One of the best-known tunes of the jazz era started life as a vocal written by Italy's favorite son, Louis Prima, as "Sing, Sing, Sing (With a Swing)." But its best-known version is the rendition by Benny Goodman and His Orchestra which elevated the song to that of a swing music classic. Largely a showcase for drummer Gene Krupa's explosive tom tom work, the tune in its live performance also featured exceptional soloing from Goodman and pianist Jess Stacy,



7. Sergei Prokofiev - Romeo and Juliet: Dance of the Knights / Montagues and Capulets

Year of release: 1937
Points: 474.18
Voters: 9
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: Unranked
2010 poll top 100 position: 3 (Change -4)
Biggest fans: Henry(8), Honorio(1), Miguel(20), andyd1010(10), Dexter(14), jamieW(4), nicolas(11)

Honorio: The introduction of the piece "Montagues and Capulets" from the "Romeo and Juliet" Suite for Orchestra (not on the "Dance of the Knights" of the original music for the ballet) builds from silence climaxing quickly into an impressive disonant orchestral chord. A friend of mine used to say that this chord "contains all the music in the world". Maybe he was true but for me the real highlight is that dramatic ascending and descending melody played by the string section over an ominous march rhythm sustained by the double basses and horns. The sounds of the tragedy.



6. Édith Piaf - La vie en rose

Year of release: 1947
Points: 494.39
Voters: 12
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 8 (521 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 25 (Change +19)
Biggest fans: DaveC(2), bonnielaurel(16), Romain(6), Bruno(17), Dexter(9), Brad(10)

Wikipedia: The lyrics and melody of the song were written by Édith Piaf herself, but the melody was said officially to have been composed and registered by Louis Guglielmi, since at the time, due to the stringent registration requirements of SACEM (French music copyright organisation), Piaf did not have the necessary qualifications to be able to copyright her work with SACEM. Piaf offered the song to Marianne Michel, who slightly modified the lyrics, changing "les choses" ("things") for "la vie" ("life"). In 1943, Piaf had performed at a nightclub/bordello called "La Vie en Rose". Initially, Piaf's peers and songwriting team did not think the song would be successful, finding it weaker than the rest of her repertoire. Heeding their advice, the singer put the song aside, only to change her mind the next year. The song was performed live in concert for the first time in 1946. It became a favorite with audiences. "La Vie en rose" was the song that made Piaf internationally famous, with its lyrics telling about the joy of finding true love and appealing to those who had survived the difficult wartime.

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Re: AMF 1900-1949 Song Poll Results

Postby DaveC » Wed Dec 14, 2016 6:30 pm

5. Glenn Miller and His Orchestra - In the Mood

Year of release: 1939
Points: 498.53
Voters: 13
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 14 (745 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 26 (Change +21)
Biggest fans: bonnielaurel(20), Henry(7), andyd1010(3), Bruno(1), Brad(14)

Songfacts: "In The Mood" is an expression that indicates a desire to have sex. It's pretty innocent now, but was a little racy at the time. Beatles producer George Martin had the orchestra play a little bit of this song at the end of "All You Need Is Love."



4. George Gershwin - Rhapsody In Blue
(combined with the version by Paul Whiteman and his Orchestra - 1927)

Year of release: 1924
Points: 516.72
Voters: 10
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 34 (1357 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 2 (Change -2)
Biggest fans: sonofsamiam(8), Henry(3), Miguel(13), andyd1010(2), Dexter(7), Brad(1)

Critic Lawrence Gilman, writing in the New York Tribune on February 13, 1924: How trite, feeble and conventional the tunes are; how sentimental and vapid the harmonic treatment, under its disguise of fussy and futile counterpoint! ... Weep over the lifelessness of the melody and harmony, so derivative, so stale, so inexpressive!

We: Don't agree!

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Re: AMF 1900-1949 Song Poll Results

Postby Henry » Wed Dec 14, 2016 9:18 pm

I wonder how many of the following will be in the top 3:

Billie Holiday / Strange Fruit
Judy Garland / Over the Rainbow
Duke Ellington / Take the "A" Train

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Re: AMF 1900-1949 Song Poll Results

Postby Listyguy » Thu Dec 15, 2016 12:42 am

Henry wrote:I wonder how many of the following will be in the top 3:

Billie Holiday / Strange Fruit
Judy Garland / Over the Rainbow
Duke Ellington / Take the "A" Train


These are the three I'd imagine make up the rest of the list. To be honest, I"m not a huge fan of "Over the Rainbow". It's a good song and all, but I'd hardly put it in the same class as the other two songs in that list.

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Re: AMF 1900-1949 Song Poll Results

Postby DaveC » Thu Dec 15, 2016 2:02 am

Our #1 - and the large margin of victory - is no surprise.

Our #2 - possibly more surprisingly - also took it's place by a good margin.

Our #3 did significantly better than last time.





3. Duke Ellington and His Famous Orchestra - Take the 'A' Train

Year of release: 1941
Points: 566.69
Voters: 13
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 16 (889 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 14 (Change +11)
Biggest fans: sonofsamiam(5), bonnielaurel(13), Henry(2), Bruno(11), Dexter(10), Brad(3), jamieW(19)

Songfacts: Billy Strayhorn had played for Ellington after a show in Pittsburgh in 1938. He mimicked the orchestra's rendition of "Sophisticated Lady," then boldly played his own version. Ellington was so impressed, it eventually led to an invitation to Ellington's home in the wealthy Sugar Hill neighborhood. Using the subway directions that Ellington gave him, Strayhorn wrote, "Take the A Train." He composed it in his head at a party, and then put it all on paper when he was done. He said all of his most meaningful work was written this way. When Strayhorn played the song for Ellington after a show in Newark, a partnership that would last the rest of Strayhorn's life had begun.

DaveC: This is Duke Ellington's sixth entry in our top 100!


2. Judy Garland - Over the Rainbow

Year of release: 1939
Points: 709.28
Voters: 13
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 4 (325 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 6 (Change +4)
Biggest fans: DaveC(7), Henry(4), Honorio(3), Romain(8), Miguel(17), andyd1010(16), Charlie Driggs(6), Bruno(3), jamieW(1)

Honorio: Yes, I know, it's a children's song, a lullaby. But, since my first conscious exposition to it was as part of the stage show "Flowers" directed by Lindsay Kemp (that I saw in 1980 when I was 14 years old) where it was sung by a blind black drag-queen dressed in rags (played by Jack Birkett) and surrounded by transvestites, whores and pimps, the song despite its naivete and sweetness always comes to me as twisted and bizarre. And that’s what it’s not. Or maybe yes? Or maybe there is no innocence without perversion?



1. Billie Holiday - Strange Fruit

Year of release: 1939
Points: 1169.46
Voters: 15
AM 1900-1949 Songs Rank: 1 (71 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 1 (No change)
Biggest fans: sonofsamiam(1), DaveC(1), Listyguy(9), bonnielaurel(1), Henry(15), Dan(4), Honorio(2), Romain(20), Charlie Driggs(2), Bruno(2), Dexter(11), Mindrocker(3), Brad(6), jamieW(2), nicolas(3)

Abel Meeropol (writer of the song): She gave a startling, most dramatic and effective interpretation which could jolt an audience out of its complacency anywhere, This was exactly what I wanted the song to do and why I wrote it.

Honorio: The best song of the first half of the XX Century according to AM Forum (on the 2010 poll) is this protest song that portrays solemnly the lynching of black people in America. And that's because it represents like no other song the soul of the African American people, this immeasurable sadness that sums decades and centuries of suffering and injustice. Everyone would file this song under the label of Jazz but it surely got this thing that it's called the Blues.

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Re: AMF 1900-1949 Song Poll Results

Postby jamieW » Thu Dec 15, 2016 2:55 am

Thanks so much for all three presentations, DaveC! Your choices of photos and comments were both outstanding. (Of course, any time you use Honorio's beautifully written observations, you can't possibly go wrong.)

Thanks, too, to everyone who participated. You all have such great, diverse tastes that the final results were certain to be equally eclectic and awesome, and I made so many excellent discoveries along the way. I really appreciate it! :music-listening:

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Re: AMF 1900-1949 Song Poll Results

Postby Listyguy » Thu Dec 15, 2016 4:54 am

Excellent poll, Jamie and Dave! It will provide me with a nice collection of new music to listen to from an era of music that I don't know enough about.

On "Strange Fruit", I've found it interesting how it's rose in recent years on the AM list. It used to be somewhere in the 100s, and got down to 59 at one point if I remember correctly. Is it just a coincidence that the song's rise has come in a time of increasing social unrest about the way black people are treated in the United States?

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Re: AMF 1900-1949 Song Poll Results

Postby Dexter » Thu Dec 15, 2016 5:17 am

Top notch job overall JamieW and Dave C! For me, the best poll-hosting duo this forum has ever had. The seamless presentation of DaveC and data and reference gathering by JamieW (despite his fears of a disastrous 1900-1949 poll result presentation) are a match made in music heaven. Shout out to the voters too for the varied and interesting songs they listed.

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Re: AMF 1900-1949 Song Poll Results

Postby bonnielaurel » Thu Dec 15, 2016 7:08 am

This was a unique project that led to many discoveries. Many of these songs I learned to know in a more recent version, in an adaptation for choir (a.o. Nature Boy), used in a commercial or a film... To discover the originals gives a much better insight in the roots of popular music. It would also be interesting to see which songwriters are most represented: Cole Porter, George Gershwin...

Thanks again to the JamieW and DaveC, the best comical duo since Laurel and Hardy.

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Dan
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Re: AMF 1900-1949 Song Poll Results

Postby Dan » Thu Dec 15, 2016 8:00 pm

Thanks once again, DaveC, for the wonderful presentation and quote selection. And jeez, jamieW, congratulations on keeping track of who performed what which is actually the same song as what performed by another who. What? Who sang what too? Job well done.

We ended up with an amazing selection of songs and pieces. My favourite thing about this poll is Nat King Cole's "Nature Boy" coming out of nowhere to nearly crack the top 10.

Thanks again.
Let's make this a good year.

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Romain
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Re: AMF 1900-1949 Song Poll Results

Postby Romain » Thu Dec 15, 2016 8:34 pm

How to say how I'm grateful for your wonderful job. Both of you deserve thousand kisses to make a so good work.

And the result is definitively a result I like.

So all is perfect.

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Re: AMF 1900-1949 Song Poll Results

Postby DaveC » Fri Dec 16, 2016 7:40 am

I will post the full list in a day or two.

Thank you to everyone who voted. It was great that so many diverse lists were submitted.

A special thank you to JamieW for making these polls happen, and for doing all the hard work.

And thanks for the thanks.

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prosecutorgodot
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Re: AMF 1900-1949 Song Poll Results

Postby prosecutorgodot » Fri Dec 16, 2016 8:00 am

A very sexy duo indeed, haha. Great job.

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Re: AMF 1900-1949 Song Poll Results

Postby jamieW » Fri Dec 16, 2016 11:49 am

Thanks for the kind words, everyone! It was a pleasure and I enjoyed every moment of it (even during the times I was losing even more hair to stress).

And a special thank you right back to DaveC! He's too considerate to ever mention it here, but there were mistakes discovered along the way, and he caught and corrected them early. I really appreciate all of the extra work he put into this, well beyond just the wonderful presentations themselves!

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Re: AMF 1900-1949 Song Poll Results

Postby jamieW » Fri Dec 16, 2016 12:07 pm

Dan wrote:Thanks once again, DaveC, for the wonderful presentation and quote selection. And jeez, jamieW, congratulations on keeping track of who performed what which is actually the same song as what performed by another who. What? Who sang what too? Job well done.


One final word on this: I don't know if there will be another 1900-49 poll. (Sadly, as time moves on, there will be less and less interest in this great era of music.) But if there is, to the next host, please be warned by Dan's equally wise and hilarious words above. I don't think the experience could ever be described more accurately!

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Re: AMF 1900-1949 Song Poll Results

Postby DaveC » Mon Dec 19, 2016 5:21 am

The full list:-

1 | Billie Holiday | Strange Fruit | 1939
2 | Judy Garland | Over the Rainbow | 1939
3 | Duke Ellington and His Famous Orchestra | Take the 'A' Train | 1941
4 | George Gershwin // Paul Whiteman Orchestra - 1927 | Rhapsody In Blue | 1924
5 | Glenn Miller and His Orchestra | In the Mood | 1939
6 | Édith Piaf | La vie en rose | 1947
7 | Sergei Prokofiev | Romeo and Juliet: Dance of the Knights/ Montagues and Capulets | 1937
8 | Benny Goodman // Louis Prima - 1936 | Sing, Sing, Sing (With a Swing) | 1936
9 | Claude Debussy | Suite bergamasque: III. Clair de lune | 1905
10 | Glenn Miller & His Orchestra | Moonlight Serenade | 1939
11 | Nat King Cole | Nature Boy | 1948
12 | Louis Armstrong and His Savoy Ballroom Five // Artie Shaw & Hot Lips Page - 1941 | St. James Infirmary | 1929
13 | Louis Armstrong | West End Blues | 1928
14 | Hank Williams and His Drifting Cowboys | I'm So Lonesome I Could Cry | 1949
15 | Robert Johnson | Cross Road Blues | 1937
16 | George Gershwin // Billie Holiday - 1936 // Tommy Dorsey - 1949? | Summertime | 1935
17 | Scott Joplin | The Entertainer | 1902
18 | Bing Crosby | White Christmas | 1942
19 | Duke Ellington and His Famous Orchestra | Caravan | 1937
20 | Bessie Smith | Nobody Knows You When You're Down and Out | 1929
21 | Leadbelly | (Black Gal) Where Did You Sleep Last Night? | 1944
22 | John Lee Hooker | Boogie Chillen | 1948
23 | Dizzy Gillespie // Charlie Parker Septet | A Night In Tunisia | 1946
24 | Maurice Ravel | Boléro | 1928
25 | Duke Ellington and His Orchestra | The Mooche | 1928
26 | Blind Willie Johnson | Dark Was the Night, Cold Was the Ground | 1928
27 | Quinette du Hot Club de France/ Django Reinhardt & Stéphane Grappelli | Minor Swing | 1937
28 | Hank Williams and His Drifting Cowboys | Move It On Over | 1947
29 | Woody Guthrie | This Land Is Your Land | 1947
30 | Leadbelly | Goodnight Irene | 1943
31 | Coleman Hawkins and His Orchestra // Frank Sinatra - 1949 | Body and Soul | 1939
32 | Carl Orff | Carmina Burana: Fortuna Imperatrix Mundi - O Fortuna | 1937
33 | Samuel Barber | Adagio for Strings | 1938
34 | Thelonious Monk Quintet | Round About Midnight | 1948
35 | Bill Monroe & His Blue Grass Boys | Blue Moon of Kentucky | 1947
36 | Lester Flatt & Earl Scruggs | Foggy Mountain Breakdown | 1949
37 | Charles Trenet | La mer | 1946
38 | Django Reinhardt w/ Le Quintette du Hot Club de France | Nuages | 1940
39 | Artie Shaw and His Orchestra | Nightmare | 1938
40 | Louis Jordan and His Tympany Five | Choo Choo Ch'Boogie | 1946
41 | Anton Karas | The "Harry Lime" Theme from The Third Man | 1949
42 | Jean Sibelius | Finlandia | 1900
43 | Mahalia Jackson | Move On Up a Little Higher | 1948
44 | Lena Horne // Ethel Waters - 1933 | Stormy Weather | 1942
45 | Jimmie Rodgers // Bob Wills - 1939 | Gambling Bar Room Blues // Drunkard Blues | 1933
46 | Le Quintette du Hot Club de France (Django Reinhardt & Stéphane Grapelli) | Limehouse Blues | 1936
47 | Harlem Hamfats // Lil Green - 1941 | Weed Smoker's Dream // Why Don't You Do Right | 1936
48 | Bessie Smith // Louis Armstrong & His Orchestra - 1930 | St. Louis Blues | 1925
49 | Robert Johnson | Hellhound on My Trail | 1937
50 | Cab Calloway | Minnie the Moocher | 1931
51 | Billie Holiday | God Bless the Child | 1941
52 | Mississippi John Hurt // Long "Cleve" Reed & Little Harvey Hull - 1927 | Stack O' Lee Blues | 1929
53 | Hoagy Carmichael // Louis Armstrong // Artie Shaw | Star Dust | 1928
54 | Igor Stravinsky | Le sacre du printemps: I. L'adoration de la terre (The Rite of Spring: Adoration of the Earth) | 1913
55 | Trio Matamoros | Lágrimas negras | 1932
56 | Sergei Rachmaninoff | Piano Concerto No. 2 in C minor: II. Adagio sostenuto | 1901
57 | Aaron Copland | Fanfare For the Common Man | 1943
58 | Yves Montand | Les feuilles mortes | 1946
59 | Fats Waller | Ain't Misbehavin' | 1929
60 | Édith Piaf | L'accordéoniste | 1940
61 | Charlie Parker | Ko Ko | 1946
62 | Hot Lips Page | I Won't Be Here Long | 1940
63 | The Andrews Sisters | Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy | 1941
64 | Eric Satie | Je te veux | 1903
65 | Les Brown & His Orchestra with Doris Day | Sentimental Journey | 1944
66 | Igor Stravinsky | Le sacre du printemps: II. Le Sacrifice (The Rite of Spring: The Sacrifice) | 1913
67 | Duke Ellington Featuring Ivie Anderson | It Don't Mean a Thing (If It Ain't Got That Swing) | 1932
68 | Hank Williams and His Drifting Cowboys | Lost Highway | 1949
69 | Robert Johnson | I Believe I'll Dust My Broom | 1937
70 | Duke Ellington & His Cotton Club Orchestra | Mood Indigo | 1930
71 | Joaquin Rodrigo | Concierto de Aranjuez: II. Adagio | 1940
72 | Count Basie and His Orchestra | One O'Clock Jump | 1937
73 | Carlos Gardel | El día que me quieras | 1935
74 | Geeshie Wiley | Last Kind Words Blues | 1930
75 | Robert Johnson | Sweet Home Chicago | 1937
76 | The Andrews Sisters // Léo Marjane - 1938 | Bei mir bist du schön | 1937
77 | Carlos Gardel | Volver | 1935
78 | Louis Jordan and His Tympany Five | Caldonia (Boogie) (What Makes Your Big Head So Hard?) | 1945
79 | Giacomo Puccini | Nessun dorma from Turandot | 1926
80 | Jimmie Rodgers | Blue Yodel #1 (T For Texas) | 1928
81 | Ella Fitzgerald // Django Reinhardt | How High the Moon | 1947
82 | Kate Smith | God Bless America | 1939
83 | Kurt Weill | Speak Low | 1943
84 | Vaughn Monroe // Peggy Lee | (Ghost) Riders in the Sky (A Cowboy Legend) | 1949
85 | Concha Piquer | Tatuaje | 1941
86 | Hank Williams and His Drifting Cowboys | Lovesick Blues | 1949
87 | The Boswell Sisters // Fred Astaire | Cheek To Cheek | 1935
88 | The Carter Family | Can The Circle Be Unbroken (Bye and Bye) | 1935
89 | The Mills Brothers | Paper Doll | 1942
90 | Skip James | Devil Got My Woman | 1931
91 | Alfred Apaka & His Hawaiians | Na Moku Eha | 1947
92 | Edward Elgar | Pomp and Circumstance March No. 1 in D major | 1901
93 | Antonio Machín | Angelitos negros | 1947
94 | Blind Willie Johnson | Praise God I'm Satisfied | 1930
95 | Vera Lynn | We'll Meet Again | 1939
96 | Duke Ellington and His Kentucky Club Orchestra | East St. Louis Toodle-oo | 1927
97 | Billie Holiday // Damia -1936 | Gloomy Sunday // Sombre Dimanche | 1941
98 | Django Reinhardt & Stéphane Grapelli | Echoes of France | 1946
99 | Louis Jordan and His Tympany Five | Five Guys Named Moe | 1943
100 | Professor Longhair | Mardi Gras in New Orleans | 1949
101 | Gustav Mahler | Symphony No. 5 in C sharp minor: IV. Adagietto (Sehr langsam) | 1904
102 | Lotte Lenya | Die Dreigroschenoper: Seeräuber Jenny | 1930
103 | Sergei Rachmaninoff | Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini: Variation 18. Andante cantabile | 1934
104 | Dizzy Gillespie and His Orchestra | Manteca | 1948
105 | Max Steiner | Tara's Theme from Gone with the Wind | 1939
106 | Enrico Caruso | O sole mio | 1916
107 | Growling Tiger | Money Is King | 1935
108 | Lord Invader, Macbeth the Great, Duke of Iron | Calypso War | 1946
109 | Andres Segovia | Leyenda | 1924
110 | Nat King Cole | (Get Your Kicks On) Route 66 | 1946
111 | Robert Johnson | 32-20 Blues | 1937
112 | Bessie Smith // Lonnie Johnson - 1928 | Careless Love | 1925
113 | Scott Joplin | The Easy Winners | 1901
114 | Robert Johnson | Love in Vain Blues | 1937
115 | Duke Ellington // Cootie Williams - 1944 | Echoes of Harlem | 1936
116 | Amália Rodrigues | Ai, Mouraria | 1945
117 | Henry Thomas | Bull Doze Blues | 1928
118 | Muddy Waters | I Can't Be Satisfied | 1948
119 | Billie Holiday | The Man I Love | 1939
120 | Washington Phillips | Denomination Blues | 1927
120 | George W. Johnson | The Laughing Coon (second version) | 1902
120 | Leadbelly | There's a Man Going Round Taking Names | 1944
123 | Lionel Hampton and Orchestra | Wizzin' the Wizz | 1939
124 | Carlos Gardel | Mano a mano | 1923
125 | Francisco Alves | Aquarela do Brazil | 1939
126 | Leadbelly | The Midnight Special | 1940
127 | Patsy Montana | I Want to Be a Cowboy's Sweetheart | 1935
128 | Al Jolson | Swanee | 1920
129 | Charlie Parker Septet | Ornithology | 1946
130 | Jimmy Preston | Rock This Joint | 1949
131 | Frank Sinatra | Saturday Night (Is the Loneliest Night of the Week) | 1944
132 | Don Azpiazú and His Havana Casino Orchestra w/ Antonio Machín | El Manicero (The Peanut Vender) | 1930
133 | Ted Gossett | Fire on the Mountain | 1930
133 | Gustav Holst | Jupiter, the Bringer of Jollity | 1918
135 | Bob Wills and His Texas Playboys | New San Antonio Rose | 1940
136 | Ella Fitzgerald // Django Reinhardt | Lady Be Good | 1947
137 | Marlene Dietrich // Lale Andersen | Lili Marleen | 1945
138 | Lionel Hampton and His Orchestra // Oscar Peterson - 1945 | Flying Home | 1942
139 | Aram Khachaturian/ Woody Herman & His Orchestra | Gayane: Sabre Dance | 1942
140 | Berthe Sylva | Les roses blanches | 1925
141 | Jack McVea and His All Stars | Open The Door, Richard | 1946
142 | Antonio Machín | Dos gardenias | 1947
143 | The Ink Spots | If I Didn't Care | 1939
144 | The Orioles | It's Too Soon To Know | 1948
145 | Lydia Mendoza | Mal Hombre | 1934
146 | Sam McGee | Railroad Blues | 1928
147 | Rina Ketty | J'attendrai | 1938
148 | Count Basie with Lester Young | Lester Leaps In | 1939
149 | Béla Bartók | Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta: III. Adagio | 1936
150 | Igor Stravinsky | The Firebird (finale) | 1919
151 | John Cage | Imaginary Landscape No. 1 | 1939
152 | Blind Willie McTell | Statesboro Blues | 1928
153 | Antonio Álvarez Alonso | Suspiros de España | 1902
153 | Olivier Messiaen | Turangalîla-Symphonie: I. Introduction | 1949
153 | Golden Gate Quartet | Way Down in Egyptland (Go Down Moses) | 1939
156 | Bing Crosby | Swinging on a Star | 1944
157 | Jimmie Davis // Gene Autry - 1941 | You Are My Sunshine | 1940
158 | Lucienne Boyer | Parlez-moi d'amour | 1930
159 | Woody Guthrie | 1913 Massacre | 1941
160 | Art Tatum // Frank Sinatra & Dinah Shore | Tea For Two | 1933
161 | Arthur Smith | Guitar Boogie | 1945
162 | Robert Johnson | Stop Breaking Down Blues | 1937
163 | Louis Jordan and His Tympany Five | Is You Is Or Is You Ain't (Ma' Baby) | 1944
164 | Robert Johnson | Come On In My Kitchen | 1937
165 | Louis Jordan and His Tympany Five | Saturday Night Fish Fry | 1949
166 | Aaron Copland | Four Dance Episodes from Rodeo: IV. Hoedown | 1942
167 | Roy Brown // Wynonie Harris 1948 | Good Rockin' Tonight | 1947
168 | Ethel Waters // Django Reinhardt | Sweet Georgia Brown | 1925
169 | Billie Holiday | Don't Explain | 1946
170 | Son House | Death Letter | 1931
171 | Miklos Rozsa | Main Theme (From "Spellbound") | 1945
172 | Paul Whiteman and His Ambassador Orchestra | Whispering | 1920
173 | The Lion | Bing Crosby | 1936
173 | James P. Johnson | Carolina Shout | 1922
173 | Giacomo Puccini | O mio babbino caro from Gianni Schicchi | 1918
173 | Buddy Boy Hawkins | Voice Throwing Blues | 1929
177 | Duke Ellington and His Orchestra | In a Sentimental Mood | 1945
178 | Henri Betti // Jacques Hélian | C'est si bon | 1947
179 | Emilio Tuero | Besame mucho | 1941
180 | Nat King Cole/ The King Cole Trio | The Christmas Song (Merry Christmas To You) | 1946
181 | New Orleans Feetwarmers w/ Sidney Bechet | I've Found a New Baby | 1932
182 | Django Reinhardt and the Quintet of the Hot Club of France | I'll See You In My Dreams | 1946
182 | Elders McIntorsh And Edwards | Since I Laid My Burden Down | 1928
182 | Blind Lemon Jefferson | That Black Snake Moan | 1927
182 | Gustav Holst | The Planets: IV. Jupiter, the Bringer of Jollity | 1916
186 | Ralph Vaughan Williams | Fantasia On Greensleeves | 1934
187 | Trio Matamoros | Son de la loma | 1925
188 | Artie Shaw | Begin the Beguine | 1938
189 | Judy Garland | Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas | 1944
190 | Count Basie and His Orchestra | Jumpin' at the Woodside | 1938
191 | The Jungle Band | Black And Blue | 1929
191 | Duke Ellington and His Orchestra | Creole Love Call | 1928
191 | Robert Johnson | Drunken Hearted Man | 1937
191 | Louis Armstrong | Mack the Knife | ????
195 | Sister Rosetta Tharpe | Strange Things Happening Every Day | 1945
195 | The Carter Family | Wildwood Flower | 1928
197 | Bessie Smith | Empty Bed Blues | 1928
198 | The Andrews Sisters // Lord Invader | Rum and Coca-Cola | 1944
199 | Carlos Gardel | Mi Buenos Aires querido | 1934
199 | Harry Lauder | Stop Your Ticklin' Jock (second version) | 1910
201 | Original Dixieland Jazz Band // Mills Brothers // Art Tatum - 1933 | Tiger Rag | 1931
202 | Count Basie | Topsy | 1938
203 | Charles Trenet | Boum! | 1940
203 | Hoagy Carmichael & His Orchestra | Georgia on My Mind | 1930
205 | Solomon Linda's Original Evening Birds | Mbube | 1939
206 | Olivier Messiaen | Quatuor pour la fin du temps: VII. Fouillis d'arcs-en-ciel, pour l'Ange qui annonce la fin du temps | 1941
207 | Frank Sinatra w/ Harry James | All or Nothing at All | 1939
208 | Bing Crosby | Silent Night | 1945
209 | Big Joe Williams' Washboard Blues Singers // Lightnin' Hopkins - 1947 | Baby Please Don't Go | 1935
210 | Leadbelly | House of the Rising Sun | 1944
211 | Gene Autry | Back In the Saddle Again | 1939
212 | Golden Gate Quartet | Golden Gate Gospel Train | 1937
212 | Robert Johnson | They're Red Hot | 1937
214 | Harry Richman // Fred Astaire - 1947 | Puttin' On the Ritz | 1930
215 | Bessie Smith | Graveyard Dream Blues | 1923
216 | Gustav Holst | The Planets: I. Mars, the Bringer of War | 1916
217 | Edgard Varèse | Amériques | 1926
217 | Sarah Vaughan | Black Coffee | 1949
217 | John Lee Hooker | Devil's Jump | 1949
220 | Rudy Valée // Doolie Wilson - 1942 | As Time Goes By | 1931
221 | Fletcher Henderson and His Orchestra | Take Me Away From The River | 1932
222 | Cliff Edwards | When You Wish Upon a Star | 1940
223 | Vera Lynn | The White Cliffs of Dover | 1942
224 | Manuel De Falla | El amor brujo: X. Canción del fuego fatuo | 1916
225 | Cole Porter | Anything Goes | 1934
226 | Maurice Ravel | Daphnis et Chloe, Suite No. 2 | 1912
227 | Ella Fitzgerald & Louis Jordan | Baby It's Cold Outside | 1949
227 | Louis Armstrong and His Hot Five | Big Fat Ma and Skinny Pa | 1926
227 | Glenn Miller and His Orchestra | Pennsylvania 6-5000 | 1940
230 | Billie Holiday // Dizzy Gillespie & Sarah Vaughan - 1945 | Lover Man (Oh Where Can You Be) | 1935
231 | Alexander Mosolov | The Iron Foundry | 1927
232 | Sophie Tucker | Some of These Days | 1911
233 | Mississippi John Hurt | Candy Man Blues | 1928
234 | Leo Reisman and His Orchestra w/ Frank Sinatra | Night and Day | 1932
235 | Edward Elgar | Cello Concerto in E minor: I. Adagio | 1919
236 | Glenn Miller and His Orchestra | Chattanooga Choo Choo | 1941
237 | Lotte Lenya and The Three Admirals | Alabama-Song | 1930
238 | Skip James | Hard Time Killin' Floor Blues | 1931
239 | Dizzy Gillespie | Salt Peanuts | 1945
240 | Darius Milhaud | La Creation du Monde | 1923
241 | Carlos Gardel | Por una cabeza | 1935
242 | Claude Debussy | Children's Corner: VI. Golliwogg's Cakewalk | 1908
242 | The Carter Family | Gospel Ship | 1935
242 | Johnny Marvin | Hooray For The Irish | 1926
242 | Pete Seeger | If I Had a Hammer | 1949
242 | Sergei Prokofiev | Piano Concerto No. 3: I. Andante - Allegro | 1921
247 | Nat King Cole // Django Reinhardt & Stéphane Grappelli | Honeysuckle Rose | 1938
248 | Bessie Smith | Downhearted Blues | 1923
249 | Duke Ellington and His Orchestra | Black, Brown and Beige | 1944
249 | Joseíto Fernández | Guantanamera | 1929
249 | Walter Jacobs and Carter Brothers | That’s It | 1930
249 | Igor Stravinsky | The Shrove-Tide Fair | 1911
253 | Chick Webb and His Orchestra F/ Ella Fitzgerald | A-Tisket, A-Tasket | 1938
254 | Ramon Montoya | Soleá | 1936
255 | Jimmie Noone and His Apex Club Orchestra // Trixie Smith | My Daddy Rocks Me (With One Steady Roll) | 1929
256 | Scott Joplin | Pineapple Rag | 1908
257 | Atilla the Hun | Treasury Scandal | 1928
258 | A. C. (Eck) Robertson | Sally Gooden | 1922
259 | Mykola Leontovych | Carol of the Bells | 1916
259 | Sister Rosetta Tharpe | Didn't It Rain | 1946
259 | Sidney Bechet | Egyptian Fantasy | 1941
259 | Dmitri Shostakovich | Suite for Jazz Orchestra No.1: I. Waltz | 1934
263 | The Carter Family / Roy Acuff | Wabash Cannonball | 1932
264 | Claude Debussy | La mer: III. Dialogue du vent et de la mer | 1905
265 | DeZurik Sisters | Arizona Yodeler | 1938
265 | Reinhold Glière | Harp Concerto in E flat major: I. Allegro moderato | 1938
265 | Hank Williams and His Drifting Cowboys | I Saw the Light | 1948
265 | Billie Holiday | Let's Call the Whole Thing Off | 1937
265 | Robert Johnson | Preachin' Blues | 1939
265 | Mississippi Sheiks | Sitting on Top of the World | 1930
265 | Béla Bartók | String Quartet No. 4: I. Allegro | 1928
272 | Osvaldo Fresedo // Carlos Gardel | La cumparsita | 1924
273 | Sergei Rachmaninoff | Piano Concerto No. 2 in C minor: I. Moderato | 1901
274 | Dick Justice | Cocaine | 1929
275 | "Popular" sung by the Spanish Republican troops and the International Brigades during the Spanish Civil War | Ay Carmela! | 1930's
275 | Fats Waller | Handful of Keys | 1929
275 | Charlie Johnson | The Boy In The Boat (The Rock) | 1928
278 | Maurice Ravel | String Quartet in F Major: II. Assez vif – très rythmé | 1904
279 | Sergei Prokofiev | Peter and the Wolf: The Story Begins (Peter's Theme) | 1936
280 | Michalis Patrinos | Misirlou | 1930
281 | Marion Harris | I'm a Jazz Vampire | 1920
281 | Woody Guthrie | Jarama Valley | 1944
281 | Lucienne Delyle | Je suis seule ce soir | 1947
281 | Robert Johnson | Kindhearted Woman Blues | 1937
281 | Scott Joplin | Stoptime Rag | 1910
281 | Arnold Schoenberg | Variations for Orchestra: IX: L'istesso Tempo | 1928
281 | Roy Acuff and His Smoky Mountain Boys | Wreck on the Highway | 1942
288 | Charley Patton | High Water Everywhere | 1930
289 | Casey Bill Weldon | You Just As Well Let Her Go | 1936
290 | Charles Trénet // Lucienne Boyer | ¿Que Reste-t'il de nos amours ? | 1942
291 | Blind Willie Johnson | John The Revelator | 1930
292 | Hot Lips Page | Harlem Rumbain' The Blues | 1940
293 | Ella Fitzgerald & The Mills Brothers | It's Only a Paper Moon | 1945
294 | Lightnin' Hopkins | Fast Life Woman | 1949
295 | The Monroe Brothers | Bringing In The Georgia Mail | 1936
295 | Max Schmeling, Kurt Gerron, Hugo Fischer-Köppe | Das Herz eines Boxers | 1930
295 | Nat King Cole Trio | It Only Happens Once | 1945
295 | Federico García Lorca | La Argentinita: Los cuatro muleros | 1931
295 | The Monroe Brothers | Nine Pound Hammer Is Too Heavy | 1936
300 | Tommy Dorsey & His Orchestra with Jack Leonard | All the Things You Are | 1939
301 | Duke Ellington | Black and Tan Fantasy | 1927
302 | George Gershwin | An American in Paris | 1928
303 | Cleoma & Ophy Breaux w/ Joe Falcon | C'est si triste sans lui | 1929
303 | Blind Willie Dunn's Gin Bottle Four F/ Lonnie Johnson & Eddie Lang | Guitar Blues | 1929
303 | Sergei Rachmaninoff | Isle of the Dead | 1908
303 | Blind Willie Johnson | Mother's Children Have a Hard Time | 1928
303 | Fats Domino | The Fat Man | 1949
308 | John Bhengu | Umakotshasha | 1948
309 | Enrico Caruso | Vesti la giubba | 1907
310 | Machito | ¿Quién Para La Rumba? | 1943
310 | Darius Milhaud | Scaramouche, suite for two pianos: III. Brazileira | 1937
310 | Ernst Busch | Solidaritätslied | 1931
310 | A.A. Gray & Seven-Foot Dilly | The Old Ark's A' Moving | 1930
310 | Billie Holiday | They Can't Take That Away From Me | 1937
315 | Al Jolson // Harry James - 1941 | You Made Me Love You (I Didn't Want to Do It) | 1913
316 | Miles Davis | Milestones | 1948
317 | Clarence Ashley | The House Carpenter | 1930
318 | Béla Bartók | Concerto for Orchestra: V. Finale | 1943
319 | Blind Willie Johnson | It's Nobody's Fault but Mine | 1927
319 | Charlie Parker | Parker's Mood | 1948
319 | Thelonious Monk Trio | Ruby My Dear | 1947
322 | Tommy Dorsey // Louis Armstrong | I'm In the Mood For Love | 1935
323 | José López Alavéz | Canción mixteca | 1915
324 | Xavier Cugat & His Waldorf Astoria Orchestra | Perfidia | 1940
325 | Glenn Miller and His Orchestra | Indian Summer | 1939
325 | John Taylor | Speed The Plow Reel | 1906
325 | Charles Ives | Three Places in New England: II. Putnam's Camp, Redding, Connecticut | 1931
328 | Remo Giazotto | Adagio In G Minor (Albinoni) | 1945
328 | Manuel de Falla | Canción del amor dolido | 1915
328 | Patsy Touhey | Drowsy Maggie | 1921
328 | Sergei Rachmaninoff | Piano Concerto No. 2 in C minor: III. Allegro scherzando | 1901
328 | Dizzy Gillespie | Shaw 'Nuff | 1945
328 | Original Dixieland Jazz Band | Soudan | 1920
334 | Roy Smeck | Twelfth Street Rag | 1931
335 | John Lee Hooker | Crawlin' King Snake | 1949
335 | Jimmie Lunceford and His Chickasaw Syncopators | In Dat Mornin' | 1930
335 | Maurice Ravel | Piano Concerto in G major: I. Allagremente | 1931
335 | Nat King Cole | These Foolish Things | ????
335 | Jean Sablon | Vous qui passez sans me voir | 1936
340 | Charley Patton // Son House - 1942 | Pony Blues | 1929
341 | Jelly Roll Morton's Red Hot Peppers | Black Bottom Stomp | 1926
342 | Bessie Smith & Her Blue Boys | Alexander's Ragtime Band | 1927
342 | Glenn Miller and His Orchestra | American Patrol | 1942
342 | Igor Stravinsky/Leonard Bernstein | Octet for Wind Instruments: Tema con variazioni | 1923
345 | Thelonious Monk Quintet | In Walked Bud | 1947
346 | Mary Lou Williams | Aries | 1945
346 | Manuel Penella | El gato montés | 1916
346 | Robert Johnson | From Four Till Late | 1937
346 | Art Hickman's Orchestra | Hokum | 1921
346 | Fréhel | Où sont tous mes amants? | 1935
346 | Nat King Cole | Rosetta | 1939
346 | Bessie Smith | T Ain't Nobody's Bizness If I Do | 1923
346 | Gene Autry and Jimmy Long | That Silver-Haired Daddy of Mine | 1935
346 | Henry Cowell | The Banshee | 1925
346 | Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov | The Tale of Tsar Saltan: Flight of the Bumblebee | 1900
356 | Hank Williams and His Drifting Cowboys | Honky Tonkin’ | 1947
356 | Sister Mary Nelson | Judgement | 1927
356 | Oscar Aleman | Tico Tico No Fuba | 1943
359 | Sister Rosetta Tharpe & Marie Knight | Up Above My Head, I Hear Music in the Air | 1948
360 | Blind Lemon Jefferson | See That My Grave Is Kept Clean | 1927
361 | Glenn Miller and His Orchestra | A String of Pearls | 1941
361 | Nat King Cole | I Used to Love You (But It's All Over Now) | 1949
361 | Richard Strauss | Marie Theres'! Hab' mir's gelobt from Der Rosenkavalier | 1910
361 | Washington Phillips | Mother's Last Word to Her Son | 1927
361 | Béla Bartók | Piano Concerto No. 2: I. Allegro | 1931
361 | Rex Stewart and His Orchestra | Sacknasty | 1948
361 | Glenn Miller and His Orchestra | Tuxedo Junction | 1940
368 | Bascom Lamar Lunsford | I Wish I Was a Mole in the Ground | 1928
369 | Ray Ventura | ¿Qu'est-ce qu'on attend pour être heureux ? | 1937
369 | Big Maceo | Country Jail Blues | 1941
369 | Bill Monroe | It's Mighty Dark to Travel | 1948
369 | Blind Willie Johnson | Nobody's Fault But Mine | 1928
373 | Edgard Varèse | Ionisation | 1933
374 | Nat King Cole | Boogie a La King | 1944
374 | The Stanley Brothers | Little Maggie | 1947
374 | Kokomo Arnold | Milk Cow Blues | 1934
374 | Gustav Mahler | Symphony No. 9 in D minor: I. Andante comodo | 1910
378 | Cab Calloway | (Hep-Hep!) The Jumpin' Jive | 1939
378 | T-Bone Walker | Call It Stormy Monday (But Tuesday's Just As Bad) | 1947
378 | William H. Reitz | Circus Life Gallop | 1909
378 | Artie Shaw and His Orchestra | Frenesi | 1940
378 | Arthur "Big Boy" Cruddup | That's All Right | 1947
383 | Sergei Rachmaninoff | Piano Concerto No. 3: I. Allegro ma non tanto | 1909
384 | Ethel Merman & Ray Middleton | Anything You Can Do | 1946
384 | Matt Keefe | Roll On, Silvery Moon | 1917
384 | Giacomo Puccini | Un bel dì vedremo from "Madama Butterfly" | 1904
387 | Clarence "Tom" Ashley | The Coo Coo Bird | 1929
388 | Glenn Miller | Blueberry Hill | 1940
388 | Duke Ellington and His Famous Orchestra | Come Sunday | 1945
388 | Franz Lehár | Dein ist mein ganzes Herz from The Land of Smiles | 1929
388 | Cecil Gant | I Wonder | 1944
388 | Ken Maynard | The Lone Star Trail | 1930
393 | Woody Guthrie | Pretty Boy Floyd | 1945
394 | Mistinguett | Mon homme | 1916
395 | Howard McGhee Quintett | Be-Bop | 1946
395 | Miles Davis | Move | 1949
395 | George J. Gaskin & Joe Belmont | The Whip-Poor Will Song | 1903
398 | Bing Crosby | Pennies From Heaven | 1936
399 | Dmitri Shostakovich | Symphony No. 5: IV. Allegro non troppo | 1937
400 | Charles Ives | Symphony No. 4, II. Comedy | 1916
401 | Wendo Kolosoy | Marie-Louise | 1948
402 | Memphis Minnie | Can I Do It For You? | 1930
402 | Dallas String Band | Dallas Rag | 1927
402 | Tommy Dorsey and His Orchestra with Frank Sinatra | Fools Rush In (Where Angels Fear To Tread) | 1940
402 | Léo Daniderff | Je cherche après Titine | 1917
402 | Blind Sammie | Southern Can Is Mine | 1931
407 | Les Paul | Brazil | 1948
408 | Benny Goodman & His Orchestra with Martha Tilton and Ziggy | And the Angels Sing | 1939
408 | Jelly Roll Morton's Red Hot Peppers | Original Jelly Roll Blues | 1926
408 | Louis Armstrong | Struttin' with Some Barbeque | 1927
411 | Golden Gate Jubilee Quartet // Louis Armstrong | When the Saints Go Marchin' In | 1932
412 | Tommy McClennan | Deep Blue Sea Blues | 1941
412 | Django Reinhardt | Django's Tiger | 1946
412 | Dizzy Gillespie | Groovin' High | 1945
412 | Kate Smith | He's Got the Whole World In His Hands | ????
412 | Carlos Gardel | Melodía de arrabal | 1933
417 | Blind Mamie Forehand | Honey In The Rock | 1927
418 | Merle Travis | Sixteen Tons | 1947
419 | Duke Ellington | Ko-Ko | 1940
419 | Stan Kenton and His Orchestra | Artistry in Bolero | 1946
419 | Billie Holiday | Billie's Blues (I Love My Man) | 1936
419 | Chauncey Olcott | When Irish Eyes Are Smiling | 1913
423 | Nat King Cole | (I Love You) For Sentimental Reasons | 1946
423 | Charles Brown | Driftin' Blues | 1945
423 | Carlos Gardel | La cieguita | 1928
423 | The Peerless Quartet | Let Me Call You Sweetheart | 1911
423 | Charles Ives | The Unanswered Question | 1941
428 | Mamie Smith | Crazy Blues | 1920
429 | Carl Orff | Gassenhauer | 1935
429 | John Lee Sonny Boy Williamson | Good Morning Little Schoolgirl | 1937
429 | Louis Armstrong & His Sebastian New Cotton Club Orchestra | Just a Gigolo | 1931
429 | Jean Lumière | La valse au village | 1939
429 | Nora Bayes | Over There | 1917
429 | Jean Sibelius | Symphony No. 7 | 1924
429 | Cal Stewart | Ticklish Rueben | 1902
436 | Anna Marly | Le chant des partisans | 1943
436 | Big Bill | Mississippi River Blues | 1934
436 | Louis Armstrong | Potato Head Blues | 1927
436 | George Gershwin | Prelude nº 2 | 1926
436 | Mississippi John Hurt | Spike Driver Blues | 1928
436 | Lucienne Delyle | Sur Les Quais Du Vieux Paris | 1939
442 | Frankie Trumbauer | Singin' the Blues | 1927
443 | Dieuzy's Dixieland Band | Dixieland Daddy | 1942
443 | John Lee Hooker | Hobo Blues | 1949
443 | Lucienne Delyle | Mon amant de Saint-Jean | 1942
443 | Scott Joplin | Solace | 1909
443 | Charles Brown | Trouble Blues | 1949
443 | Naftule Brandwein | Vi Tsvey Iz Naftule Der Driter | 1923
449 | Billie Holiday | Big Stuff | 1945
449 | Nat King Cole | Early Morning Blues | 1941
449 | Santiago Lope Gonzalo | Gallito | 1904
449 | Duke Ellington | I Got It Bad and That Ain't Good | 1941
449 | Smilin' Smokey Lynn | Run. Mister Rabbit, Run | 1949
449 | Fanny Brice | Second Hand Rose | 1922
449 | Big Jay McNeely | The Deacon's Hop | 1949
449 | Charles Trenet | Y'a d'la joie ! | 1936
457 | Florelle | Fascination | 1933
457 | Ella Fitzgerald | Guilty | 1947
457 | Django Reinhardt | I Saw Stars | 1934
457 | Jazz Gillum | Key To The Highway | 1940
457 | Ernst Busch | Roter Wedding | 1929
462 | Amos Milburn | Down the Road Apiece | 1946
463 | Pee Wee Crayton | Blues After Hours | 1948
463 | Zez Confrey and His Orchestra | Dizzy Fingers | 1923
463 | Duke Ellington and His Orchestra | I'm Beginning To See The Light | 1945
463 | Edith Piaf | Mon Légionnaire | 1947
463 | Tommy Dorsey | Opus One | 1944
463 | Arnold Schoenberg | Piano Concerto | 1942
463 | Dinah Shore | You'd Be So Nice To Come Home To | 1942
470 | Mahalia Jackson | Amazing Grace | 1947
470 | Glenn Miller | Elmer's Tune | 1941
470 | Lightnin' Hopkins | Goin' Back and Talk to Mama (Going Home Blues) | 1949
470 | Bunny Berigan | I Can't Get Started | 1936
470 | Constantin le Rieur | La rigolomanie | 1932
470 | Anton Webern | Symphony, Op. 21 | 1928
476 | Charlie Parker // Oscar Peterson | I Got Rhythm | 1945
477 | Paul Robeson | Ol' Man River | 1928
478 | Marion Harris // Betty Hutton | It Had to Be You | 1924
479 | T. Bone Walker | I Got a Break Baby | 1945
479 | Al Jolson | My Mammy | 1928
479 | Al Dexter | Pistol Packin' Mama | 1943
479 | Artie Shaw and His Orchestra | The Chant | 1937
479 | Vera Hall | Trouble So Hard | 1937
479 | Alban Berg | Violin Concerto: I. Andante / Allegretto | 1935
485 | Victoria Spivey | Dope Head Blues | 1928
485 | Duke Ellington and His Famous Orchestra | Harlem Air Shaft | 1940
485 | Lizzie Miles | I Hate A Man Like You | 1930
485 | Charles Trenet | Je chante | 1937
485 | Jelly Roll Morton | King Porter Stomp | 1926
490 | Eubie Blake | Charleston Rag | 1915
490 | Amália Rodrigues | Fado do ciúme | 1945
490 | Blind Blake | Georgia Bound | 1929
490 | Slam Stewart | Play Fiddle Play | 1945
490 | Walter Jacobs and Carter Brothers | The Jazz Fiddler | 1930
495 | Leadbelly | Ella Speed | 1944
495 | Sonny Terry | Foxchase | 1945
495 | Helen Kane | I Wanna Be Loved By You | 1928
495 | Harry Revel, Les Baxter & Dr. Samuel Hoffman | Lunar Rhapsody | 1947
495 | Trio Ariquipeño de Quenas | Planta del Desierto | 1917
495 | Mireille et Jean Sablon | Puisque vous partez en voyage | 1936
495 | The Mills Brothers | You Always Hurt the Ones You Love | 1944
502 | The Carter Family | Keep on the Sunny Side | 1928
503 | Al Bernard & Frank Kamplain | 31st Street Blues | 1923
503 | Francis Lemarque | À Paris | ????
503 | Alberto Ginastera | Danzas Argentinas: II. Danza de la moza donosa | 1937
503 | Bennie Moten | Moten's Swing | 1933
503 | Ralph Vaughan Williams | The Lark Ascending | 1921
503 | Amédé Ardoin | Two Step De Eunice | 1929
503 | Son House | Walking Blues | 1941
510 | Django Reinhardt & Stephane Grapelli | Daphné | 1938
510 | Charles Trénet | Douce France | 1947
510 | Tex Williams | I Got Texas In My Soul | 1946
510 | Tommy Dorsey with Frank Sinatra | Let's Get Away From It All | 1941
510 | Stuff Smith | Old Joe's Hittin' The Jug | 1936
510 | Arnold Schoenberg | String Quartet No. 3: I. Moderato | 1926
516 | Carlos Gardel | Adiós, muchachos | 1927
516 | Fréhel | La java bleue | 1940
516 | Joseph C. Smith's Orchestra | The Vamp | 1919
519 | The Cats and the Fiddle | I Miss You So | 1940
519 | Maurice Chevalier | Prosper | 1935
519 | Wingy Manone and His Orchestra | You Let Me Down | 1935
522 | Dave Tarras | Hirah/Hasireiner | 1944
522 | Ella Fitzgerald and Her Savoy Eight | It’s Wonderful | 1938
522 | Henry Hall | Teddy Bear's Picnic | 1932
522 | James "Stump" Johnson | The Duck Yas-Yas-Yas | 1929
526 | Joséphine Baker | J'ai deux amours | 1931
527 | Stan Kenton and His Orchestra | Artistry in Rhythm | 1944
527 | Tommy Dorsey with Frank Sinatra & The Pied Pipers | I'll Never Smile Again | 1940
527 | Louis Jordan and His Tympany Five | Jack You’re Dead | 1947
527 | Blind Boy Fuller | Rag, Mama, Rag | 1936
527 | Leos Janáček | String Quartet No. 2 "Intimate Letters": III. Andante - Adagio | 1928
527 | T-Bone Walker | T-Bone Shuffle | 1949
533 | Sol Hoppii & His Novelty Quartette | Hula Girl | 1933
534 | Amédé Ardoin | Aimez moi ce soir | 1930
534 | Trio Lescano | La canzone delle mosche | 1936
534 | Leroy Carr & Scrapper Blackwell | Midnight Hour Blues | 1932
534 | Gene Autry | Rudolph, the Red-Nosed Reindeer | 1949
534 | The Andrews Sisters | Say "Si Si" | 1940
539 | Bing Crosby | Brother, Can You Spare a Dime | 1932
540 | George Formby | Leaning on a Lamp Post | 1937
540 | George Gershwin | Prelude nº 1 | 1926
540 | Don Byas | Riffin' And Jivin' | 1944
540 | Haydn Quartet w/ Billy Murray | Take Me Out To the Ball Game | 1908
540 | Béla Bartók | The Miraculous Mandarin | 1926
545 | Lecuona Cuban Boys | Amapola | 1935
545 | Arthur Pryor | Canhanibalmo Rag | 1911
545 | Django Reinhardt | Dinah | 1934
545 | Blind Alfred Reed | How Can a Poor Man Stand Such Times and Live | 1929
545 | Alexander Scriabin | Le poème de l'extase | 1907
545 | Aaron Copland | Simple Gifts from Appalachian Spring | 1944
545 | John Cage | Suite for Toy Piano: Movement I | 1948
552 | Xavier Cugat and His Orchestra with Carmen Castillo | Amor | 1944
552 | The Pied Pipers | Dream | 1945
552 | Bascom Lamar Lunsford | Dry Bones | 1928
552 | Atilla the Hun | Mr. Nankivell's Speech | 1928
552 | Ottorino Respighi | Pines of Rome: no. 1, Pines of the Villa Borghese | 1924
557 | Glenn Miller | (I’ve Got a Gal in) Kalamazoo | 1942
557 | Louis Jordan and His Tympany Five | Beans And Cornbread | 1949
557 | Woody Herman | Golden Wedding | 1940
557 | Ruth Etting | Love Me or Leave Me | 1929
561 | Eddie Cantor | Makin' Whoopee | 1929
562 | Claude Debussy | Charlie's Corner: IV. The Snow is Dancing | 1908
562 | Lovie Austin | Mojo Blues | 1924
562 | Charlie Chaplin | Nonsense Song | 1936
562 | Al Jolson | Rock-A-Bye Your Baby With A Dixie Melody | 1918
562 | Lil Green | Romance in the Dark | 1940
562 | Yao Lee | Rose, Rose, I Love You | 1940
568 | Édith Piaf | Les trois cloches | 1946
569 | Celina y Reutilio | A Santa Bárbara | 1949
569 | Yves Montand | Bal, petit bal | ????
569 | Lee Wiley | But Not for Me | 1947
569 | Bing Crosby & The Andrews Sisters | Don't Fence Me In | 1944
569 | Sergei Prokofiev | Piano Concerto No. 2 in G minor: IV. Finale: Allegro tempestoso | 1923
569 | Woody Guthrie | Tom Joad, Parts 1 & 2 | 1940
575 | The Carter Family | Engine 143 | 1927
575 | Texas Alexander | Levee Camp Moan Blues | 1927
575 | Hank Williams and His Drifting Cowboys | My Bucket's Got A Hole In It | 1949
575 | Charlie Poole with the North Carolina Ramblers | There'll Come a Time | 1926
579 | Heitor Villa-Lobos | Bachianas Brasileiras no.5: Aria (Cantilena) | 1938
579 | Annette Hanshaw | Happy Days Are Here Again | 1930
579 | Arthur Honegger | Pacific 231 | 1923
579 | The Southern Sons Quartet | Praise The Lord And Pass The Ammunition | 1942
579 | Vernon Dalhart | The Wreck of the Old 97 | 1924
579 | The Sons of the Pioneers | Tumbling Tumbleweeds | 1934
585 | The Ink Spots | I Don't Want To Set the World On Fire | 1941
585 | Little Miss Cornshucks | So Long | 1946
585 | Charles Penrose | The Laughing Policeman | 1922
585 | Leonard Bernstein | West Side Story: Symphonic Dances, Mambo | 1957
589 | American Quartet feat. Billy Murray | Casey Jones | 1910
589 | Henri Garat | C'est un mauvais garçon | 1931
589 | King Oliver | Dipper Mouth Blues | 1923
589 | Duke Ellington's Orchestra | Haunted Nights | 1929
589 | Tampa Red | It Hurts Me Too | 1941
589 | Amália Rodrigues | Troca De Olhares | 1945
595 | The Caresser | Edward The VIII | 1937
595 | Agustín Lara | Granada | 1932
595 | Roaring Lion with Cyril Monrose String Orchestra | Jonah, Come Out Of The Wilderness | 1939
595 | Lightnin' Hopkins | Katie Mae Blues | 1947
595 | Ella Fitzgerald | That’s My Desire | 1947
595 | Billy Murray | The Grand Old Rag (You’re a Grand Old Flag) | 1906
601 | Yao Lee | 得不到的爱情 (I Can't Have Your Love) | 1940
601 | The Texas Blue Destroyers | Down In The Mouth | 1924
601 | Jimmie Rodgers | In the Jailhouse Now | 1928
601 | Olivier Messiaen | Vingt regards sur l'enfant-Jésus: Noel | 1944
605 | Mireille | Ce petit chemin | 1929
605 | Gene Krupa | Drum Boogie | 1941
605 | Harry Choates | Jole Blon | 1946
605 | Irving Aaronson | Let's Misbehave | 1928
605 | Umm Kulthum | Salou Qalbi | 1946
605 | Ma Rainey | See See Rider Blues | 1925
605 | Sergei Prokofiev | Symphony No. 5 in B flat major, Op. 100: II. Allegro marcato | 1944
605 | Woody Guthrie | Vigilante Man | 1940
613 | Ray Noble and His Orchestra | It's All Forgotten Now | 1934
613 | Leadbelly | Rock Island Line | 1937
613 | Igor Stravinsky | Symphony of Psalms: II. Expectans expectavi dominum | 1930
613 | Kokomo Arnold | The Twelves | 1935
613 | Uncle Dave Macon | Way Down The Old Plank Road | 1926
618 | Merle Travis | Dark as a Dungeon | 1946
618 | Marian Anderson | Franz Schubert's Ave Maria | 1936
618 | Gustav Mahler | Symphony No. 4 in G Major: IV. Sehr behaglich | 1901
618 | Arthur Collins | The Preacher And The Bear | 1905
622 | Woody Herman | (At the) Woodchopper's Ball | 1939
622 | Glahe Musette Orchestra | Beer Barrel-Polka | 1939
622 | Blind Blake | C.C. Pill Blues | 1928
622 | Harry C. Browne | Carve Dat Possum | 1917
622 | Woody Guthrie | I Ain't Got No Home in This World Anymore | 1940
622 | Glenn Miller and His Orchestra | Little Brown Jug | 1939
622 | Les Brown & Doris Day | My Dreams are Getting Better All the Time | 1945
622 | Orchestre symphonique (of Paris) / Julius Ehrlich | Steel Foundry | 1934
622 | Xian Xinghai | Yellow River Cantata: Prelude (The Song of the Yellow River Boatman)" | 1939
631 | Johnny Mercer | Ac-cent-tchu-ate the Positive | 1944
631 | Big Bill Broonzy | All By Myself | 1941
631 | Sara Martin | Atlanta Blues | 1923
631 | Richard Strauss | Dance of the Seven Veils | 1905
631 | Benjamin Britten | Peter Grimes: Four Sea Interludes, Sunday Morning | 1943
631 | Frank Sinatra | Someone To Watch Over Me | 1945
631 | Buell Kazee | The Wagoner's Lad (Loving Nancy) | 1928
631 | Harry Marlow | When Tommy Comes Marching Home | 1914
639 | George Lewis | Burgundy Street Blues | 1944
639 | Nelstone's Hawaiians | Fatal Flower Garden | 1930
639 | Roy Eldridge | Minor Jive | 1943
639 | DeFord Bailey | Pan-American Blues | 1927
639 | Spike Jones | William Tell Overture | 1948
644 | Mukhtar Begum | Chori Kaheen Khuley Na | 1938
644 | Victoria Spivey | Dirty T.B. Blues | 1929
644 | Mississippi John Hurt | Louis Collins | 1928
644 | Rita Hayworth | Put the Blame on Mame | 1946
644 | Paul Williams & His Hucklebuckers | The Huckle-Buck | 1949
649 | Charlie Parker | Blue Bird | 1949
649 | Eddie Head & His Family | Down On Me | 1930
649 | Bill Monroe and His Bluegrass Boys | Molly & Tenbrooks | 1949
649 | Heitor Villa-Lobos | Prelude No. 1 in E minor | 1940
649 | Charlie Chaplin | Titine (From 'Modern Times') | 1936
654 | Al Bernard | Brother Low Down | 1922
654 | Manuel de Falla | Danza ritual del fuego: El amore brujo | 1916
654 | Arthur "Big Boy" Crudup | Dirt Road Blues | 1948
654 | Lucille Bogan | Man Stealer Blues | 1935
654 | Gustavo Pascual Falcó | Paquito el chocolatero | 1937
654 | Rina Ketty | Plaisir d'amour | 1939
654 | Glenn Miller and His Orchestra | Serenade in Blue | 1942
654 | Robert Johnson | Terraplane Blues | 1936
654 | Billie Holiday | Them There Eyes | 1939
654 | Comedian Harmonists | Veronika, der Lenz ist da | 1930
654 | Yma Sumac | Virgenes del sol | 1944
654 | Ernest Tubb | Walking The Floor Over You | 1941
654 | Alfred G. Carnes | We Shall All Be Reunited | 1928
667 | Kelly Harrell | Charles Guiteau | 1927
667 | Woody Guthrie | Do Re Mi | 1940
667 | Mariachi Vargas de Tecalitlán | El son de la negra | 1926
667 | Thelonious Monk | Epistrophy | 1948
667 | Bill Monroe and His Bluegrass Boys | Mule Skinner Blues | 1940
667 | Clarence Williams | Trouble | 1934
667 | Marjanovic i Ribarevic | Turski Mars | 1912
674 | William Walton | Façade, Suite No. 2: V. Popular Song | 1938
674 | Modiseng and Tswana Men | Godumaduma Gwa Mosadi | 1948
674 | Claude Debussy | La cathédrale engloutie [The Submerged Cathedral] | 1910
674 | Guillermo Buitrago | La gota fría | 1938
674 | Beniamino Gigli | Torna a Surriento | 1936
674 | Cole Porter | You’re the Top | 1934
680 | Mississippi John Hurt | Frankie | 1928
680 | Gaston Ouvrard | Je ne suis pas bien portant | 1932
680 | Naftule Brandwein | Nifty's Freilach | 1941
680 | John Cage | Sonatas I-IV for prepared piano | 1948
680 | Jean Sibelius | Symphony No. 5 in E-flat major, Op. 82: 3rd movement | 1919
680 | Joe Belmont | The Mockingbird | 1908
680 | Richard Strauss | Vier letzte Lieder (Four Last Songs): IV. Im Abendrot | 1948
687 | Blind Willie Johnson | Lord I Just Can't Keep From Crying | 1928
687 | Henry Thomas | Old Country Stomp | 1928
687 | Sonny Greer | Saturday Night Function | 1929
690 | F. J. Ricketts | Colonel Bogey March | 1916
690 | The Andrews Sisters | Don't Sit Under the Apple Tree (With Anyone Else but Me) | 1942
690 | The Ink Spots & Ella Fitzgerald | Into Each Life Some Rain Must Fall | 1944
690 | Lester Flatt & Earl Scruggs | My Cabin in Caroline | 1949
690 | Spike Jones | The Glow Worm | 1946
695 | Harry Choates | Devil In The Bayou | 1946
695 | Leroy Carr | How Long, How Long Blues | 1928
695 | Raymond Scott Quintette | Powerhouse | 1937
695 | Zhou Xuan | Tianya genü (The Wandering Songstress) | 1937
695 | Kansas Joe & Memphis Minnie | When the Levee Breaks | 1929
700 | Hank Williams | (Last Night) I Heard You Crying In Your Sleep | 1947
700 | Lata Mangeshkar | Aayega aanewala | 1949
700 | Dock Boggs | Country Blues | 1927
700 | Washington Phillips | I Am Born To Preach The Gospel | 1929
700 | Roane County Ramblers | Southern No. 111 | 1928 | 1928
700 | Fletcher Henderson | Sugar Foot Stomp | 1925
700 | Vernon Dalhart | The Prisoner's Song | 1925
707 | Dmitry Kabalevsky | Comedians' Galop from The Comedians | 1940
707 | Dexter Gordon | Dexter Rides Again | 1946
707 | Billy Murray | K-K-K-Katy | 1918
710 | Fred Astaire | A Foggy Day | 1937
710 | Robert Nighthawk | Black Angel Blues | 1949
710 | Billy Murray | Can You Tame Wild Wimmen? | 1918
710 | Béla Bartók | Concerto for Orchestra, Sz. 116/BB 123: 4th movement, Intermezzo interrotto" | 1944
710 | Tex Williams | Smoke! Smoke! Smoke! (That Cigarette) | 1947
710 | Sister Rosetta Tharpe | This Train | 1939
716 | Billie Holiday | All of Me | 1941
716 | Fred Van Eps | Medley Of Southern Melodies | 1916
716 | Louis Armstrong Hot Five | Once in a While | 1928
716 | Flanagan & Allen | The Siegfried Line | 1939
716 | Ray Ventura | Tout va tres bien Madame la Marquise | 1935
716 | Gus Cannon's Jug Stompers | Walk Right In | 1929
716 | Chick Webb and His Orchestra w/ Ella Fitzgerald | When I Get Low, I Get High | 1937
723 | Billie Holiday | Fine and Mellow | 1939
723 | Eduardo Brito | Lamento Esclavo | 1930
723 | Damia | Les Goélands | 1948
726 | Todd Duncan | It Ain’t Necessarily So | 1942
726 | Uncle Dave Macon | Keep My Skillet Good and Greasy | 1924
726 | Paul Robeson | Nobody Knows the Trouble I've Seen | 1946
726 | Bernard Hermann | Overture to Citizen Kane | 1941
726 | Clarence "Pine Top" Smith | Pine Top's Boogie Woogie | 1928
726 | Vassilis Tsitsanis | Sinefiasmeni Kiriaki | 1948
726 | Robert Wilkins | That's No Way To Get Along | 1929
726 | Bix Beiderbecke | Wringin' and Twistin' | 1927
734 | Gene Austin | Ain't She Sweet | 1927
734 | Antonio Mairena | Como reluce Triana | 1941
734 | Benny Goodman | Don't Be That Way | 1938
734 | Willy Derby | Het Fiere Schooiershart | 1919
734 | Pearl Dickson | Little Rock Blues | 1927
734 | King Radio | Matilda | 1939
734 | Hank Williams | On the Banks of the Old Pontchartrain | 1947
734 | Lucienne Delyle | Sous les ponts de Paris | 1949
734 | Bob Wills and His Texas Playboys | Who Walks In When I Walk Out? | 1936
743 | Freddy Martin | April in Paris | 1934
743 | Nat King Cole | D-Day | 1944
743 | The Boswell Sisters | Everybody Loves My Baby (But My Baby Don't Love Nobody but Me) | 1932
743 | Adriana Caselotti | Someday My Prince Will Come | 1937
747 | Tommy Johnson | Cool Drink Of Water | 1928
747 | Peter DeRose | Deep Purple | 1933
747 | Arnold Schoenberg | Fünf Orchesterstücke (Five Orchestral Pieces): III. Farben | 1909
747 | Marlene Dietrich | Ich bin von Kopf bis Fuß auf Liebe eingestellt | 1930
747 | Charles Harrison | I'm Always Chasing Rainbows | 1918
747 | Bert Williams | Nobody | 1905
747 | Jo Stafford | Some Enchanted Evening | 1949

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Dexter
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Re: AMF 1900-1949 Song Poll Results

Postby Dexter » Mon Dec 19, 2016 8:03 am

Thanks for the full list DaveC, lots of digging for new nuggets to last me 'til Februrary.

Henry
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Re: AMF 1900-1949 Song Poll Results

Postby Henry » Mon Dec 19, 2016 9:25 pm

Great job DaveC. I very much appreciate the full list and wondered if there was a problem with the song I selected as my 59th favorite - Scott Hamilton's "A Nightingale Sang in Berkeley Square" (1942).

Also, please note the years I have for the following songs:

335 | Nat King Cole | These Foolish Things (1947)
412 | Kate Smith | He's Got the Whole World In His Hands (1920)

jamieW
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Re: AMF 1900-1949 Song Poll Results

Postby jamieW » Mon Dec 19, 2016 11:08 pm

Henry wrote:Great job DaveC. I very much appreciate the full list and wondered if there was a problem with the song I selected as my 59th favorite - Scott Hamilton's "A Nightingale Sang in Berkeley Square" (1942).

Also, please note the years I have for the following songs:

335 | Nat King Cole | These Foolish Things (1947)
412 | Kate Smith | He's Got the Whole World In His Hands (1920)


Henry, I was the one who researched the release years. I will look into this further, but if I remember right, I think all of these were versions recorded after 1949. For the 1900-49 poll, the version selected needed to be recorded within these years. (I apologize if this wasn't clear.) Please let me know if I'm mistaken about any of these.

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Honorio
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Location: L'Eliana, Valencia, Spain

Re: AMF 1900-1949 Song Poll Results

Postby Honorio » Mon Dec 26, 2016 8:41 pm

Hi jamieW and DaveC: sorry for lasting that long in praising your show. I was busy with work and family (and also with the Leonard Cohen poll) and I wanted to include along with my comment a Spotify playlist with the 1900-1949 Top 100. You did a fantastic job compiling the list and posting the results (the presentation was brilliant, I liked a lot the pictures and quotes). About the list I must say that I missed a lot some of the songs dropping out of the Top 100 of the 2010 poll (Seeräuber Jenny, Money Is King, Mano a mano, It's Too Soon to Know, Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta, Canción del fuego fatuo or Suite for Jazz Orchestra to name a few) but the new entries are also worthy.

Here's the playlist. Like I did with my own playlists I've included the first recording of the Classical works (if available). So you can listen there to Sergei Prokofiev or Maurice Ravel themselves conducting the first recordings of "Romeo and Juliet Suite No.2" or "Boléro," and to Sergei Rachmaninoff playing the piano part of his own "Piano Concert No.2." The sound quality is obviously lower than in posterior recordings but, beside the historical importance, the contrast with the original recordings of other styles on the playlist is not too striking. But in some cases (Debussy's "Clair de Lune" for instance) I could find information on Internet about which was the first recording.



On a couple of weeks (I won't be able to do it next week because I'm going to Venice to enjoy there the New Year's Eve) I'll post the Spotify list for 1950-1959.

jamieW
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Re: AMF 1900-1949 Song Poll Results

Postby jamieW » Mon Dec 26, 2016 11:20 pm

Thanks so much for the Spotify playlist, Honorio! And thank you, too, for all the information you provided in the original poll that helped immensely (especially me with release dates and DaveC with the great comments in the presentation). I'm really hoping there will be future interest in reviving this poll years down the road, but I'm somewhat pessimistic. I often feel like a dinosaur, soon to be extinct, with my love of pre-1960's music. I've noticed a lot of the younger forum members love old films, so I'm not sure why that doesn't translate to the music that is the roots of all that they love. But we all have different tastes and enjoy what we enjoy. I'm just thankful that I do love this era - I can't imagine my life without hundreds of these great songs and compositions! They only help me to appreciate what would come later all the more.


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