AMF 1950s Song Poll Results

DaveC
Die Mensch Maschine
Posts: 1147
Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2013 12:04 am

AMF 1950s Song Poll Results

Postby DaveC » Tue Nov 29, 2016 6:32 pm




16 voters voted for 654 different songs.

Number of songs in the AMF top 100 not ranked on AM: 17 (of which 2 are classical)

Highest ranking for a song not in AM: 42

Number of new entries (c.f. 2010 poll): 36

Highest new entry: 16

Songs dropping out of top 100:

2016..................2010....Song
Rank..................Rank

Moved to 00-49......58......Professor Longhair-Mardi Gras in New Orleans
Moved to 00-49......28......Lester Flatt & Earl Scruggs-Foggy Mountain Breakdown
No votes..............77......Ray Charles-Mess Around
No votes..............90......Fats Domino-Going to the River
No votes..............94......John Cage-4'33''
No votes..............98......Webb Pierce-There Stands the Glass
No votes..............100.....Nat King Cole-Mona Lisa
652....................89......Professor Longhair-Tipitina
641....................95......Hank Williams-Cold, Cold Heart
545....................78......Hank Williams-Kaw-Liga
494....................72......Bud Powell-Un Poco Loco
337....................38......Hank Williams-Ramblin' Man
345....................87......Charlie Parker-Bloomdido
330....................85......Edith Piaf-Padam… Padam
324....................83......Jimmy Forrest-Night Train
274....................91......Hank Williams-Take These Chains From My Heart
254....................96......Hank Williams-Hey Good Lookin'
220....................67......Moondog-Theme and Variations
203....................88......The Orioles-Crying in the Chapel
171....................57......Bulawayo Sweet Rhythms Band-Skokiaan
165....................53......Duke Ellington-The Tattooed Bride
154....................62......Frank Sinatra-In the Wee Small Hours of the Morning
151....................73......Chuck Berry-Sweet Little Sixteen
150....................40......Buddy Holly & The Crickets-Not Fade Away
146....................51......Yma Sumac-Xtabay (Lure of the Unknown Love)
142....................74......Gerry Mulligan-My Funny Valentine
141....................69......Jackie Brenston-Rocket 88
139....................61......Hank Williams-Your Cheatin' Heart
136....................80......Lloyd Price-Lawdy Miss Clawdy
130....................76......Hank Williams-Jambalaya (On the Bayou)
129....................60......Yma Sumac-Ataypura (High Andes)
125....................68......Vince Taylor-Brand New Cadillac
112....................46......Muddy Waters-Mannish Boy
109....................65......Ella Fitzgerald & Armstrong, Louis-Dream a Little Dream of Me
104....................56......Muddy Waters-Rollin' Stone
103....................29......Link Wray & His Wray Men-Rumble (yes a big drop for this one)
Last edited by DaveC on Mon Dec 05, 2016 4:33 am, edited 6 times in total.

DaveC
Die Mensch Maschine
Posts: 1147
Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2013 12:04 am

Re: AMF 1950s Song Poll Results

Postby DaveC » Tue Nov 29, 2016 6:41 pm

X
Last edited by DaveC on Thu Dec 01, 2016 12:01 am, edited 1 time in total.

DaveC
Die Mensch Maschine
Posts: 1147
Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2013 12:04 am

Re: AMF 1950s Song Poll Results

Postby DaveC » Wed Nov 30, 2016 4:50 am

X
Last edited by DaveC on Thu Dec 01, 2016 12:02 am, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
Dexter
Different Class
Posts: 349
Joined: Mon Apr 27, 2015 5:04 am

Re: AMF 1950s Song Poll Results

Postby Dexter » Wed Nov 30, 2016 6:22 am

So... I thought it wise(?) to give a background why "Adios Nonino" is my #1 song, so bear with me. I voted Astor Piazzolla as one of my favorites in the Artists' poll even though I was introduced to him fairly recently and through the most cliche of ways, rabid fandom. See, I have this celebrity crush on Yuna Kim, the S. Korean figure skater. She's cute, she donated to relief efforts in the Philippines, Japan and Nepal disasters, she has otherworldly talent, and she has impeccable taste in skating music - so what's not to love. Most of the classical music that she used are my favorites (my 1900-1949 songs list includes The Lark Ascending, Romance (The Gadfly), Nessun Dorma). I was familiar with most of it except for the ones by Astor Piazzolla - so thank you Yuna for introducing me to him. "Oblivion" and "Libertango" are two other Piazzolla compositions that Yuna used which I also highly recommend anyone to hear. "Adios Nonino" was performed at the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia. In my opinion, Yuna was cheated of the gold medal by the judges who favored the contestant from the host country. Her flawless performance (the other piece was "Send in the Clowns") is immortalized in youtube. Check it out here:



As to the song itself, it has a haunting yet majestic melody, the creation of such a divine tune is understandable since it was Piazzolla's way of saying farewell to his father who passed away before the song took real form.

jamieW
Die Mensch Maschine
Posts: 1072
Joined: Sat Oct 27, 2012 9:19 pm

Re: AMF 1950s Song Poll Results

Postby jamieW » Wed Nov 30, 2016 12:02 pm

Thanks for sharing, Dexter!

You named two of my favorite Piazzolla compositions with "Oblivion" (the piece that introduced me to him) and "Libertango." And I now have a newfound appreciation for "Adios Nonino" after seeing this performance and knowing the story behind the composition. As far as celebrity crushes go, you made a great choice!

User avatar
bonnielaurel
Unquestionable Presence
Posts: 594
Joined: Wed Feb 20, 2013 2:48 pm

Re: AMF 1950s Song Poll Results

Postby bonnielaurel » Wed Nov 30, 2016 3:54 pm

Dexter wrote:In my opinion, Yuna was cheated of the gold medal by the judges who favored the contestant from the host country. .

That's certainly true. I remember the experts agreed that she was robbed.

User avatar
Listyguy
Die Mensch Maschine
Posts: 1625
Joined: Sun Feb 05, 2012 8:34 pm

Re: AMF 1950s Song Poll Results

Postby Listyguy » Wed Nov 30, 2016 4:14 pm

Great results so far! I have to say, "Rumble" got a raw deal...dropping 71 places!!! It's one of the best used songs in Pulp Fiction, in my opinion.

DaveC
Die Mensch Maschine
Posts: 1147
Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2013 12:04 am

Re: AMF 1950s Song Poll Results

Postby DaveC » Wed Nov 30, 2016 6:27 pm

X
Last edited by DaveC on Thu Dec 01, 2016 12:02 am, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
andyd1010
Different Class
Posts: 283
Joined: Sun Jun 05, 2016 12:08 am

Re: AMF 1950s Song Poll Results

Postby andyd1010 » Wed Nov 30, 2016 7:18 pm

Was my list not counted? I had The Great Pretender at No. 2 and Smoke Gets in Your Eyes at No. 18.

DaveC
Die Mensch Maschine
Posts: 1147
Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2013 12:04 am

Re: AMF 1950s Song Poll Results

Postby DaveC » Wed Nov 30, 2016 8:02 pm

andyd1010 wrote:Was my list not counted? I had The Great Pretender at No. 2 and Smoke Gets in Your Eyes at No. 18.


I think you are correct - I will check with JamieW.

jamieW
Die Mensch Maschine
Posts: 1072
Joined: Sat Oct 27, 2012 9:19 pm

Re: AMF 1950s Song Poll Results

Postby jamieW » Wed Nov 30, 2016 9:57 pm

DaveC wrote:
andyd1010 wrote:Was my list not counted? I had The Great Pretender at No. 2 and Smoke Gets in Your Eyes at No. 18.


I think you are correct - I will check with JamieW.


My sincere apologies, andyd1010. I've already e-mailed DaveC, but I must've somehow managed to delete your column while I was calculating, since I did have your list originally. (I specifically remember, since I was thrilled by how high you had "Lonely Teardrops.") We are working on correcting this.

My apologies again to you, as well, Dave. Just let me know if you need me to re-enter Andy's information. (And my apologies to everyone, since I don't think we've ever had a case in AM poll history of an entire list being missed. Maybe this was the source of the ominous feeling I mentioned yesterday.) :(

User avatar
andyd1010
Different Class
Posts: 283
Joined: Sun Jun 05, 2016 12:08 am

Re: AMF 1950s Song Poll Results

Postby andyd1010 » Wed Nov 30, 2016 10:28 pm

jamieW wrote:
DaveC wrote:
andyd1010 wrote:Was my list not counted? I had The Great Pretender at No. 2 and Smoke Gets in Your Eyes at No. 18.


I think you are correct - I will check with JamieW.


My sincere apologies, andyd1010. I've already e-mailed DaveC, but I must've somehow managed to delete your column while I was calculating, since I did have your list originally. (I specifically remember, since I was thrilled by how high you had "Lonely Teardrops.") We are working on correcting this.

My apologies again to you, as well, Dave. Just let me know if you need me to re-enter Andy's information. (And my apologies to everyone, since I don't think we've ever had a case in AM poll history of an entire list being missed. Maybe this was the source of the ominous feeling I mentioned yesterday.) :(


No worries! I appreciate that you're going back to include it. And yes, Lonely Teardrops is a great one.

User avatar
Listyguy
Die Mensch Maschine
Posts: 1625
Joined: Sun Feb 05, 2012 8:34 pm

Re: AMF 1950s Song Poll Results

Postby Listyguy » Wed Nov 30, 2016 11:38 pm

jamieW wrote: (And my apologies to everyone, since I don't think we've ever had a case in AM poll history of an entire list being missed. Maybe this was the source of the ominous feeling I mentioned yesterday.) :(

No worries! And trust me this isn't the first time (and won't be the last) this or something like it has happened in a poll.

jamieW
Die Mensch Maschine
Posts: 1072
Joined: Sat Oct 27, 2012 9:19 pm

Re: AMF 1950s Song Poll Results

Postby jamieW » Thu Dec 01, 2016 12:02 am

Thanks for the kind words, guys. I'm still feeling pretty lousy right now because I spent sooooo many hours trying to ensure something like this wouldn't happen ... and then I miss someone's list entirely. (And this wasn't even the poll I was worried about - I was far more concerned about the 1900-49 songs.) I just don't want to make extra work for DaveC, who was kind enough to volunteer for the presentation.

DaveC
Die Mensch Maschine
Posts: 1147
Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2013 12:04 am

Re: AMF 1950s Song Poll Results

Postby DaveC » Thu Dec 01, 2016 12:03 am

It wouldn't be an AMF decade poll without a re-count. Starting again soon.

DaveC
Die Mensch Maschine
Posts: 1147
Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2013 12:04 am

Re: AMF 1950s Song Poll Results

Postby DaveC » Thu Dec 01, 2016 12:40 am

100. Miles Davis - All Blues

Year of release: 1959
Points: 94.112
Voters: 4
AM 50s Songs Rank: Unranked
2010 poll top 100 position: 20 (Change -80)
Biggest fans: Live in Phoenix(16)

Thomas Ward for AllMusic: “All Blues” is somewhat of an oddity on Kind of Blue – it’s played in 6/8 time played in the standard blues form of 12 measures. “All Blues” nevertheless is based on modal improvisation, and Davis’ own free melodic conception. “All Blues” was a live staple throughout much of Davis’ career, and it’s easy to see why – the tune is built upon the melodic brilliance of Davis’ trumpet, which even Coltrane fails to upstage during his solo. “All Blues” is also a testament to Jimmy Cobb’s light, fluid drumming, a rather unsung hero of the Kind of Blue sessions, but a most vital member of the group



99. Iannis Xenakis - Metastasis

Year of release: 1954
Points: 96.43
Voters: 4
AM 50s Songs Rank: Unranked
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: sonofsamiam(5)

Wikipedia: Metastaseis was inspired by the combination of an Einsteinian view of time and Xenakis' memory of the sounds of warfare…….As Newtonian views of time show it flowing linearly, Einsteinian views show it as a function of matter and energy; change one of those quantities and time too is changed. Xenakis attempted to make this distinction in his music. While most traditional compositions depend on strictly measured time for the progress of the line, using an unvarying tempo, time signature, or phrase length, Metastaseis changes intensity, register, and density of scoring, as the musical analogues of mass and energy. It is by these changes that the piece propels itself forward: the first and third movements of the work do not have even a melodic theme or motive to hold them together, but rather depend on the strength of this conceptualization of time.



98. The Drifters - There Goes My Baby

Year of release: 1959
Points: 96.73
Voters: 5
AM 50s Songs Rank: 49 (584 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: andyd1010(24)

Rolling Stone: Leiber and Stoller wanted a striking sound to match new vocalist Ben E. King's majestic voice. The odd arrangement featured out-of-tune timpani and strings that seemed to quote Tchaikovsky's "1812 Overture." "It sounded like a radio caught between two stations," wrote Atlantic's Jerry Wexler. But King's croon soared above it all.



97. Stan Kenton - City of Glass: Entrance Into The City

Year of release: 1952
Points: 99.064
Voters: 3
AM 50s Songs Rank: Unranked
2010 poll top 100 position: 66 (Change -31)
Biggest fans: sonofsamiam(6)

Wikipedia: Olivier Messiaen's "Mode de Valeurs et Dintensites" (1949) comes to mind with the first opening music of Graettinger's Entrance Into The City (in two parts). The 'jagged edges' (akin to Anton Webern) and use of free dissonance by each composer while (simultaneously) writing across the Atlantic from one another are notable. In essence, the same effect was being achieved with little to no knowledge of one another's work.

Scott Yanow for AllMusic: To call this music shocking would be an understatement. Bob Graettinger was one of the most radical arrangers around in the 1950s and it is doubtful whether any other jazz big-band leader other than Stan Kenton would have ever employed him. These performances are intense, very dense and quite scary. Recommended for open-eared listeners.



96. Karlheinz Stockhausen - Gesang der Jünglinge

Year of release: 1956
Points: 99.364
Voters: 2
AM 50s Songs Rank: Unranked
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: sonofsamiam(3)

Edward Moore for AllMusic: The guiding ideal of this piece is Stockhausen's conviction that composing should not involve simply the arrangement of musical sound, but both the "composition of sounds themselves" and the "synthesizing of the individual sound." The result is more than just a musical moment or monument; it is the representation of the very emergence of music from the disorder of raw sound.



95. Dinah Washington - Mad About the Boy

Year of release: 1952
Points: 99.832
Voters: 3
AM 50s Songs Rank: 138 (2296 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: bonnielaurel(11)

Wikipedia: Mad About the Boy is a popular song with words and music by actor and playwright Sir Noël Coward. It was introduced in the 1932 revue Words and Music by Joyce Barbour, Steffi Duna, Norah Howard and Doris Hare. The song deals with the theme of unrequited love for a film star. It was written to be sung by female characters, although Coward also wrote a version, which was never performed, that contained references to the then risqué topic of homosexual love



91=. Astor Piazzolla - Adiós Nonino

Year of release: 1959
Points: 100
Voters: 1
AM 50s Songs Rank: Unranked
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: Dexter(1)

Astor Piazzolla: The number one piece is Adiós Nonino. I challenged myself to write a better one and I couldn’t. It has a very intimate feel, almost funereal and yet it blew everything up. The day we premiered it with the Quintet, the musicians said ‘This one isn’t worth shit. No one is going to like it.’ And yet there it is…Adios Nonino ended wrong but like life: it just fades away. People liked it from the start, perhaps because it has a mysterious air, a melody that plays off a very strong rhythmic foundation. Then it changes key and finally that glorious ending with a sad resolution. Perhaps that’s why people liked it: it was different from everything else.



91=. Ella Fitzgerald - I Love Paris

Year of release: 1956
Points: 100
Voters: 1
AM 50s Songs Rank: Unranked
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: Brad(1)

Wikipedia: "I Love Paris" is a popular song written by Cole Porter and published in 1953. The song was introduced by Lilo in the musical Can-Can. A line in the song's lyrics inspired the title of the 1964 movie "Paris When It Sizzles."



91=. Frank Sinatra - Where Are You?
Image
Year of release: 1957
Points: 100
Voters: 1
AM 50s Songs Rank: Unranked
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: Live in Phoenix(1)

DaveC: “Where Are You?” is the title track of the first album that Frank Sinatra recorded with arranger Gordon Jenkins.



91=. Thelonious Monk - Brilliant Corners

Year of release: 1957
Points: 100
Voters: 1
AM 50s Songs Rank: Unranked
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: sonofsamiam(1)

DaveC: The title track of the album we ranked at #11 in our 1950s album poll.

DaveC
Die Mensch Maschine
Posts: 1147
Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2013 12:04 am

Re: AMF 1950s Song Poll Results

Postby DaveC » Thu Dec 01, 2016 1:58 am

90. Buddy Holly & The Crickets - Oh, Boy!

Year of release: 1957
Points: 101.19
Voters: 2
AM 50s Songs Rank: 204 (3400 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: Live in Phoenix(5)

Songfacts: Holly and The Crickets performed this on their second and final Ed Sullivan Show appearance on January 26, 1958. Sullivan was not happy with the song selection, as he considered it too raunchy, but Holly insisted on performing it. Possibly in retaliation, Sullivan introduced him as "Buddy Hollet," and Holly can be seen trying to turn up his guitar, which had been set too low. While most musical guests were given 2 songs, Holly got just the one.



89. Moondog - Surf Session

Year of release: 1956
Points: 104.12
Voters: 2
AM 50s Songs Rank: Unranked
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: Charlie Driggs(4)

Phillip Glass: He ended up living with us for nearly a year. I thought he was terrific, fascinating and musically very interesting. We formed a music group, Moondog, Steve Reich, Jon Gibson and myself. For a time, we had weekly sessions playing Moondog's compositions. We took his work very seriously and understood and appreciated it much more than what we were exposed to at Juilliard. Steve recorded many of our sessions. Moondog personified the maverick, solitary hero composer, like Nancarrow, Partch, Ives and Ruggles.



88. Elvis Presley - Love Me Tender

Year of release: 1956
Points: 105.52
Voters: 2
AM 50s Songs Rank: 89 (1115 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: Henry(2)

Wikipedia: Ken Darby described Elvis Presley's role in the creation of the song: "He adjusted the music and the lyrics to his own particular presentation. Elvis has the most terrific ear of anyone I have ever met. He does not read music, but he does not need to. All I had to do was play the song for him once, and he made it his own! He has perfect judgment of what is right for him. He exercised that judgment when he chose 'Love Me Tender' as his theme song."



87. Harry Belafonte - The Banana Boat Song (Day-O)

Year of release: 1956
Points: 106.33
Voters: 4
AM 50s Songs Rank: 192 (3067 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 93 (Change +6)
Biggest fans: Miguel(9)

Songfacts: This is a traditional Jamaican song that was sung by dock workers who worked throughout the night loading bananas onto ships. It's daylight, and they look forward to the arrival of the Tallyman (who will take inventory) so they can go home.



86. Bobby Darin - Mack the Knife

Year of release: 1959
Points: 107.14
Voters: 5
AM 50s Songs Rank: 56 (691 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: Listyguy(18)

DaveC: We have another version coming up later, but this was the biggest selling version.

Songfacts: The original German lyrics were far more graphic, making it clear that this is a murderer we're talking about. For American audiences, the translation was more ambiguous to soften the killings, essential in eluding censors in the conservative 1950s.



85. Dion - A Teenager in Love

Year of release: 1959
Points: 109.81
Voters: 2
AM 50s Songs Rank: 67 (822 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: Henry(5), andyd1010(19)

Songfacts: Dion was a teenager when this was released, but he turned 20 about a month later. He was one of several teen idols of this era; others included Ricky Nelson, Fabian, Frankie Avalon and Ritchie Valens.



84. Henri Salvador - Dans mon île

Year of release: 1959
Points: 111.12
Voters: 5
AM 50s Songs Rank: Unranked
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: nicolas(6)

Wikipedia: Henri Salvador and his song "Dans mon île" were thought to be an influence on Antônio Carlos Jobim in formulating the Brazilian bossa nova style.



83. Édith Piaf - Milord

Year of release: 1959
Points: 113.24
Voters: 5
AM 50s Songs Rank: 329 (5827 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 63 (Change -20)
Biggest fans: Miguel(12)

Wikipedia: is a chanson that recounts the feelings of a lower-class "girl of the port" (perhaps a prostitute) who develops a crush on an elegantly attired apparent upper-class British traveller (or "milord"), whom she has seen walking the streets of the town several times (with a beautiful young woman on his arm), but who has not even noticed her. The singer feels that she is nothing more than a "shadow of the street" (ombre de la rue). Nonetheless, when she talks to him of love, she breaks through his shell; he begins to cry, and she has the job of cheering him up again. She succeeds, and the song ends with her shouting "Bravo! Milord" and "Encore, Milord".



82. Le Grand Kallé & l'African Jazz - Ambiance Kallé Catho

Year of release: 1957
Points: 114.65
Voters: 3
AM 50s Songs Rank: Unranked
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: Dan(9)

Wikipedia: Le Grand Kallé et l'African Jazz, was a popular and extremely influential Congolese rumba (soukous) band from the modern-day Democratic Republic of the Congo. Founded in 1953 in Léopoldville (modern-day Kinshasa) under Belgian colonial rule, the band was led by Joseph Kabasele Tshamala, popularly known by his stage name Le Grand Kallé.



81. The Five Satins - In the Still of the Nite

Year of release: 1956
Points: 118.14
Voters: 8
AM 50s Songs Rank: 45 (495 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: Dexter(31)

Wikipedia: In the Still of the Night is one of two songs that may lay claim to being the origin of the term doo-wop. The plaintive doo wop, doo wah refrain in the bridge has often been suggested as the origin of the term to describe that musical genre. (The other contender for the honor is "When You Dance" by the Turbans, in which the chant "doo-wop" can be heard.) In the Still of the Night is the only song to have charted on the Billboard Hot 100 three separate times, by the same artist with the same version each time. After initially reaching #24 in 1956, it was released again in 1960 and reached #81. Then more than a year later in 1961 it reached #99.

DaveC
Die Mensch Maschine
Posts: 1147
Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2013 12:04 am

Re: AMF 1950s Song Poll Results

Postby DaveC » Thu Dec 01, 2016 6:15 pm

80. Little Richard - Lucille

Year of release: 1957
Points: 118.65
Voters: 6
AM 50s Songs Rank: 93 (1236 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: Brad(13)

Songfacts: This song began as a ballad Richard wrote called "Directly From My Heart to You," which he recorded as a member of The Johnny Otis band in 1955. "Directly From My Heart to You" was released by Peacock Records as a B-side, and when Little Richard recorded for Specialty Records in September 1955, he tried recording the song for his first album. It didn't make the cut, but Richard's career took off, and when he needed another single in 1957, he revived the song, but gave it the sound that made him a star, speeding up the tempo considerably.



79. Gene Kelly - Singin' in the Rain

Year of release: 1952
Points: 120.74
Voters: 7
AM 50s Songs Rank: 120 (1980 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 42 (Change -37)
Biggest fans: Miguel(14)

Wikipedia: "Singin' in the Rain" was first performed by Doris Eaton Travis in the 1929 revue The Hollywood Music Box Revue. The song became a hit and was recorded by a number of artists, notably Cliff Edwards, who also performed the number with the Brox Sisters in the early MGM musical The Hollywood Revue of 1929. B.A. Rolfe and his Lucky Strike Orchestra recorded the song possibly as early as 1928 but perhaps 1929. The song was performed by Annette Hanshaw in her album Volume 6, on film by Jimmy Durante in Speak Easily (1932), by Judy Garland in Little Nellie Kelly (1940), and as background music at the beginning of MGM's The Divorcee (1930) starring Norma Shearer. The song is known today as the centerpiece of the musical film Singin' in the Rain (1952), in which Gene Kelly memorably danced to the song while splashing through puddles during a rainstorm. The song is also performed during the opening credits of the film.



78. Charles Mingus - Pithecanthropus Erectus

Year of release: 1956
Points: 123.42
Voters: 3
AM 50s Songs Rank: 291 (5158 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: Charlie Driggs(1)

Review by hprill on RYM: [Pithecanthropus Erectus] is supposed to chart the evolution of mankind through the four stages of: evolution - superiority complex - decline - destruction, and it's built on a walking bass line and sax riff that repeatedly passes through numerous stages of chaos with freak blowouts from McLean and Monterose; yet the occasional cacophony does not distract and the hypnotic quality of the bass line leaves the listener little choice other than to listen with full attention through all 10 minutes of Mingus's rich musical diorama.



77. Édith Piaf - La Foule

Year of release: 1957
Points: 125.02
Voters: 4
AM 50s Songs Rank: 244 (4123 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: bonnielaurel(12), DaveC(17)

Wikipedia: Edith Piaf heard the song "Que nadie sepa mi sufrir" from the 1953 recording by Alberto Castillo. It was composed in 1936 by Ángel Cabral, with (Spanish) lyrics by Enrique Dizeo, both of Argentine origin. It was a Peruvian Vals, which, in the period between the 1930s and 1950s, was a very popular musical genre in Spanish-speaking America. Piaf recorded a French language version, with lyrics by Michel Rivgauche. The lyrics relate the chance meeting between the singer and a man in the middle of a dense and festive crowd. It's love at first sight, at least from the singer's part, who thanks the crowd for giving her this man. But, just as quickly as it brought them together, the crowd separates them and she never sees him again. "The crowd appears as a sort of demiurge (creator), like destiny, playing with the human beings who are helpless against the vagaries of chance."



76. Georges Brassens - Le gorille

Year of release: 1952
Points: 125.24
Voters: 4
AM 50s Songs Rank: Unranked
2010 poll top 100 position: 49 (Change -27)
Biggest fans: nicolas(1)

nicolas: "The best anti-death penalty song ever. When you use humor and derision, nothing can stop you."



75. Bobby Darin - Beyond the Sea

Year of release: 1959
Points: 128.54
Voters: 4
AM 50s Songs Rank: 178 (2800 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: Dan(11), Listyguy(11)

Wikipedia: Trenet had composed "La Mer" (which means "the Sea") with French lyrics completely different and unrelated to the English-language version that Jack Lawrence later wrote. Trenet's French version was a homage and ode to the changing moods of the sea, while Lawrence, by just adding one word "Beyond" to the title, gave him the start whereby he made the song into one of a dear lover mourning for a lost love.



74. Pérez Prado and His Orchestra - Mambo No. 5

Year of release: 1950
Points: 131.4
Voters: 4
AM 50s Songs Rank: 147 (2417 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 84 (Change +10)
Biggest fans: Listyguy(13), Dexter(17)

Wikipedia: Dámaso Pérez Prado was a Cuban bandleader, singer, organist, pianist and composer, who also made brief appearances in films. He is often referred to as the King of the Mambo.



73. Georges Brassens - La marine

Year of release: 1953
Points: 132.45
Voters: 3
AM 50s Songs Rank: Unranked
2010 poll top 100 position: 70 (Change -3)
Biggest fans: nicolas(2)

nicolas: "A great song about love, death and time that eats everything."



72. Nat King Cole - Unforgettable

Year of release: 1951
Points: 133.1
Voters: 4
AM 50s Songs Rank: Bubbling
2010 poll top 100 position: 97 (Change +25)
Biggest fans: bonnielaurel(8)

Songfacts: Nat King Cole was biggest seller for Capitol Records for much of the late '40s and early '50s. He did a lot of work with Nelson Riddle at Capitol, but "Unforgettable" was the first session where Riddle got an official credit for his arrangement.



71. Jackie Wilson - Reet Petite (The Finest Girl You Ever Want To Meet)

Year of release: 1957
Points: 135.16
Voters: 6
AM 50s Songs Rank: 75 (911 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 86 (Change +15)
Biggest fans: Miguel(4)

Wikipedia: The song was written by Berry Gordy, Gwen Gordy Fuqua and Wilson's cousin Roquel "Billy" Davis. It was Jackie Wilson's first recording as a solo artist. The song peaked at #62 on the Billboard Hot 100 in September 1957 and reached #6 on the UK Singles Chart. With the success of the song (and the later single "Lonely Teardrops [yet to come in our countdown]), Gordy was able to fund the launch of Motown Records.

DaveC
Die Mensch Maschine
Posts: 1147
Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2013 12:04 am

Re: AMF 1950s Song Poll Results

Postby DaveC » Fri Dec 02, 2016 1:43 am

70. The Chords - Sh-Boom (Life Could Be a Dream)

Year of release: 1954
Points: 136.37
Voters: 6
AM 50s Songs Rank: 76 (921 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: Listyguy(14)

Wikipedia: The song was first recorded on Atlantic Records' subsidiary label Cat Records by the Chords on March 15, 1954 and would be their only hit song. "Sh-Boom" peaked at #9 on the pop charts. It is sometimes considered to be the first doo-wop or rock 'n' roll record to reach the top ten on the pop charts.



69. James Brown and the Famous Flames - Please Please Please

Year of release: 1956
Points: 138.45
Voters: 5
AM 50s Songs Rank: 43 (457 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: Brad(3)

Wikipedia: According to Etta James, Brown and his group came up with the idea for their first song, because Brown "used to carry around an old tattered napkin with him, because Little Richard had written the words, 'please, please, please' on it and James was determined to make a song out of it".



68. Gene Vincent & His Blue Caps - Be-Bop-A-Lula

Year of release: 1956
Points: 139.05
Voters: 8
AM 50s Songs Rank: 13 (118 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 50 (Change -18)
Biggest fans: Dexter(32)

Songfacts: Recorded in Nashville on May 4, 1956, this was released as the B-side of Vincent's first single, a provocative number called "Woman Love." Radio stations in the United States wanted nothing to do with "Woman Love," and the BBC banned it, so Capitol flipped the sides and put out "Be-Bop-a-Lula" as the A-side; for some reason the scandalous "Woman Love" was deemed inoffensive when relegated to a B-side. Vincent was signed by Capitol Records, who were desperately searching for someone like Elvis Presley. Vincent had the rebel image and swagger they were looking for, and their investment paid off when "Be-Bop-a-Lula," sold 200,000 copies in the first month it was released. The song helped Vincent gain a large cult following, but his rebel image was justified, and he became dependent on painkillers, speed and alcohol. Vincent, who had just three more Top 40 hits, was injured in the car crash that killed his good friend and fellow rocker Eddie Cochran in 1960 . He died of an ulcer in 1971 at age 36.



67. Mahalia Jackson - In the Upper Room

Year of release: 1952
Points: 139.62
Voters: 4
AM 50s Songs Rank: Unranked
2010 poll top 100 position: 47 (Change -20)
Biggest fans: sonofsamiam(7), nicolas(10)

nicolas: "This was the music I had played in the Church when I got married."



66. The Platters - Smoke Gets In Your Eyes

Year of release: 1958
Points: 141.23
Voters: 7
AM 50s Songs Rank: 146 (2363 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 59 (Change -7)
Biggest fans: andyd1010(18)

Wikipedia: Smoke Gets in Your Eyes is a show tune written by American composer Jerome Kern and lyricist Otto Harbach for their 1933 musical Roberta. The song was sung in the original Broadway show by Tamara Drasin. Its first recorded performance was by Gertrude Niesen, who recorded the song with orchestral direction from Ray Sinatra, Frank Sinatra's second cousin, on October 13, 1933. Paul Whiteman had the first hit recording of the song on the record charts in 1934. The song was later a chart hit in 1958 for The Platters.



65. The Platters - Only You (And You Alone)

Year of release: 1955
Points: 143.93
Voters: 8
AM 50s Songs Rank: 69 (862 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: bonnielaurel(15)

Wikipedia: Platters bass singer Herb Reed later recalled how the group hit upon its successful version: "We tried it so many times, and it was terrible. One time we were rehearsing in the car ... and the car jerked. Tony went 'O-oHHHH-nly you.' We laughed at first, but when he sang that song—that was the sign we had hit on something."



64. Buddy Holly & The Crickets - Everyday

Year of release: 1957
Points: 143.96
Voters: 8
AM 50s Songs Rank: 129 (2114 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: Henry(15)

Wikipedia: "Everyday" is a song written by Buddy Holly and Norman Petty, recorded by Buddy Holly and the Crickets on May 29., 1957, and released on September 20, 1957, as the B-side of "Peggy Sue". On the original single the Crickets are not mentioned, but it is known that Holly plays acoustic guitar; drummer Jerry Allison taps on a typewriter for percussion; Joe B. Mauldin plays a standup acoustic bass; and the producer Norman Petty's wife, Vi, plays the celesta.



63. The Penguins - Earth Angel (Will You Be Mine)

Year of release: 1954
Points: 144.58
Voters: 6
AM 50s Songs Rank: 72 (886 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 92 (Change +29)
Biggest fans: Live in Phoenix(12)

Songfacts: The song was recorded in June 1954, and released in September. It was issued as the B-side of another song called "Hey Senorita," but DJs flipped the record and "Earth Angel" was deemed the A-side. It was a huge hit, and landed The Penguins a major label record deal with Mercury Records. The Penguins never had another hit but the Penguins were managed by Buck Ram, who as part of the deal insisted that Mercury also sign another of his acts: The Platters. The Penguins broke up in 1962, but The Platters had 23 US Top-40 hits.



62. Jerry Lee Lewis - Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin' On

Year of release: 1957
Points: 148.08
Voters: 6
AM 50s Songs Rank: 8 (81 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 44 (Change -18)
Biggest fans: Bruno(11), Dexter(8)

Songfacts: This was Jerry Lee Lewis's second single, following up his cover of the Ray Price Country song "Crazy Arms," which went nowhere. Lewis was signed to the famous Sun Records, who also had Elvis Presley. This song was the first of Lewis' four Top 40 hits, which all occurred in a period of about a year and a half. In 1958, his hits dried up when word of his marriage to 13-year-old Myra Gale Brown got out. Despite just the four hits and an unsavory reputation, Lewis was so revered as a rock pioneer that he was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in the first class. Radio stations found all kinds of reasons not to play this song: It was too suggestive, he cursed on it, ("We-e-ll-a" sounded like "We-hella"), he sounded black (most stations didn't play songs by black artists). Still, the song sold well in the southern United States, but it wasn't until Lewis' TV debut on The Steve Allen Show on July 28, 1957 that it became a national hit and sold over 6 million copies. The song also generated a lot of controversy, as the lyrics were rather lascivious and quite shocking coming from a singer from the Bible Belt.



61. The Chordettes - Mr. Sandman

Year of release: 1954
Points: 149.36
Voters: 7
AM 50s Songs Rank: 144 (2327 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 81 (Change +20)
Biggest fans: Miguel(18), Live in Phoenix(20)

Songfacts: "Mr. Sandman" was written by song-writer Pat Ballard and first recorded by The Chordettes. It became the first hit for them, staying at #1 for an amazing seven weeks in 1954 and launching their career. The Chordettes eventually went on to peek into the Top-40 nine times in total. The Chordettes were Jinny Osborn, Nancy Overton, Lynn Evans and Carol Buschmann. This song is an excellent example of their main form, singing close harmony a cappella with minimal accompaniment. The Chordettes kept up the wholesome sweet-as-angels image throughout the '50s and into the '60s.

DaveC
Die Mensch Maschine
Posts: 1147
Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2013 12:04 am

Re: AMF 1950s Song Poll Results

Postby DaveC » Fri Dec 02, 2016 6:19 pm

60. Ella Fitzgerald - Ev'ry Time We Say Goodbye

Year of release: 1956
Points: 153.44
Voters: 4
AM 50s Songs Rank: 171 (2709 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: bonnielaurel(2), sonofsamiam(13)

Wikipedia: This Cole Porter song was introduced in the 1944 musical revue Seven Lively Arts. Ella Fitzgerald's version is generally considered to be the definitive interpretation. Cole Porter incorporated a musical joke in the song's score by including a chord change that goes from minor to major in opposition to the lyric "how strange the change from major to minor."



59. Ray Charles - I've Got a Woman

Year of release: 1954
Points: 155.38
Voters: 7
AM 50s Songs Rank: 36 (337 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 55 (Change -4)
Biggest fans: Listyguy(16), andyd1010(20)

Wikipedia: The song builds on "It Must Be Jesus" by the Southern Tones, which Ray Charles was listening to on the radio while on the road with his band in the summer of 1954. He and a member of his band, trumpeter Renald Richard, penned a song that was built along a gospel-frenetic pace with secular lyrics and a jazz-inspired rhythm and blues (R&B) background. The song would be one of the prototypes for what later became termed as "soul music" after Charles released "What'd I Say" nearly five years later.



58. Boris Vian - Le déserteur

Year of release: 1955
Points: 161.13
Voters: 6
AM 50s Songs Rank: 275 (4787 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 79 (Change +21)
Biggest fans: DaveC(11), nicolas(4)

nicolas: "Best anti-war song ? At least a strong contender. My 6-yr old daughter loves it and in the beginning it even made her cry ! Papa, war is so sad !!! Sometimes a child just reminds you of essential things. And the cynical can laugh (f… them).."



57. Hank Williams and His Drifting Cowboys - Long Gone Lonesome Blues

Year of release: 1950
Points: 162.69
Voters: 6
AM 50s Songs Rank: Unranked
2010 poll top 100 position: 12 (Change -45)
Biggest fans: Honorio(5)

Honorio: So lonesome he could cry. Almost every root style made art from sorrow and pain, the best examples could be Blues and Flamenco but also Tango or Bolero. And Country, of course, with Hank Williams showcasing his command on yodeling and painting the perfect portrait of loneliness and despair, just like his own death on the back seat of a Cadillac. Alone. And blue.



56. Charles Mingus - Better Git It in Your Soul

Year of release: 1959
Points: 163.51
Voters: 4
AM 50s Songs Rank: Unranked
2010 poll top 100 position: 34 (Change -22)
Biggest fans: sonofsamiam(16), Dan(3)

nicolas: The power of soul and gospel is alive in this great jazz piece.



55. Les Paul & Mary Ford - How High the Moon

Year of release: 1951
Points: 163.51
Voters: 5
AM 50s Songs Rank: 85 (1053 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 39 (Change -16)
Biggest fans: Miguel(1)

Wikipedia: Paul McCartney stated during the filming of Les Paul: Chasing Sound that "How High the Moon" was the first song The Beatles played when they first got together.



54. Elvis Presley - All Shook Up

Year of release: 1957
Points: 169.67
Voters: 7
AM 50s Songs Rank: 60 (756 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 41 (Change -13)
Biggest fans: Miguel(7)

Wikipedia: On January 12, 1957, Presley recorded the song at Radio Recorders in Hollywood. The duet vocal on the record is by the Jordanaires first tenor Gordon Stoker.In March the song entered Billboard's Top 100 chart at #25. Within three weeks it had knocked Perry Como's "Round and Round" off the top spot, and stayed there for eight consecutive weeks. The song also became Presley's first No. hit on the UK Singles Chart, remaining there for seven weeks. Sales of the single exceeded two million, and the song was named Billboard's Year End number one song for 1957.



53. The Flamingos - I Only Have Eyes for You

Year of release: 1959
Points: 170.98
Voters: 10
AM 50s Songs Rank: 41 (448 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 4 (Change -49)
Biggest fans: Henry(20)

Songfacts: This song was written by Henry Warren and Al Dubin for the Busby Berkeley movie musical Dames in 1934, where it was introduced by Dick Powell and Ruby Keeler. Ben Selvin recorded it that same year and landed at #2 on the charts. The Flamingos recorded it in 1959, and it also appeared on the American Graffiti soundtrack from 1973.



52. Chet Baker - My Funny Valentine

Year of release: 1954
Points: 171.17
Voters: 9
AM 50s Songs Rank: 64 (801 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 37 (Change -15)
Biggest fans: DaveC(10)

Wikipedia: "My Funny Valentine" is a show tune from the 1937 Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart musical Babes in Arms. The song became a popular jazz standard, appearing on over 1300 albums performed by over 600 artists.



51. Ritchie Valens - La Bamba

Year of release: 1958
Points: 171.85
Voters: 8
AM 50s Songs Rank: 30 (307 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: Dan(21)

Songfacts: "La Bamba" is a traditional Mexican folk song that became a hit for the young rocker Ritchie Valens after he died in a plane crash on February 3, 1959 along with Buddy Holly and The Big Bopper. The song is very popular with Mariachi bands and is often played at weddings. The lyrics are in Spanish: "Para bailar la Bamba se necessita una poca de gracia" means "To dance La Bamba you need to have a little grace."

DaveC
Die Mensch Maschine
Posts: 1147
Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2013 12:04 am

Re: AMF 1950s Song Poll Results

Postby DaveC » Fri Dec 02, 2016 7:53 pm

Only 5 of the songs that made our top 10 in 2010 are in this poll's top 10.

Dropping from #4 to #53, The Flamingos - "I Only Have Eyes for You" was the most severe casualty. (other former top 10 songs are at #29, #18, #17 & #15).

DaveC
Die Mensch Maschine
Posts: 1147
Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2013 12:04 am

Re: AMF 1950s Song Poll Results

Postby DaveC » Sat Dec 03, 2016 5:29 am

50. The Champs - Tequila

Year of release: 1958
Points: 172.9
Voters: 6
AM 50s Songs Rank: 109 (1676 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: Live in Phoenix(3), Henry(16)

Wikipedia: In 1957, Gene Autry's record label, Challenge Records, signed Dave Burgess, a rockabilly singer-songwriter from California who often recorded under the name "Dave Dupree". At the end of 1957, having produced no hits, Challenge Records looked to Burgess, who organized a recording session on December 23 in Hollywood. In the studio that day were Burgess on rhythm guitar, Cliff Hills on bass guitar, the Flores Trio (Danny Flores on saxophone and keyboards, Gene Alden on drums, and lead guitarist Buddy Bruce), and Huelyn Duvall contributing backing vocals. They gathered primarily to record "Train to Nowhere", a song by Burgess, as well as "Night Beat" and "All Night Rock". The last tune recorded was "Tequila", essentially just a jam by the Flores Trio. There were three takes, and Danny Flores, who wrote the song, was also the man who actually spoke the word "Tequila!". Flores also played the trademark "dirty sax" solo. The song served as the B-side for "Train to Nowhere", which was released by Challenge Records on January 15, 1958. Duvall recalls that the record initially found little success, but, after a DJ in Cleveland played the B-side, "Tequila" skyrocketed up the charts, reaching #1 on the Billboard chart on March 28, 1958.



49. Buddy Holly & The Crickets - Peggy Sue

Year of release: 1957
Points: 173.37
Voters: 8
AM 50s Songs Rank: 18 (156 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 19 (Change -30)
Biggest fans: Henry(23)

Wikipedia: The song was originally entitled "Cindy Lou", after Holly's niece, the daughter of his sister Pat Holley Kaiter. The title was later changed to "Peggy Sue" in reference to Peggy Sue Gerron, the girlfriend (and future wife) of Jerry Allison, the drummer for the Crickets, after the couple had temporarily broken up.



48. Big Joe Turner - Shake, Rattle and Roll

Year of release: 1954
Points: 177.05
Voters: 8
AM 50s Songs Rank: 24 (235 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 99 (Change +51)
Biggest fans: Bruno(9)

Rolling Stone: Atlantic Records' contribution to the birth of rock & roll (Wexler and Ertegun even sang backup), "Shake, Rattle & Roll" was written specifically for big-voiced blues singer Turner, one of the label's early stars. "Everybody was singing slow blues when I was young, and I thought I'd put a beat to it and sing it uptempo," Turner said. This track, with its big bounce and raunchy lyrics ("I'm like a one-eyed cat peepin' in a seafood store"), topped the R&B charts; typical of the times, a sanitized cover by Bill Haley and the Comets got white America bopping.



47. Sam Cooke - You Send Me

Year of release: 1957
Points: 177.15
Voters: 9
AM 50s Songs Rank: 25 (238 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 43 (Change -4)
Biggest fans: Henry(6)

Rolling Stone: The plan was to remake gospel star Cooke as a secular singer. But Specialty Records owner Art Rupe objected so strongly to Richard Blackwell's (the producer) use of white female backing vocalists for a session — Rupe thought that Cooke was watering his sound down too much — that he released Cooke from his contract. Major-label scouts were confused by the record, too, thinking it was too soft for R&B but too gritty for the pop charts. Then Blackwell took the tapes to Keen Records' Bob Keane, who had signed Ritchie Valens and who smelled another winner. "I said, 'Screw the black market,'" Keane said. "'This is a pop record, daddy-o!'"



46. Lotte Lenya - Die Moritat von Mackie Messer

Year of release: 1955
Points: 178.56
Voters: 5
AM 50s Songs Rank: Bubbling
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: Dan(12), DaveC(16), Honorio(17)

Wikipedia: "Mack the Knife" or "The Ballad of Mack the Knife", originally "Die Moritat von Mackie Messer", is a song composed by Kurt Weill with lyrics by Bertolt Brecht for their music drama Die Dreigroschenoper, or, as it is known in English, The Threepenny Opera. It premiered in Berlin in 1928 at the Theater am Schiffbauerdamm. The song has become a popular standard recorded by many artists, including a US and UK number one hit for Bobby Darin in 1959.

DaveC: Lotte Lenya was married to Kurt Weill.



45. Peggy Lee - Fever

Year of release: 1958
Points: 179.09
Voters: 9
AM 50s Songs Rank: 103 (1587 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 54 (Change +9)
Biggest fans: bonnielaurel(13), Charlie Driggs(11)

Wikipedia: "Fever" is a song written by Eddie Cooley and Otis Blackwell, who used the pseudonym John Davenport. It was originally recorded by American R&B singer Little Willie John in 1956 and released as a single in April of the same year. In May 1958, Peggy Lee recorded a cover version of the song, which featured significantly rewritten lyrics composed by Lee herself without credit. The uncopyrighted lyrics by Lee featured historical invokings (including the verses beginning "Romeo loved Juliet," and "Captain Smith and Pocahontas") are now generally thought of as a standard part of the song, and have been included in most subsequent covers of "Fever".



44. Fats Domino - Ain't That a Shame

Year of release: 1955
Points: 179.26
Voters: 8
AM 50s Songs Rank: 57 (692 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 75 (Change +31)
Biggest fans: Miguel(17), andyd1010(17)

Wikipedia: "Ain't That a Shame" was the first song that John Lennon learned to play. He later covered it on the album Rock 'n' Roll.



43. Bobby Bland - I'll Take Care of You

Year of release: 1959
Points: 180.57
Voters: 3
AM 50s Songs Rank: Bubbling
2010 poll top 100 position: 32 (Change -11)
Biggest fans: DaveC(2), Charlie Driggs(5)

DaveC: Gil Scott-Heron covered it, Jamie xx remixed that cover. Then Drake and Rihanna reworked it into "Take Care". The original is best though.



42. Sarah Vaughan - Lullabye of Birdland

Year of release: 1955
Points: 183.15
Voters: 7
AM 50s Songs Rank: Unranked
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: Honorio(12)

DaveC: “Lullaby Of Birdland” is a tune written by George Shearing in 1952 in honor of Charlie Parker and “Birdland” the jazz club named after him. Lyrics were written by George David Weiss. Sarah Vaughan recorded the first of many versions.



41. George Brassens - La mauvaise réputation

Year of release: 1952
Points: 185.73
Voters: 5
AM 50s Songs Rank: 239 (4029 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 27 (Change -14)
Biggest fans: nicolas(8), Honorio(4)

Honorio: Protest songs can be funny. Brassens wrote a semi-autobiographical song with "La mauvaise réputation" ("Bad Reputation") about growing up in a little village feeling different to other people. And he made it his signature piece, an humorous anarchist chant. Good folks don't like it if you take a different road than they do. Except the mute, armless, legless and blind.

DaveC
Die Mensch Maschine
Posts: 1147
Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2013 12:04 am

Re: AMF 1950s Song Poll Results

Postby DaveC » Sun Dec 04, 2016 6:10 pm

40. Bo Diddley - Bo Diddley

Year of release: 1955
Points: 192.44
Voters: 11
AM 50s Songs Rank: 22 (203 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 36 (Change -4)
Biggest fans: Dan(17)

nicolas: Bo D is very special in the rnr landscape, because he brought carribean influences to the music with its distinctive beat and the great Jerome Geen's percussions. He just knew from his Delta background that the guitar could be used as a rhythm instrument, almost as a percussion. John Lee Hooker did it before him, and amplification adds a lot.



39. The Platters - The Great Pretender

Year of release: 1955
Points: 195.71
Voters: 8
AM 50s Songs Rank: 65 (802 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 64 (Change +25)
Biggest fans: Henry(18), andyd1010(2)

Wikipedia: Buck Ram (the Platters' manager and producer) reports that he wrote the song in about 20 minutes in the washroom of the Flamingo Hotel in order to have a song to follow up the success of "Only You (And You Alone)".



38. Elvis Presley - Don't Be Cruel
Image
Year of release: 1956
Points: 197.85
Voters: 7
AM 50s Songs Rank: 21 (197 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 45 (Change +7)
Biggest fans: Henry(7)

Songfacts: This was released as a single with "Hound Dog." It is the only single in history to have both sides reach #1 in the US.

Wikipedia: "Don't Be Cruel" was the first song that Presley's song publishers, Hill and Range, brought to him to record. Otis Blackwell was more than happy to give up 50% of the royalties and a co-writing credit to Presley to ensure that the "hottest new singer around covered it".



37. Frankie Lymon & the Teenagers - Why Do Fools Fall In Love?

Year of release: 1955
Points: 204.38
Voters: 7
AM 50s Songs Rank: 23 (228 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: Miguel(6), Listyguy(9)

Rolling Stone: Frankie Lymon was one of rock & roll’s first teen prodigies — and one of its earliest tragedies. Lymon wrote and sang this hit as a 13-year-old Harlem kid. But the writing credit — and money — went to his label boss, Morris Levy, an associate of the Genovese family. Lymon died a penniless heroin addict in 1968 at the age of 25.



36. Jackie Wilson - Lonely Teardrops

Year of release: 1958
Points: 204.55
Voters: 5
AM 50s Songs Rank: 73 (898 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 71 (Change +35)
Biggest fans: Bruno(18), jamieW(4), andyd1010(9)

Wikipedia: The song raced up to number one on the Billboard R&B chart and became Wilson's first top ten hit on the Billboard Hot 100, eventually peaking at number seven. It was originally intended by Berry Gordy to be recorded as a ballad. After recording it, Wilson and Brunswick executives felt the song lacked something. It was then given to veteran Decca Records arranger Dick Jacobs who re-arranged it into the smash hit it became.



35. The Everly Brothers - Bye Bye Love

Year of release: 1957
Points: 210.65
Voters: 10
AM 50s Songs Rank: 27 (265 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 48 (Change +13)
Biggest fans: Miguel(13), andyd1010(14)

Songfacts: About 30 other artists had previously rejected this song before The Everly Brothers recorded it. It became their first hit in both the UK and US.



34. The Isley Brothers - Shout

Year of release: 1959
Points: 211.13
Voters: 9
AM 50s Songs Rank: 40 (415 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: Bruno(16), andyd1010(10)

Wikipedia: Released in 1959, it was written by the brothers themselves as a call and response answer to Jackie Wilson's "Lonely Teardrops", which they would occasionally cover in live performances.

Ronald Isley: During one of our performances at the Uptown Theater, I was singing “Lonely Teardrops” when I saw that everyone in the audience was standing up and really getting into it. The place was packed and the audience was yelling their approval, like at church. The energy level was so strong that I didn’t want to end the song yet. I began to ad-lib, the way Jackie did: “You know…you make me wanna shout” and the band picked right up on it with that galloping beat. The people standing went crazy, and I began to ad-lib more lines, like “Kick my heels up” and “Throw my hands up.” I’d wait a second at the end of each line so my brothers and the audience had a chance to answer me with “Shout!” That song just took over. But “Shout” didn’t end there. We had 10 more days to go on our revue, and audiences were coming to the theater and waiting for the song at the end. As our run continued, I began developing the song. Ray Charles’ 1954 recording, “I Got a Woman,” was a big inspiration. He had opened his song with a big drawn-out “We-eee-ll,” and at the end he’d go into these gospel chord changes and a call-and-response thing with the band. He’d sing, “And don’t you know she’s all right, yeah.” We went along with that on “Shout,” with me singing, “Don’t forget to say you will” and my brothers answering me with, “Say you will” and “Say it.” Then I sang, “Come on, now” over and over. We really got everyone going.



33. Chuck Berry - Roll Over Beethoven

Year of release: 1956
Points: 212.17
Voters: 10
AM 50s Songs Rank: 26 (252 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 25 (Change -8)
Biggest fans: Bruno(17), andyd1010(13)

Songfacts: Berry was careful to write lyrics that told a coherent story, which in this case follows a young man as he pursues his favorite music. Berry also took care to deliver his lyrics clearly so a wider audience could understand them. This helped him avoid the fate of many Little Richard songs: more popular, but sanitized covers by Pat Boone.



32. The Everly Brothers - Wake Up Little Susie

Year of release: 1957
Points: 219.49
Voters: 8
AM 50s Songs Rank: 39 (384 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: bonnielaurel(16), Miguel(15), Listyguy(20)

Songfacts: This is about a young couple who fall asleep at the drive-in, realize they are out past curfew, and make up a story to tell Susie's parents. Some Boston radio stations banned this because of the lyrics, which imply that the young couple spent the night together. At the time, staying out late with a girl was a little controversial. At an appearance on The Oprah Winfrey Show while campaigning for President in year 2000, George W. Bush was asked by Oprah what his favorite song was. He said: "Wake Up Little Susie - by Buddy Holly."



31. Little Richard - Good Golly Miss Molly
Image
Year of release: 1958
Points: 227.5
Voters: 8
AM 50s Songs Rank: 37 (367 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 21 (Change -10)
Biggest fans: Dan(2), Brad(12)

Rolling Stone: Little Richard first heard the phrase "Good golly, Miss Molly," from a Southern DJ named Jimmy Pennick. He turned the words into perhaps his most blatant assault on American propriety: "Good golly, Miss Molly/You sure like to ball." He swiped the music from Ike Turner's piano intro to Jackie Brenston's "Rocket 88," recorded by Sam Phillips in Memphis seven years earlier. "I always liked that record," Richard recalled, "and I used to use the riff in my act, so when we were looking for a lead-in to 'Good Golly, Miss Molly,' I did that and it fit."

User avatar
Listyguy
Die Mensch Maschine
Posts: 1625
Joined: Sun Feb 05, 2012 8:34 pm

Re: AMF 1950s Song Poll Results

Postby Listyguy » Sun Dec 04, 2016 6:43 pm

DaveC wrote:37. Frankie Lymon & the Teenagers - Why Do Fools Fall In Love?
...
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY


How did this one miss out on the top 100 last time? I guess 1955 gave it some tough competition...

Fun story about my relationship with this song: For the longest time I was very passive about it, not necessarily disliking it but not really liking it either. However, right around when I started listening to songs for this poll, I "saw the light" with this one. It's incredibly catchy. On top of that, the fact Lymon was only 13 at the time makes this song all the more impressive...he really was the predecessor to Michael Jackson in that regard.

DaveC
Die Mensch Maschine
Posts: 1147
Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2013 12:04 am

Re: AMF 1950s Song Poll Results

Postby DaveC » Mon Dec 05, 2016 4:19 am

30. Jerry Lee Lewis - Great Balls of Fire

Year of release: 1957
Points: 227.56
Voters: 8
AM 50s Songs Rank: 14 (130 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 13 (Change -17)
Biggest fans: Bruno(8), Dexter(16), jamieW(16)

nicolas: He and Little Richard were both sides of the same coin. I can't think of one without seeing the other. A homosexual and a redneck, both terrified by the religious guilt that their music caused to them. But that tension was responsible of some of the most fiery performances ever waxed on records.



29. Big Mama Thornton - Hound Dog

Year of release: 1953
Points: 239.6
Voters: 7
AM 50s Songs Rank: 51 (604 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 9 (Change -20)
Biggest fans: Miguel(16), Listyguy(2), Charlie Driggs(20)

Wikipedia: Leiber regarded the original recording by the 350-pound "blues belter" Big Mama Thornton as his favorite version, while Stoller said, "If I had to name my favorite recordings, I'd say they are Big Mama Thornton's 'Hound Dog' and Peggy Lee's 'Is That All There Is?'"



28. Elmore James - Dust My Broom

Year of release: 1951
Points: 243.08
Voters: 11
AM 50s Songs Rank: 59 (735 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 52 (Change +24)
Biggest fans: Dan(5)

nicolas: "(AMG quote) "Nervous and unsure of his abilities as a recording artist, Elmore was surreptitiously recorded by Lillian McMurray of Trumpet Records at the tail end of a Sonny Boy session doing his now-signature tune, "Dust My Broom." Legend has it that James didn't even stay around long enough to hear the playback, much less record a second side." Well, not too bad for an unsure musician !! He does even better IMO than Robert Johnson."



27. Muddy Waters - Hoochie Coochie Man

Year of release: 1954
Points: 245.07
Voters: 6
AM 50s Songs Rank: 28 (277 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 82 (Change +55)
Biggest fans: Dan(16), DaveC(9), Listyguy(3)

AllMusic: Waters employs his famous staggered, stop-and-start beat for the song, a dramatic stomp pattern that was recycled by him and (songwriter) Willie Dixon for various other songs, including "Mannish Boy," and borrowed by Bo Diddley on his "I'm a Man."



26. Carl Perkins - Blue Suede Shoes

Year of release: 1956
Points: 256.12
Voters: 6
AM 50s Songs Rank: 11 (97 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: Bruno(13), Dexter(12), Honorio(3), Henry(9)

Honorio: Rockabilly. "Country musicians playing their own version of uptempo Rhythm & Blues music" according to RYM. This sound with "driving guitars, frantic vocals and slap-back echo in the bass" originated at Sam Phillips' Sun Studios and was going to define the 1950s sound in the long run. Carl Perkins' signature tune (and Elvis' "Mystery Train") are for me the peaks of the style.



25. Eddie Cochran - Summertime Blues

Year of release: 1958
Points: 257.9
Voters: 12
AM 50s Songs Rank: 9 (92 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 18 (Change -7)
Biggest fans: Bruno(19), Dexter(11)

nicolas: The archetypal 50s song, witty, made with almost nothing (a guitar riff), with these lyrics that just capture their time and their public (teens).



24. Howlin' Wolf - Smokestack Lightnin'

Year of release: 1956
Points: 262.36
Voters: 10
AM 50s Songs Rank: 47 (531 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 22 (Change -2)
Biggest fans: sonofsamiam(15), nicolas(18), jamieW(6)

Wikipedia: Wolf had performed "Smokestack Lightning" in one form or another at least by the early 1930s. In Chicago in January 1956, Howlin' Wolf recorded "Smokestack Lightning". The song takes the form of "a propulsive, one-chord vamp, nominally in E major but with the flatted blue notes that make it sound like E minor", and lyrically it is "a pastiche of ancient blues lines and train references, timeless and evocative". Longtime Wolf guitarist Hubert Sumlin is credited with the distinctive guitar line.



23. Fats Domino - Blueberry Hill

Year of release: 1956
Points: 273.49
Voters: 10
AM 50s Songs Rank: 19 (180 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: Bruno(15), nicolas(20), andyd1010(5)

Rolling Stone: "Blueberry Hill" was first recorded in 1940 by several artists, including Gene Autry and Glenn Miller. But Domino drew on the 1949 Louis Armstrong version when he had run out of material at a session. Producer Bartholomew thought it was a terrible idea but lost the argument. Good thing, too. It ended up being Domino's biggest hit and broadened his audience once and for all. As Carl Perkins later said, "In the white honky-tonks where I was playin', they were punchin' 'Blueberry Hill.' And white cats were dancin' to Fats Domino."

DaveC: Third highest new entry.



22. Julie London - Cry Me a River

Year of release: 1955
Points: 288.63
Voters: 8
AM 50s Songs Rank: 81 (995 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: bonnielaurel(10), DaveC(1), nicolas(15), jamieW(11)

Wikipedia: "Cry Me a River" was originally written for Ella Fitzgerald to sing in the film, Pete Kelly's Blues (released 1955), but the song was dropped. Fitzgerald first released a recording of the song on Clap Hands, Here Comes Charlie! in 1961. The song was also offered to Peggy King, but Columbia Records A&R chief Mitch Miller objected to the word "plebeian" in the lyric and its first release was by actress/singer Julie London on Liberty Records in 1955, backed by Barney Kessel on guitar and Ray Leatherwood on bass. A performance of the song by London in the 1956 film The Girl Can't Help It helped to make it a bestseller'.

DaveC: Second higest new entry!



21. Frank Sinatra - I've Got You Under My Skin

Year of release: 1956
Points: 293.98
Voters: 7
AM 50s Songs Rank: 52 (609 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 30 (Change +9)
Biggest fans: bonnielaurel(3), Bruno(14), Dexter(15), Honorio(11)

Honorio: Legend says that the musicians stood up and applauded after playing for the first time the arrangement that Nelson Riddle did for the immortal Cole Porter tune. Understandable, they've just recorded probably the best arrangement for a Big Band ever.
Last edited by DaveC on Mon Dec 05, 2016 8:35 am, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
prosecutorgodot
Different Class
Posts: 481
Joined: Tue Apr 14, 2015 5:53 am
Location: San Francisco, California

Re: AMF 1950s Song Poll Results

Postby prosecutorgodot » Mon Dec 05, 2016 6:29 am

Julie London's voice is sexy as f***, but I have never found any particular song to stand out, including "Cry Me a River".

User avatar
Honorio
Die Mensch Maschine
Posts: 1407
Joined: Sat Feb 11, 2012 7:38 am
Location: L'Eliana, Valencia, Spain

Re: AMF 1950s Song Poll Results

Postby Honorio » Mon Dec 05, 2016 6:38 am

Listyguy wrote:
DaveC wrote:37. Frankie Lymon & the Teenagers - Why Do Fools Fall In Love?

How did this one miss out on the top 100 last time? I guess 1955 gave it some tough competition....

If I remember well that was related then with a confusing release date, December of 1955, that splitted the votes (originally it was featured on Acclaimed Music as 1956).

User avatar
Dexter
Different Class
Posts: 349
Joined: Mon Apr 27, 2015 5:04 am

Re: AMF 1950s Song Poll Results

Postby Dexter » Mon Dec 05, 2016 6:50 am

Just a small quibble, I think that's Dennis Quaid in the picture for "Great Balls of Fire." Quaid starred as Jerry Lee Lewis in the movie 'Great Balls of Fire.'

...can't hardly wait for the top 20 and for the 1900-1949 list.

DaveC
Die Mensch Maschine
Posts: 1147
Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2013 12:04 am

Re: AMF 1950s Song Poll Results

Postby DaveC » Mon Dec 05, 2016 8:41 am

Dexter wrote:Just a small quibble, I think that's Dennis Quaid in the picture for "Great Balls of Fire." Quaid starred as Jerry Lee Lewis in the movie 'Great Balls of Fire.'




Fixed! He was a decent likeness though wasn't he? At least that is the best excuse I can muster.

User avatar
Bruno
Rust Never Sleeps
Posts: 937
Joined: Sun Feb 19, 2012 1:33 pm
Location: São Paulo, Brasil
Contact:

Re: AMF 1950s Song Poll Results

Postby Bruno » Mon Dec 05, 2016 2:12 pm

Looking forward to the top 20! :music-listening:

DaveC
Die Mensch Maschine
Posts: 1147
Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2013 12:04 am

Re: AMF 1950s Song Poll Results

Postby DaveC » Mon Dec 05, 2016 6:19 pm

20. Miles Davis - So What

Year of release: 1959
Points: 303.9
Voters: 11
AM 50s Songs Rank: 53 (618 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 11 (Change -9)
Biggest fans: sonofsamiam(2), Dexter(18), jamieW(9)

Thomas Ward for AllMusic: With a long introduction from bassist Paul Chambers culminating in Davis’ quintessential modal, minimalist solo, “So What” has become something of a blue print for all modal jazz. Indeed, the track is so laid back, thanks mostly to Jimmy Cobb’s drumming, that it’s the very essence of “cool jazz”. The rhythmic style is very free, and although the structure is simple, it reveals new complexities and subtleties in each listen.



19. Elvis Presley - That's All Right

Year of release: 1954
Points: 305.33
Voters: 11
AM 50s Songs Rank: 10 (96 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 23 (Change +4)
Biggest fans: Brad(20), Live in Phoenix(2), nicolas(16)

nicolas: The very first cut is the deepest. I'm one of those Sun sessions fan. That sound is just incredible, and the musicians express themselves freely. Then Elvis, little by little, became one more pop idol, some sort of standardized good for the American market.



18. Elvis Presley - Mystery Train

Year of release: 1955
Points: 308.69
Voters: 9
AM 50s Songs Rank: 17 (146 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 5 (Change -13)
Biggest fans: Listyguy(6), Honorio(1), jamieW(10)

Honorio: At 1'46" Elvis jumps right in and begins to sing the melody a little too early. Any other producer could have insisted in recording another take. But not Sam Philips. The important thing for Phillips (and for Elvis!) was not the perfection, it was the spontaneity, the feeling, the uniqueness, they aimed to capture the moment. That's how they invented Rock & Roll. No less.



17. Johnny Cash - I Walk the Line

Year of release: 1956
Points: 345.95
Voters: 11
AM 50s Songs Rank: 16 (136 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 8 (Change -9)
Biggest fans: Bruno(20), Dexter(6), Brad(16), jamieW(5), andyd1010(12)

Songfacts: It is a promise to remain faithful to his first wife, Vivian, while he is on the road.



16. Screamin' Jay Hawkins - I Put a Spell on You

Year of release: 1956
Points: 355.55
Voters: 12
AM 50s Songs Rank: 29 (291 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: - NEW ENTRY
Biggest fans: Dan(15), Charlie Driggs(3), jamieW(1)

Wikipedia: Hawkins had originally intended to record "I Put a Spell on You" as "a refined love song, a blues ballad". However, the producer "brought in ribs and chicken and got everybody drunk, and we came out with this weird version ... I don't even remember making the record. Before, I was just a normal blues singer. I was just Jay Hawkins. It all sort of just fell in place. I found out I could do more destroying a song and screaming it to death."

DaveC: Our highest new entry. Hawkins version never charted - although cover versions have done.



15. Johnny Cash - Folsom Prison Blues

Year of release: 1955
Points: 359.34
Voters: 10
AM 50s Songs Rank: 20 (183 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 6 (Change -9)
Biggest fans: sonofsamiam(8), DaveC(6), nicolas(9)

nicolas: Two of the main subjects of pre-war blues and country music (prisons and trains) in one song, with this new rockabilly song written by a GI from Arkansas in Germany. The beginning of a great legend.



14. Elvis Presley - Hound Dog

Year of release: 1956
Points: 368.12
Voters: 9
AM 50s Songs Rank: 7 (74 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 35 (Change +21)
Biggest fans: Bruno(6), Miguel(8), Dexter(3), Henry(10), andyd1010(11)

Wikipedia: "Hound Dog" has been recorded more than 250 times. The best-known version of "Hound Dog" is the July 1956 recording by Elvis Presley. Presley's version, which sold about 10 million copies globally, was his best-selling song and "an emblem of the rock 'n' roll revolution". It was simultaneously No. 1 on the US pop, country, and R&B charts in 1956, and it topped the pop chart for 11 weeks — a record that stood for 36 years.



13. The Everly Brothers - All I Have to Do Is Dream

Year of release: 1958
Points: 375.89
Voters: 10
AM 50s Songs Rank: 33 (327 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 26 (Change +13)
Biggest fans: Listyguy(4), Brad(11), Live in Phoenix(8), andyd1010(7)

Phil Everly: I remember hearing 'All I Have To Do Is Dream' on an acetate with Boudleaux's version on it, and I said, at the time, they could have put Boudleaux's out and it would have been a hit. It's just a great, great song. It's beautiful. Boudleaux was the main man who wrote all the great songs for us, and we love him.



12. Chuck Berry - Maybelline

Year of release: 1955
Points: 378.13
Voters: 10
AM 50s Songs Rank: 12 (101 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 24 (Change +12)
Biggest fans: Miguel(3), Listyguy(17), Live in Phoenix(15), Henry(8), andyd1010(15)

Rolling Stone: Rock & roll guitar starts here. The pileup of hillbilly country, urban blues and hot jazz in Chuck Berry's electric twang is the primal language of pop- music guitar, and it's all perfected on his first single. The entire song is a two-minute chase scene packed with car-culture vernacular and Berry's hipster-lingo inventions ("As I was motorvatin' over the hill. . . ."). Its groove comes from "Ida Red," a 1938 recording by Bob Wills and His Texas Playboys (of a song that dates back to the 19th century). By the time of the May 21st, 1955, session, Berry had been playing country tunes for black audiences for a few years — "After they laughed at me a few times, they began requesting the hillbilly stuff," he has said. Leonard Chess came up with the title, inspired by a Maybelline mascara box lying on the floor at the Chess studio. DJ Alan Freed had nothing to do with writing "Maybellene," although he got co-credit and royalties for years in return for radio airplay: payola in all but name.



11. Little Richard - Long Tall Sally

Year of release: 1956
Points: 419.95
Voters: 12
AM 50s Songs Rank: 32 (321 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 17 (Change +6)
Biggest fans: Bruno(12), Listyguy(1), nicolas(11), jamieW(18)

Rolling Stone: "Long Tall Sally" was aimed squarely at pop singer Pat Boone. "The white radio stations wouldn't play Richard's version of 'Tutti-Frutti' and made Boone's cover Number One," recalled (producer Richard) Blackwell. "So we decided to up the tempo on the follow-up and get the lyrics going so fast that Boone wouldn't be able to get his mouth together to do it!" "Long Tall Sally" proved to be Little Richard's biggest hit. Unfazed, Boone also recorded the song, taking it to Number Eight.

Henry
Die Mensch Maschine
Posts: 1010
Joined: Thu Feb 09, 2012 9:39 pm

Re: AMF 1950s Song Poll Results

Postby Henry » Mon Dec 05, 2016 9:40 pm

Is there any chance that one of the following songs makes the top ten?

Woody Guthrie - This Land is Your Land
Bo Diddley - Who Do You Love?
Muddy Waters - Manish Boy
Jackie Brenston - Rocket 88
Jacques Brel - Ne me quitte pas

DaveC
Die Mensch Maschine
Posts: 1147
Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2013 12:04 am

Re: AMF 1950s Song Poll Results

Postby DaveC » Mon Dec 05, 2016 9:59 pm

Henry wrote:Is there any chance that one of the following songs makes the top ten?

Woody Guthrie - This Land is Your Land


This one is in our 1900-1947 top 100.

User avatar
Listyguy
Die Mensch Maschine
Posts: 1625
Joined: Sun Feb 05, 2012 8:34 pm

Re: AMF 1950s Song Poll Results

Postby Listyguy » Tue Dec 06, 2016 1:17 am

Henry wrote:Is there any chance that one of the following songs makes the top ten?

Woody Guthrie - This Land is Your Land
Bo Diddley - Who Do You Love?
Muddy Waters - Manish Boy
Jackie Brenston - Rocket 88
Jacques Brel - Ne me quitte pas


"Ne me quitte pas" is almost certainly in the top 10

DaveC
Die Mensch Maschine
Posts: 1147
Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2013 12:04 am

Re: AMF 1950s Song Poll Results

Postby DaveC » Tue Dec 06, 2016 5:28 am

10. Little Richard - Tutti Frutti

Year of release: 1955
Points: 430.44
Voters: 11
AM 50s Songs Rank: 4 (34 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 15 (Change +5)
Biggest fans: Dan(20), Bruno(4), Dexter(10), Brad(9), Live in Phoenix(10), andyd1010(16)

Little Richard: A-wop-bom-a-loo-mop-a-lomp-bom-bom!!



9. Nina Simone - My Baby Just Cares for Me
Image
Year of release: 1958
Points: 435.64
Voters: 11
AM 50s Songs Rank: 91 (1231 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 33 (Change +24)
Biggest fans: bonnielaurel(1), Dan(10), DaveC(8), Brad(2), nicolas(19), Honorio(10)

Honorio: The great success of this song in the mid-80s, almost 30 years after it came out, can be explained (apart by the funny video-clip) because great music is always timeless, because styles are less important that substance. Nina Simone always jumped easily between styles, between Jazz, Blues, Soul, Gospel, Pop and Classical. And boarding all of them with... style.



8. Buddy Holly & The Crickets - That'll Be the Day

Year of release: 1957
Points: 462.33
Voters: 11
AM 50s Songs Rank: 5 (63 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 16 (Change +8)
Biggest fans: Bruno(7), Miguel(10), Dexter(7), Henry(11), jamieW(15), andyd1010(8)

Songfacts: Holly had been kicking around his home town in Lubbock, Texas trying to write a hit song for his small rockabilly band since he had attended an Elvis Presley gig at his High School some time in 1955. His band in those days consisted of him on lead vocals and guitar, Jerry Allison on the drums and Joe B. Maudlin on upright bass. He and Jerry decided to get together and go see The Searchers a Western movie staring John Wayne. In the movie, Wayne keeps replying "That'll be the day" every time another character in the film predicts or proclaims something will happen when he felt it was not likely to happen. The phrase stuck in Jerry's mind, and when they were hanging out at Jerry's house one night, Buddy looked at Jerry and said that it sure would be nice if they could record a hit song. Jerry replied with, "That'll be the day," mocking John Wayne in the western.



7. Elvis Presley - Heartbreak Hotel
Image
Year of release: 1956
Points: 464.66
Voters: 11
AM 50s Songs Rank: 2 (19 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 10 (Change +3)
Biggest fans: Dan(7), Bruno(10), DaveC(20), Dexter(13), jamieW(2), andyd1010(4)

DaveC: Widely, but inaccurately, reported to be about a suicide. Actually, derived from a front page article in the El Paso Herald-Post on August 25th, 1955: Killing Ends Heartache 'Story of person who walked lonely street'. Concerning Alvin Krolik whose heartbreak over his failed marriage to nightclub accordionist Agnes Sampson sent him into a criminal spiral that lead eventually to his being shot by the owner of a liquor store he was attempting to rob at gun-point.



6. Dave Brubeck Quartet - Take Five
Image
Year of release: 1959
Points: 498.76
Voters: 13
AM 50s Songs Rank: 70 (864 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 2 (Change -4)
Biggest fans: Dan(14), DaveC(4), Listyguy(5), Honorio(6), Henry(4)

Honorio: Despite being played a billion times as background music in cafés (and elevators and dentist offices) the song hasn't lost any ounce of its greatness, of its natural sophistication (if I'm allowed to put together those antagonistic words). Probably it's because it creates an easy mood not being at the core easy at all, it simultaneously stimulates and relaxes your brain.


Resisting the temptation to drop any clues about the top 5 - come back in 13 hours.

User avatar
Dexter
Different Class
Posts: 349
Joined: Mon Apr 27, 2015 5:04 am

Re: AMF 1950s Song Poll Results

Postby Dexter » Tue Dec 06, 2016 6:15 am

DaveC wrote:
Dexter wrote:Just a small quibble, I think that's Dennis Quaid in the picture for "Great Balls of Fire." Quaid starred as Jerry Lee Lewis in the movie 'Great Balls of Fire.'

Fixed! He was a decent likeness though wasn't he? At least that is the best excuse I can muster.

Indeed, the likeness is eerie-good.

DaveC wrote:7. Elvis Presley - Heartbreak Hotel
DaveC: Widely, but inaccurately, reported to be about a suicide. Actually, derived from a front page article in the El Paso Herald-Post on August 25th, 1955: Killing Ends Heartache 'Story of person who walked lonely street'. Concerning Alvin Krolik whose heartbreak over his failed marriage to nightclub accordionist Agnes Sampson sent him into a criminal spiral that lead eventually to his being shot by the owner of a liquor store he was attempting to rob at gun-point.

Nice job here Dave, the origins of "Heartbreak Hotel" was the subject of an excellent Rolling Stone article. Very interesting read for music fans. You can read it by clicking the link below:
http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/ ... reak-hotel

Henry
Die Mensch Maschine
Posts: 1010
Joined: Thu Feb 09, 2012 9:39 pm

Re: AMF 1950s Song Poll Results

Postby Henry » Tue Dec 06, 2016 7:56 am

My second guess for the top 5:

1. Chuck Berry, Johnny B. Goode
2. Ray Charles, What'd I Say
3. Elvis Presley, Jailhouse Rock
4. Jacque Brelle, Ne me quitte pas
5. Bill Haley, Rock Around the Clock
Last edited by Henry on Tue Dec 06, 2016 12:22 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
Rob
Rust Never Sleeps
Posts: 851
Joined: Fri Jul 06, 2012 3:53 pm

Re: AMF 1950s Song Poll Results

Postby Rob » Tue Dec 06, 2016 10:35 am

Henry wrote:My guess for the top 5:
(...)
3. Little RIchard, Tutti


Unless this is another song than Tutti Frutti I have to disappoint you and say that is one has already appeared at ten.
But don't worry, there is still room for the Pat Boone cover! And while we're at it, lets also add the Long Tall Sally cover by Boone!

Seriously, the one you're missing is probably What'd I Say by Ray Charles.

DaveC
Die Mensch Maschine
Posts: 1147
Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2013 12:04 am

Re: AMF 1950s Song Poll Results

Postby DaveC » Tue Dec 06, 2016 6:10 pm

5. Jacques Brel - Ne me quitte pas

Year of release: 1959
Points: 506.39
Voters: 10
AM 50s Songs Rank: 46 (523 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 7 (Change +2)
Biggest fans: bonnielaurel(4), Dan(4), Miguel(5), DaveC(3), Listyguy(10), Dexter(19), Honorio(9)

Honorio: It's impossible to write a deeper and more desperate plea for love. It's impossible to go as high as these unreachable promises ("I'll offer you rain pearls coming from countries where it never rains") and as low as this pitiful humiliation ("Let me become (…) the shadow of your dog"). And it's impossible to perform it with more passion and emotional involvement. Don't leave him.



4. Elvis Presley - Jailhouse Rock
Image
Year of release: 1957
Points: 520.65
Voters: 12
AM 50s Songs Rank: 15 (135 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 31 (Change +27)
Biggest fans: bonnielaurel(7), Dan(19), Bruno(5), Listyguy(15), Live in Phoenix(11), jamieW(14), andyd1010(6)

Wikipedia: According to Rolling Stone, Leiber and Stoller's "theme song for Presley's third movie was decidedly silly, the kind of tongue-in-cheek goof they had come up with for The Coasters. The King, however, sang it as straight rock & roll, overlooking the jokes in the lyrics (like the suggestion of gay romance when inmate Number 47 tells Number 3, 'You're the cutest jailbird I ever did see') and then introducing Scotty Moore's guitar solo with a cry so intense that the take almost collapses." Gender studies scholars cite the song for "its famous reference to homoerotics behind bars," while music critic Garry Mulholland writes, "'Jailhouse Rock' was always a queer lyric, in both senses." Douglas Brode writes of the filmed production number that it's "amazing that the sequence passed by the censors".



3. Bill Haley & His Comets - (We're Gonna) Rock Around the Clock

Year of release: 1954
Points: 527.21
Voters: 12
AM 50s Songs Rank: 6 (73 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 14 (Change +11)
Biggest fans: Bruno(2), Miguel(2), Dexter(4), Henry(3)

nicolas: Bill Haley invented a lot of things, but he was not sexy, he was from the old world and nothing distinguished him from another country performer. Still he put together rock'n'roll. This song has been played a zillion times, lots of people danced and are still dancing on it, and it is still a great listening experience.

DaveC
Die Mensch Maschine
Posts: 1147
Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2013 12:04 am

Re: AMF 1950s Song Poll Results

Postby DaveC » Tue Dec 06, 2016 8:26 pm

"Kind of Blue" took our 1950s album poll by a large margin. Our song of the 1950s wins by an even larger margin.



2. Ray Charles - What'd I Say
Image
Year of release: 1959
Points: 590.44
Voters: 10
AM 50s Songs Rank: 3 (32 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 3 (Change +1)
Biggest fans: Dan(18), Bruno(3), Listyguy(7), Dexter(5), nicolas(3), Henry(12), jamieW(3), andyd1010(3)

nicolas: Made out of an improvisation, this song is the best Ray did during those key years when he - with a handful of other musicians- united gospel and blues in a sort of unholy embrace that would change the face of black music.



1. Chuck Berry - Johnny B. Goode

Year of release: 1958
Points: 912.66
Voters: 14
AM 50s Songs Rank: 1 (9 all time)
2010 poll top 100 position: 1 (No change)
Biggest fans: Dan(1), Bruno(1), Listyguy(8), Dexter(2), Live in Phoenix(6), nicolas(7), Honorio(2), Henry(1), jamieW(7), andyd1010(1)

Chuck Berry: "The original words [were], of course, 'That little colored boy could play.' I changed it to 'country boy' or else it wouldn't get on the radio."

User avatar
Dan
Rust Never Sleeps
Posts: 717
Joined: Fri Feb 10, 2012 4:41 am
Location: Newcastle, England

Re: AMF 1950s Song Poll Results

Postby Dan » Tue Dec 06, 2016 8:48 pm

Splendid work. I'm pleased to see "Johnny B. Goode" retain its title as our #1 song of the 1950s. Go, Johnny, go!

And thanks, DaveC, for saving the best for last. I'm sure the 1900-1949 songs results will be fab.
Let's make this a good year.

jamieW
Die Mensch Maschine
Posts: 1072
Joined: Sat Oct 27, 2012 9:19 pm

Re: AMF 1950s Song Poll Results

Postby jamieW » Tue Dec 06, 2016 9:36 pm

Thanks so much, DaveC - the presentation was outstanding from beginning to end (including the pacing)! I'm looking really forward to the 1900-49 songs. (And I agree with Dan - this is saving the best for last!)

User avatar
Dexter
Different Class
Posts: 349
Joined: Mon Apr 27, 2015 5:04 am

Re: AMF 1950s Song Poll Results

Postby Dexter » Wed Dec 07, 2016 12:27 am

Same with the albums result, excellent job DaveC! The members of this forums have great taste in music. Eager to find out the songs outside the top 100 and also for the 1900-1949 songs which from my observation will be very diverse and eclectic.

User avatar
Listyguy
Die Mensch Maschine
Posts: 1625
Joined: Sun Feb 05, 2012 8:34 pm

Re: AMF 1950s Song Poll Results

Postby Listyguy » Wed Dec 07, 2016 2:00 am

I will echo everyone's appreciation for this poll; it was great! I also agree the best is yet to come though!

DaveC
Die Mensch Maschine
Posts: 1147
Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2013 12:04 am

Re: AMF 1950s Song Poll Results

Postby DaveC » Wed Dec 07, 2016 3:31 am

The full list:-

1 | Chuck Berry | Johnny B. Goode | 1958
2 | Ray Charles | What'd I Say | 1959
3 | Bill Haley & His Comets | (We're Gonna) Rock Around the Clock | 1954
4 | Elvis Presley | Jailhouse Rock | 1957
5 | Jacques Brel | Ne me quitte pas | 1959
6 | Dave Brubeck Quartet | Take Five | 1959
7 | Elvis Presley | Heartbreak Hotel | 1956
8 | Buddy Holly & The Crickets | That'll Be the Day | 1957
9 | Nina Simone | My Baby Just Cares for Me | 1958
10 | Little Richard | Tutti Frutti | 1955
11 | Little Richard | Long Tall Sally | 1956
12 | Chuck Berry | Maybelline | 1955
13 | The Everly Brothers | All I Have to Do Is Dream | 1958
14 | Elvis Presley | Hound Dog | 1956
15 | Johnny Cash | Folsom Prison Blues | 1955
16 | Screamin' Jay Hawkins | I Put a Spell on You | 1956
17 | Johnny Cash | I Walk the Line | 1956
18 | Elvis Presley | Mystery Train | 1955
19 | Elvis Presley | That's All Right | 1954
20 | Miles Davis | So What | 1959
21 | Frank Sinatra | I've Got You Under My Skin | 1956
22 | Julie London | Cry Me a River | 1955
23 | Fats Domino | Blueberry Hill | 1956
24 | Howlin' Wolf | Smokestack Lightnin' | 1956
25 | Eddie Cochran | Summertime Blues | 1958
26 | Carl Perkins | Blue Suede Shoes | 1956
27 | Muddy Waters | Hoochie Coochie Man | 1954
28 | Elmore James | Dust My Broom | 1951
29 | Big Mama Thornton | Hound Dog | 1953
30 | Jerry Lee Lewis | Great Balls of Fire | 1957
31 | Little Richard | Good Golly Miss Molly | 1958
32 | The Everly Brothers | Wake Up Little Susie | 1957
33 | Chuck Berry | Roll Over Beethoven | 1956
34 | The Isley Brothers | Shout | 1959
35 | The Everly Brothers | Bye Bye Love | 1957
36 | Jackie Wilson | Lonely Teardrops | 1958
37 | Frankie Lymon & the Teenagers | Why Do Fools Fall In Love? | 1955
38 | Elvis Presley | Don't Be Cruel | 1956
39 | The Platters | The Great Pretender | 1955
40 | Bo Diddley | Bo Diddley | 1955
41 | George Brassens | La mauvaise réputation | 1952
42 | Sarah Vaughan | Lullabye of Birdland | 1955
43 | Bobby Bland | I'll Take Care of You | 1959
44 | Fats Domino | Ain't That a Shame | 1955
45 | Peggy Lee | Fever | 1958
46 | Lotte Lenya | Die Moritat von Mackie Messer | 1955
47 | Sam Cooke | You Send Me | 1957
48 | Big Joe Turner | Shake, Rattle and Roll | 1954
49 | Buddy Holly & The Crickets | Peggy Sue | 1957
50 | The Champs | Tequila | 1958
51 | Ritchie Valens | La Bamba | 1958
52 | Chet Baker | My Funny Valentine | 1954
53 | The Flamingos | I Only Have Eyes for You | 1959
54 | Elvis Presley | All Shook Up | 1957
55 | Les Paul & Mary Ford | How High the Moon | 1951
56 | Charles Mingus | Better Git It in Your Soul | 1959
57 | Hank Williams and His Drifting Cowboys | Long Gone Lonesome Blues | 1950
58 | Boris Vian | Le déserteur | 1955
59 | Ray Charles | I've Got a Woman | 1954
60 | Ella Fitzgerald | Ev'ry Time We Say Goodbye | 1956
61 | The Chordettes | Mr. Sandman | 1954
62 | Jerry Lee Lewis | Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin' On | 1957
63 | The Penguins | Earth Angel (Will You Be Mine) | 1954
64 | Buddy Holly & The Crickets | Everyday | 1957
65 | The Platters | Only You (And You Alone) | 1955
66 | The Platters | Smoke Gets In Your Eyes | 1958
67 | Mahalia Jackson | In the Upper Room | 1952
68 | Gene Vincent & His Blue Caps | Be-Bop-A-Lula | 1956
69 | James Brown and the Famous Flames | Please Please Please | 1956
70 | The Chords | Sh-Boom (Life Could Be a Dream) | 1954
71 | Jackie Wilson | Reet Petite (The Finest Girl You Ever Want To Meet) | 1957
72 | Nat King Cole | Unforgettable | 1951
73 | Georges Brassens | La marine | 1953
74 | Pérez Prado and His Orchestra | Mambo No. 5 | 1950
75 | Bobby Darin | Beyond the Sea | 1959
76 | Georges Brassens | Le gorille | 1952
77 | Édith Piaf | La Foule | 1957
78 | Charles Mingus | Pithecanthropus Erectus | 1956
79 | Gene Kelly | Singin' in the Rain | 1952
80 | Little Richard | Lucille | 1957
81 | The Five Satins | In the Still of the Nite | 1956
82 | Le Grand Kallé & l'African Jazz | Ambiance Kallé Catho | 1957
83 | Édith Piaf | Milord | 1959
84 | Henri Salvador | Dans mon île | 1959
85 | Dion | A Teenager in Love | 1959
86 | Bobby Darin | Mack the Knife | 1959
87 | Harry Belafonte | The Banana Boat Song (Day-O) | 1956
88 | Elvis Presley | Love Me Tender | 1956
89 | Moondog | Surf Session | 1956
90 | Buddy Holly & The Crickets | Oh, Boy! | 1957
91 | Astor Piazzolla | Adiós Nonino | 1959
91 | Ella Fitzgerald | I Love Paris | 1956
91 | Frank Sinatra | Where Are You? | 1957
91 | Thelonious Monk | Brilliant Corners | 1957
95 | Dinah Washington | Mad About the Boy | 1952
96 | Karlheinz Stockhausen | Gesang der Jünglinge | 1956
97 | Stan Kenton | City of Glass: Entrance Into The City | 1952
98 | The Drifters | There Goes My Baby | 1959
99 | Iannis Xenakis | Metastasis | 1954
100 | Miles Davis | All Blues | 1959
101 | Mahalia Jackson | I'm Going to Live the Life I Sing About in My Song | 1955
102 | Sabu Martinez | Nadenga | 1957
103 | Link Wray & His Wray Men | Rumble | 1958
104 | Muddy Waters | Rollin' Stone | 1950
105 | Johnny Burnette | The Train Kept-A-Rollin' | 1956
106 | Louis Armstrong | A Kiss to Build a Dream On | 1951
107 | Chuck Berry | Rock and Roll Music | 1957
108 | Jacques Brel | La valse à mille temps | 1959
109 | Ella Fitzgerald & Louis Armstrong | Dream a Little Dream of Me | 1950
110 | Nina Simone | I Loves You, Porgy | 1958
111 | Ray Charles | Come Rain or Come Shine | 1959
112 | Muddy Waters | Mannish Boy | 1955
113 | Ella Fitzgerald and Louis Armstrong | Summertime | 1957
114 | Anita O'Day | Sweet Georgia Brown | 1957
114 | Chet Baker | I Get Along Without You Very Well | 1954
114 | Frank Sinatra | Willow Weep for Me | 1958
117 | The Coasters | Charlie Brown | 1959
118 | Chuck Berry | Memphis, Tennessee | 1959
119 | The Silhouettes | Get a Job | 1958
120 | Bernard Herrmann | Prelude and Rooftop (from Vertigo) | 1958
121 | Aram Khachaturian | Adagio of Spartacus and Phrygia | 1955
122 | Dave Brubeck Quartet | Blue Rondo a la Turk | 1959
123 | Nina Simone | The Other Woman | 1959
124 | Sarah Vaughan | Summertime | 1955
125 | Vince Taylor & The Playboys | Brand New Cadillac | 1959
126 | Nina Simone | Black Is the Color of My True Love's Hair | 1959
127 | Big Bill Broonzy | Black, Brown and White (aka Get Back) | 1951
127 | Georges Brassens | Je m'suis fait tout petit | 1956
129 | Yma Sumac | Ataypura (High Andes) | 1950
130 | Hank Williams and His Drifting Cowboys | Jambalaya (on the Bayou) | 1952
131 | Ray Charles | Hallelujah I Love Her So | 1956
132 | Elvis Presley | Blue Suede Shoes | 1956
133 | Patsy Cline | Walkin' After Midnight | 1957
134 | James Brown | Try Me | 1958
135 | Elvis Presley | Blue Moon | 1956
136 | Lloyd Price | Lawdy Miss Clawdy | 1952
137 | Louis Armstrong | Skokiaan (South African Song) | 1954
138 | João Gilberto | Chega de saudade | 1958
139 | Hank Williams and His Drifting Cowboys | Your Cheatin' Heart | 1953
140 | The Coasters | Yakety Yak | 1958
141 | Jackie Brenston | Rocket 88 | 1951
142 | Édith Piaf | Hymne à l'amour | 1950
142 | Gerry Mulligan Quartet | My Funny Valentine | 1953
142 | Hank Snow | I'm Movin' On | 1950
142 | Hank Williams and His Drifting Cowboys | Why Don't You Love Me | 1950
146 | Yma Sumac | Xtabay (Lure of The Unknown Love) | 1950
147 | Little Willie John | Fever | 1956
148 | Charles Mingus | Haitian Fight Song | 1957
149 | The Skyliners | Since I Don't Have You | 1958
150 | Buddy Holly & The Crickets | Not Fade Away | 1957
151 | Chuck Berry | Sweet Little Sixteen | 1958
152 | Harry Partch | Ulysses Departs From The Edge of The World | 1955
153 | Lloyd Price | Stagger Lee | 1958
154 | Frank Sinatra | In the Wee Small Hours of the Morning | 1955
155 | Pérez Prado | Patricia | 1958
155 | Marion Marlowe | The Man in the Raincoat | 1955
155 | The Teddy Bears | To Know Him Is to Love Him | 1958
158 | Duke Ellington | Diminuendo and Crescendo in Blue | 1956
159 | Tennesse Ernie Ford | Sixteen Tons | 1955
160 | Bo Diddley | Who Do You Love | 1956
161 | Eddie Cochran | Somethin' Else | 1959
162 | Frank Sinatra | Young at Heart | 1954
162 | The Katzenjammers | Love Is a Many Splendored Thing | 1957
164 | Marty Robbins | El Paso | 1959
165 | Duke Ellington | The Tattooed Bride | 1951
166 | Domenico Medugno | Nel blu dipinto di blu (Volare) | 1958
167 | Conway Twitty | It's Only Make Believe | 1958
168 | Duane Eddy | Peter Gunn | 1959
169 | Charles Brown | Black Night | 1951
170 | Hildegard Knef | Das Lied vom einsamen Mädchen | 1952
171 | Bulawayo Sweet Rhythms Band | Skokiaan | 1954
172 | Patsy Cline | Three Cigarettes - In An Ashtray | 1957
173 | Ravi Shankar | Raga Jog | 1956
174 | Elvis Presley | Blue Moon of Kentucky | 1954
175 | Hank Williams and His Drifting Cowboys | I'll Never Get Out of This World Alive | 1952
176 | Little Richard | The Girl Can't Help It | 1956
177 | Buddy Holly & The Crickets | Well All Right | 1958
178 | Frank Sinatra | One for My Baby (and One More for The Road) | 1958
179 | The Diamonds | Little Darlin' | 1957
180 | The Weavers | Kisses Sweeter Than Wine | 1951
181 | Buddy Holly & The Crickets | Rave On | 1958
182 | Frank Sinatra | I Get a Kick Out of You | 1954
183 | Little Richard | Rip It Up | 1956
184 | Big Bill Broonzy | When Did You Leave Heaven | 1950
185 | Jacques Brel | Quand on n'a que l'amour | 1956
186 | Danny & the Juniors | At the Hop | 1958
187 | Bill Monroe & His Blue Grass Boys | Cheyenne | 1955
187 | Georges Brassens | Je suis un voyou | 1955
187 | Martin Denny | The Enchanted Sea | 1959
187 | Thelonious Monk | Straight, No Chaser | 1951
191 | Frank Sinatra | Come Fly With Me | 1958
192 | Ruth Brown | (Mama) He Treats Your Daughter Mean | 1953
193 | Wilbert Harrison | Kansas City | 1959
194 | Barrett Strong | Money (That's What I Want) | 1959
195 | Lord Kitchener | London Is the Place for Me | 1951
196 | Art Blakey & The Jazz Messengers | Blues March | 1958
197 | Ambrose Campbell & West African Rhythm Brothers | Ominira | 1958
197 | Bobby Darin | Splish Splash | 1958
197 | Elizete Cardoso & Luiz Bonfa | Manhã de carnaval | 1959
197 | Elvis Presley | Santa Claus is Back in Town | 1957
197 | Leroy Anderson | The Typewriter | 1950
202 | Nina Simone | Love Me or Leave Me | 1959
203 | The Orioles | Crying In the Chapel | 1953
204 | "My Fair Lady" | On the Street Where You Live | 1956
205 | The Big Bopper | Chantilly Lace | 1958
206 | Ahmad Jamal | Poinciana | 1958
207 | Big Bill Broonzy | Low Land Blues | 1951
207 | Blossom Dearie | Once Upon a Summertime | 1958
207 | Buddy Holly & The Crickets | Crying, Waiting, Hoping | 1959
207 | Elvis Presley | I Want You, I Need You, I Love You | 1956
207 | Elvis Presley | Trouble | 1958
207 | Golden Gate Quartet | Down By the Riverside | 1958
207 | João Gilberto | Desafinado | 1959
207 | Shirley & Lee | Let the Good Times Roll | 1956
215 | Sabu | El Cumbanchero | 1957
216 | Clyde McPhatter & The Drifters | Money Honey | 1953
217 | Carl Stalling | Anxiety Montage | 1952
218 | Dmitri Shostakovich | Jazz Suite: Waltz 2 | 1956
219 | Nina Simone | Plain Gold Ring | 1959
220 | Moondog | Theme and Variations | 1953
221 | Dmitri Shostakovich | Symphony No. 10 in E Minor: III. Allegretto | 1953
221 | Jack Costanzo | Malaguena | 1958
223 | Odetta | John Henry | 1954
224 | Ray Charles | Drown In My Own Tears | 1956
225 | Esquivel | All of Me | 1959
226 | Chuck Berry | School Day | 1957
227 | Nat King Cole | Smile | 1954
228 | Lonnie Donegan | Frankie And Johnny | 1956
228 | ORIGINAL BROADWAY CAST (LARRY KERT & CAROL LAWRENCE) | Somewhere (Ballet) | 1957
230 | The Modern Jazz Quartet | Django | 1956
231 | Blind Blake | John B. Sail | 1952
232 | Kitty Wells | It Wasn't God Who Made Honky Tonk Angels) | 1952
233 | Nina Simone | He Needs Me | 1959
234 | Chuck Berry | Down Bound Train | 1955
234 | Doris Day | Dream a Little Dream of Me | 1957
234 | Edgard Varèse | Déserts | 1954
234 | Henri Salvador | Le Loup, la biche et le chevalier | 1955
234 | Louis Armstrong with Velma Middleton | Long Gone John (From Bowlin' Green) | 1954
239 | Muddy Waters | I Just Wanna Make Love to You | 1954
240 | The Fleetwoods | Come Softly To Me | 1959
241 | Dmitri Shostakovich | Symphony No. 10 In E Minor - II. Allegro | 1953
241 | Ella Fitzgerald & Louis Armstrong | Let's Call the Whole Thing Off | 1957
243 | The Stanley Brothers | I'm a Man of Constant Sorrow | 1951
244 | Ray Charles | I Believe To My Soul | 1959
244 | Billie Holiday | I'm a Fool to Want You | 1958
244 | Milton Babbitt | All Set | 1957
244 | Moondog | Oasis | 1953
244 | Oscar Peterson | Woody'n You | 1959
249 | Ella Fitzgerald | Too Darn Hot | 1956
250 | Paul Anka | Put Your Head on My Shoulder | 1959
251 | Jimmy Rogers | Walking by Myself | 1956
252 | Bobby Freeman | Do You Want To Dance | 1958
253 | Ray Charles | (The Night Time Is) The Right Time | 1958
254 | Bill Evans | Peace Piece | 1959
254 | Hank Williams and His Drifting Cowboys | Hey, Good Lookin' | 1951
254 | Mahalia Jackson | He's Got the Whole World In His Hands | 1958
254 | Nat King Cole | Stardust | 1957
258 | Buddy Holly & The Crickets | Maybe Baby | 1957
259 | John Cage | Indeterminacy (Part One) | 1959
260 | The Del-Vikings | Come Go With Me | 1956
261 | Jerry Butler & The Impressions | For Your Precious Love | 1958
262 | "My Fair Lady" | I Could Have Danced All Night | 1956
262 | Chet Baker | Time After Time | 1954
262 | Ella Fitzgerald | Caravan | 1957
265 | Richard Strauss | Four Last Songs: At Sunset | 1950
265 | Ornette Coleman | Lonely Woman | 1959
267 | Duane Eddy | Rebel Rouser | 1958
268 | Doris Day | Whatever Will Be, Will Be (Que Sera, Sera) | 1956
269 | Charles Mingus | Goodbye Pork Pie Hat | 1959
270 | Ewan MacColl | Dirty Old Town | 1950
271 | Dion & the Belmonts | I Wonder Why | 1958
271 | Elvis Presley | First in Line | 1956
271 | Lucho Gatica | El Reloj | 1959
274 | Hank Williams and His Drifting Cowboys | Take These Chains from My Heart | 1953
275 | The Coasters | Poison Ivy | 1959
276 | Bobby Darin | Dream Lover | 1959
276 | Howlin' Wolf | Moanin' at Midnight | 1951
278 | Fats Domino | I'm In Love Again | 1956
279 | Muddy Waters | Got My Mojo Working | 1957
280 | Ella Fitzgerald | I Got Rhythm | 1959
280 | Frank Sinatra | Three Coins in the Fountain | 1954
280 | Georges Brassens | Chanson pour l'Auvergnat | 1954
280 | Louis Armstrong | Mack the Knife | 1955
280 | Miriam Makeba & The Skylarks | Inkomo Zodwa | 1959
285 | Little Junior's Blue Flames (Junior Parker) | Mystery Train | 1953
286 | Bo Diddley | I'm A Man | 1955
287 | Percy Faith & His Orchestra | The Theme from a Summer Place | 1959
287 | Donald O’Connor | Make 'Em Laugh | 1952
287 | John Coltrane | Giant Steps | 1959
287 | Johnny Kidd & The Pirates | Please Don't Touch | 1959
291 | The Spaniels | Goodnite Sweetheart, Goodnite | 1954
292 | Dale Hawkins | Susie-Q | 1957
293 | Chet Baker | I Fall in Love Too Easily | 1954
294 | The 5 Royales | Dedicated to the One I Love | 1957
295 | Little Richard | Jenny Jenny | 1957
296 | Buddy Holly & The Crickets | It Doesn't Matter Anymore | 1959
297 | Akira Ifukube | Suite (From "Godzilla") | 1954
297 | Georges Brassens | Colombine | 1956
297 | Sarah Vaughan | Lover Man | 1954
300 | Boris Vian | J'suis snob | 1955
301 | Abbey Lincoln | My Man | 1957
301 | Ray Charles | Lonely Avenue | 1956
303 | Johnny Ace | Pledging My Love | 1954
304 | Johnny Otis | Willie and the Hand Jive | 1958
305 | Hank Williams and His Drifting Cowboys | Moanin' the Blues | 1950
306 | Bill Doggett | Honky Tonk | 1956
307 | The Kingston Trio | Tom Dooley | 1958
308 | Eddie Cochran | C'mon Everybody | 1958
309 | Boris Vian | Je bois | 1956
310 | Dinah Washington | What a Diff'rence a Day Makes | 1959
311 | Elizabeth Cotten | Freight Train | 1958
312 | Art Blakey & His Jazz Messengers | Moanin' | 1958
313 | Dmitri Shostakovich | Cello Concerto No. 1, IV | 1959
313 | Jerry Lee Lewis | It'll Be Me | 1957
313 | Moondog | Up Broadway | 1957
316 | Little Richard | Keep a Knockin’ | 1957
317 | Cliff Richard | Move It | 1958
318 | Santo and Johnny | Sleep Walk | 1959
319 | Johnnie Ray | Cry | 1951
320 | Frank Sinatra | All the Way | 1957
320 | Little Willie John | My Nerves | 1956
322 | Chuck Berry | Carol | 1958
323 | The Chantels | Maybe | 1957
324 | Jimmy Forrest | Night Train | 1956
324 | Sarah Vaughan | September Song | 1955
324 | Thelonious Monk | Bemsha Swing | 1957
324 | Patti Page | The Tennessee Waltz | 1950
328 | LaVern Baker | Jim Dandy | 1956
329 | Betty Hutton | It's Oh So Quiet 1950 | 1951
330 | Édith Piaf | Padam… Padam | 1951
331 | Ella Fitzgerald | Don't Get Around Much Anymore | 1957
331 | Elvis Presley | Baby Let's Play House | 1955
331 | Johnny Mathis | Come To Me | 1958
331 | Rosemary Clooney | Mambo Italiano | 1954
331 | The Monotones | Book of Love | 1957
331 | Thelonious Monk | New York Sketchbook | 1957
331 | Yma Sumac | Cha Cha Gitano | 1954
338 | Teresa Brewer | Music! Music! Music! | 1950
339 | Otis Rush | All Your Love | 1959
339 | Billie Holiday | Sophisticated Lady | 1958
341 | The Weavers | The Hammer Song | 1950
342 | Count Basie | Lil' Darlin' | 1957
342 | Oskar Sala | Concertando Rubato From Elektronische Tanzsuite | 1955
344 | Mickey and Sylvia | Love Is Strange | 1956
345 | Bobby Bland | Farther Up the Road | 1957
345 | Charlie Parker | Bloomdido | 1950
345 | Sarah Vaughan | Broken Hearted Melody | 1959
345 | Sonny Rollins | The Freedom Suite | 1958
349 | Thelonius Monk | Blue Monk | 1954
350 | Nat King Cole | When I Fall in Love | 1957
351 | The Clovers | Love Potion No. 9 | 1959
352 | Antônio Carlos Jobim | Desafinado | 1958
352 | Memphis Slim | Mother Earth | 1951
352 | Sarah Vaughan | Shulie a Bop | 1954
355 | Little Walter | My Babe | 1955
356 | Serge Gainsbourg | Le poinçonneur des Lilas | 1958
357 | Chuck Berry | Merry Christmas Baby | 1958
357 | Freddy Quinn | Unter fremden Sternen | 1959
359 | Ella Fitzgerald | Let's Do It (Let's Fall in Love) | 1956
360 | Dean Martin | That's Amore | 1953
361 | Karlheinz Stockhausen | Gruppen | 1957
362 | Ella Fitzgerald | Anything Goes | 1956
362 | Ella Fitzgerald | Someone To Watch Over Me | 1950
362 | Harry Belafonte | Dolly Dawn | 1956
362 | Robert Pete Williams | Levee Camp Blues | 1950s
366 | B. B. King | 3 O'Clock Blues | 1951
367 | Cliff Richard | Living Doll | 1959
367 | Hank Williams and His Drifting Cowboys | Ramblin' Man | 1953
367 | Moondog | Suite No. 2 | 1953
367 | Rosemary Clooney | This Ole House | 1954
371 | Hank Ballard and The Midnighters | Work With Me Annie | 1954
371 | Miriam Makeba & the Skylarks | Uile Ngoan'a Batho | 1959
373 | Trio Los Panchos | Lo dudo | 1954
374 | Agostinho dos Santos & Roberto Menescal | A felicidade | 1959
375 | The Crests | 16 Candles | 1958
376 | John Lee Hooker | I'm In the Mood | 1951
377 | Dave Brubeck Quartet | Strange Meadow Lark | 1959
377 | Dmitri Shostakovich | Gadly, Op. 97a: Romance | 1955
377 | The Staple Singers | Low Is The Way | 1957
380 | The Modern Jazz Quartet | Fontessa | 1956
381 | Chet Baker | But Not for Me | 1954
381 | Ornette Coleman | Endless | 1959
383 | Howlin' Wolf | Evil | 1954
384 | Artie Barsamian & His Orchestra | Misirlou | 1959
384 | Chuck Berry | You Can't Catch Me | 1956
384 | Lord Ivanhoe | Lift the Iron Curtain | 1959
384 | Ornette Coleman | Compassion | 1959
388 | Patti Page | Mockin' Bird Hill | 1951
388 | Georges Brassens | Ballade des dames du temps jadis | 1954
388 | Howlin' Wolf | The Natchez Burning | 1956
388 | John Coltrane | Blue Train | 1958
388 | Miles Davis | Deception | 1959
388 | Swan Silvertones | Mary Don't You Weep | 1959
394 | Nina Simone | Little Girl Blue | 1957
395 | Édith Piaf | Non, je ne regrette rien | 1959
395 | Little Willie John | No Regrets | 1958
397 | Miles Davis | Blue in Green | 1959
398 | B.B. King | Ten Long Years | 1955
398 | Charles Mingus | Fables of Faubus | 1959
398 | Dave Brubeck Quartet | Jump For Joy (Live) | 1959
398 | Stan Kenton | La suerte de los tontos | 1956
402 | Sonny Terry & Brownie McGhee | Better Day | 1958
403 | Dave Brubeck Quartet | Ain't Misbehavin' | 1959
403 | Henry Mancini | Peter Gunn | 1958
405 | The Soul Stirrers | Touch the Hem of His Garment | 1956
406 | Buddy Holly & The Crickets | Words of Love | 1958
406 | Ella Fitzgerald & Louis Armstrong | Love Is Here To Stay | 1957
406 | Georges Brassens | Le Nombril des femmes d'agent | 1956
406 | Jacob do Bandolim | Benzinho | 1955
406 | Jo Stafford | You Belong to Me | 1952
411 | Fats Domino | I'm Walkin' | 1954
412 | Boris Vian | La Complainte du progrès | 1956
412 | Louis Armstrong & Oscar Peterson | Jus One of Those Things | 1957
412 | Miles Davis | Two Bass Hit | 1958
412 | Thelonious Monk | Off Minor | 1957
416 | Pierre Henry | Vocalises, 1952 | 1952
416 | Bill Evans | Israel | 1958
416 | Huey "Piano" Smith and The Clowns | Don't You Just Know It | 1958
416 | Jacques Brel | Je ne sais pas | 1958
420 | Elvis Presley | Don't | 1958
420 | LaVern Baker | I Cried a Tear | 1958
420 | Ljubica Maric | Byzantine Concerto: I. Sound and Ringing | 1959
420 | The Andrews Sisters | Sleigh Ride | 1950
420 | The Diamonds | The Stroll | 1957
425 | Lightnin' Hopkins | Shotgun Blues | 1950
426 | The Platters | My Prayer | 1956
427 | Amália Rodrigues | Barco Negro | 1955
427 | Elvis Presley | Just Because | 1956
427 | Frankie Avalon | Venus | 1959
427 | Sonny Rollins | St. Thomas | 1956
427 | Thelonious Monk | Sweet & Lovely | 1957
432 | Charles Aznavour | Une Enfant | 1955
433 | Dean Martin | Sway | 1954
434 | Art Farmer Septet | Mau Mau | 1954
434 | Count Basie | April in Paris | 1955
434 | Dmitri Shostakovich | Prelude and Fugue No. 1 in C Major | 1951
434 | Ella Fitzgerald | The Christmas Song | 1957
434 | Georges Brassens | La Légende de la nonne | 1953
434 | Juliette Gréco | Sous le ciel de Paris | 1951
434 | Brenda Lee | Sweet Nothin's | 1959
441 | Little Richard | Slippin' and Slidin' (Peepin' and Hidin') | 1956
442 | Billie Holiday | You’ve Changed | 1958
443 | Ray Anthony | Dragnet / Room 43 | 1953
443 | Georges Brassens | La Première Fille | 1954
443 | Jerry Lee Lewis | Breathless | 1958
443 | Little Richard | Ready Teddy | 1956
443 | Stan Getz | Detour Ahead | 1957
448 | Magali Noël | Fais-moi mal, Johnny ! | 1956
449 | Elvis Presley | (Let Me Be Your) Teddy Bear | 1957
449 | Georges Brassens | Marinette | 1957
449 | Harry Belafonte | Island in the Sun | 1957
449 | Jeri Simpson | In My Black Lace | 1957
449 | Sanford Clark | The Fool | 1956
454 | Little Walter | Juke | 1952
455 | Champion Jack Dupree | Stack-O-Lee | 1958
455 | John Coltrane | Every Time We Say Goodbye | 1957
455 | Nat King Cole | A Blossom Fell | 1955
458 | Lloyd Price | Personality | 1959
459 | Blind Blake & The Royal Victoria Hotel Calypsos | Love Love Alone | 1950
459 | Chuck Berry | Brown Eyed Handsome Man | 1956
459 | Ella Fitzgerald | The Sun Forgot To Shine This Morning | 1956
459 | Georges Brassens | Les sabots d'Hélène | 1954
459 | Sonny Boy Williamson (II) | Mighty Long Time | 1951
464 | Reri Grist | Somewhere | 1957
464 | Reverend Gary Davis | Pure Religion | 1957
464 | Clyde McPhatter | Treasure of Love | 1956
464 | The Bobbettes | Mr. Lee | 1957
464 | The Poets | Dead | 1958
464 | Thelonious Monk | Well You Needn't | 1952
470 | João Gilberto, Antônio Carlos Jobim & Luiz Bonfá | Manhã de Carnaval | 1959
470 | Kippie Moeketsi & the Marabi Kings | Goli Kwela | 1958
470 | Meade "Lux" Lewis | Honky Tonk Train Blues | 1955
470 | Yma Sumac | Wayra (Dance of the Winds) | 1950
474 | Amália Rodrigues | Uma casa Portuguesa | 1953
474 | Clifford Brown and Max Roach | I Get a Kick Out of You | 1955
474 | James "Sugar Boy" Crawford | Jock-A-Mo | 1954
474 | Nat King Cole | Stompin' Down Broadway | 1955
478 | Huey "Piano" Smith and The Clowns | Rocking Pneumonia & the Boogie Woogie Flu | 1957
479 | Babatunde Olatunji | Shango (Chant to the God of Thunder) | 1959
479 | Billie Holiday | I Get Along Without You Very Well | 1958
479 | Maliot Radio Orchestar Skopje Macedonia | Macedonski Narodni Ora | 1951
479 | Sam Cooke | I'll Come Running Back to You | 1957
479 | Stan Getz & Lionel Hampton | Gladys | 1955
479 | The Poni-Tails | Born Too Late | 1958
479 | William Warfield | Ol' Man River | 1951
486 | Chuck Berry | Back in the U.S.A. | 1959
487 | Ilunga Patrice & Misonba Victor | Mama Josefina | 1958
487 | Lennie Tristano | Descent Into the Maelstrom | 1953
487 | Stan Getz & Lionel Hampton | Cherokee | 1955
490 | Eartha Kitt | Santa Baby | 1953
490 | Frank Sinatra | Love and Marriage | 1955
490 | Moondog | Pastoral Suite | 1953
490 | The Viscounts | Harlem Nocturne | 1959
494 | Bud Powell | Un poco loco | 1951
494 | Elvis Presley | A Big Hunk O' Love | 1959
494 | Odetta | Santy Anno | 1956
494 | The Schoolboys | Please Say You Want Me | 1957
498 | Brownie McGhee | Cholly Blues | 1951
498 | Charlie Parker | April in Paris | 1950
498 | Ella Fitzgerald | From This Moment On | 1956
498 | Ivan | Real Wild Child | 1958
498 | Miles Davis | Will You Still Be Mine | 1954
498 | Sarah Vaughan | Whatever Lola Wants | 1955
504 | Guy Warren Sounds | The Talking Drum Looks Ahead | 1958
504 | Miles Davis | Godchild | 1954
504 | Clyde McPhatter | Without Love (There Is Nothing) | 1956
507 | Professor Longhair and His Blues Scholars | "G" Jam | 1953
507 | Cannonball Adderley | Autumn Leaves | 1958
507 | Jimmy Smith | The Sermon | 1958
507 | Marilyn Monroe | I Wanna Be Loved by You | 1959
507 | The Drifters | White Christmas | 1954
512 | Muddy Waters | I'm Ready | 1954
513 | Buddy Holly & The Crickets | Tell Me How | 1957
513 | Carl Perkins | Honey Don't | 1956
513 | Elizete Cardoso & Luiz Bonfa | Chega de saudade | 1958
513 | Lefty Frizzell | The Long Black Veil | 1959
513 | Stan Getz | Here's That Rainy Day | 1952
513 | The Coasters | Down in Mexico | 1956
513 | Fats Domino | Blue Monday | 1956
520 | Big Bill Broonzy | Hey, Hey | 1951
520 | Chuck Berry | Drifting Heart | 1956
520 | Dalida | Buenas noches mi amor | 1957
520 | Elvis Presley | Crawfish | 1958
520 | Les Paul & Mary Ford | Dialog & In The Mood | 1951
520 | Oscar Peterson | It’s Allright With Me | 1959
520 | SILVANA MANGANO | Anna (El Negro Zumbón) | 1953
520 | The Moonglows | Sincerely | 1954
528 | Charlie Parker | Relaxin' With Lee (Complete Take) | 1950
528 | Ella Fitzgerald | Blue Skies | 1959
528 | Georges Brassens | Bonhomme | 1958
528 | Gerry Mulligan Quartet | Frenesi | 1953
528 | João Gilberto, Antônio Carlos Jobim & Luiz Bonfá | A Felicidade | 1959
528 | John Fahey | In Christ There Is No East Or West | 1959
528 | John Lee Hooker | Dimples | 1956
528 | Bill Justis | Raunchy | 1957
536 | Ahmed Abdul-Malik | La Ibky (Don't Cry) | 1959
536 | Big Joe Turner | Flip, Flop & Fly | 1955
536 | Georges Brassens | Hécatombe | 1952
536 | Stan Getz | Little Girl Blue | 1950
540 | Boris Vian | On n'est pas là pour se faire engueuler | 1956
540 | Ernestine Washington & The Celestial Choir | I'm His Child | 1959
540 | Leonard Bernstein | America | 1957
540 | Louis Armstrong | St. Louis Blues (1954 version) | 1954
540 | Buddy Holly & The Crickets | Dearest | 1959
545 | Celia Cruz | Burundanga | 1956
545 | Clark Terry | Swahili | 1955
545 | Clyde McPhatter | A Lover's Question | 1958
545 | Frankie Ford | Sea Cruise | 1958
545 | Hank Williams and His Drifting Cowboys | Kaw-Liga | 1953
545 | Jimmie Rodgers | Kisses Sweeter Than Wine | 1957
551 | Léo Arnaud | Bugler's Dream | 1958
552 | Bo Diddley | She's Fine She's Mine | 1955
552 | Jim Reeves | Bimbo | 1953
552 | The Coasters | Young Blood | 1957
552 | Witold Lutoslawski | Concerto for Orchestra: Intrada | 1954
552 | The Coasters | That Is Rock'n'roll | 1959
557 | Remo Giazotto | Adagio in G minor | 1958
557 | Fred McDowell | Fred McDowell's Blues | 1959
557 | ORIGINAL BROADWAY CAST (MICKEY CALIN & ENSEMBLE) | Cool | 1957
557 | The Cadillacs | Speedoo | 1955
561 | Hank Williams and His Drifting Cowboys | My Son Calls Another Man Daddy | 1950
561 | Oscar Peterson | In the Still of the Night | 1959
561 | Screamin' Jay Hawkins | Ol' Man River | 1958
564 | Charlie Parker | Just Friends | 1950
564 | Eddy Arnold | The Cattle Call | 1955
564 | Ella Fitzgerald | You're the Top | 1956
564 | Elvis Presley | Good Rockin' Tonight | 1954
564 | Johnny Mathis | Chances Are | 1957
564 | Link Wray | Slinky! | 1959
570 | Ella Fitzgerald | Miss Otis Regrets | 1956
570 | Smiley Lewis | I Hear You Knocking | 1955
570 | The Robins | Riot in Cell Block #9 | 1954
570 | The Falcons | You're So Fine | 1959
574 | Barbie Gaye | My Boy Lollipop | 1956
574 | Georges Brassens | Le vin | 1957
574 | Sonny Boy Williamson | Don't Start Me Talkin' | 1955
577 | Ella Fitzgerald | Like Someone In Love | 1957
577 | Hank Ballard | The Twist | 1959
577 | John D. Loudermilk | Lament of the Cherokee Nation | 1959
577 | Machito | Rhumba Abierta | 1951
577 | The Staple Singers | Uncloudy Day | 1956
577 | Guy Mitchell | Singing The Blues | 1956
583 | Anita O'Day | Let's Face the Music and Dance | 1957
583 | B.B. King | Every Day I Have the Blues | 1954
583 | Les Baxter | Unchained Melody | 1955
586 | Chuck Berry | Little Queenie | 1959
586 | Howlin' Wolf | How Many More Years | 1951
586 | Les Baxter | Quiet Village | 1951
586 | Louis Armstrong & Gabriele | Onkel Satchmo's Lullaby | 1959
586 | Lloyd Price | Just Because | 1957
591 | Johnny Cash | Cry Cry Cry | 1955
591 | Oscar Peterson | Love For Sale | 1959
591 | The Elegants | Little Star | 1958
591 | The Stanley Brothers | Angel Band | 1955
595 | Billie Holiday | Say It Isn't So | 1955
595 | Gene Vincent & His Blue Caps | Blue Jean Bop | 1956
595 | Lotte Lenya | Bilbao Song | 1955
598 | Otto Luening | Fantasy in Space | 1955
598 | Percy Mayfield | Please send me someone to love | 1950
598 | Georges Brassens | Le parapluie | 1952
598 | Lightnin' Hopkins | Jake Head Boogie | 1952
598 | Maria Callas | Vincenzo Bellini's Casta Diva from Norma | 1954
598 | The Quarrymen | In Spite of All the Danger | 1958
604 | Bascom Lamar Lunsford | Mole in the Ground | 1953
604 | Clarence "Frogman" Henry | Ain't Got No Home | 1956
604 | Nat King Cole | Aquellos Ojos Verdes | 1958
604 | The Dells | Oh, What a Nite | 1956
608 | Agostinho dos Santos | Manhã de Carnaval | 1959
608 | Rev. Gary Davis | Say No To The Devil | 1953
608 | Frankie Lymon & the Teenagers | The ABCs of Love | 1956
608 | Wanda Jackson | Tongue Tied | 1959
612 | Howlin' Wolf | No Place to Go | 1954
613 | Georges Brassens | Brave Margot | 1953
613 | Hibari Misora | Ringo Oiwake | 1952
613 | Sun Ra | The Golden Lady | 1959
613 | The Soul Stirrers | By and By | 1950
617 | Asha Bhosle` | Aaja Aaja | 1956
617 | Sam Butera | The Boulevard Of Broken Dreams, Fever | 1959
617 | The Weavers | Goodnight, Irene | 1950
620 | Chris Barber's Jazz Band & Sister Rosetta | Peace In The Valley | 1957
620 | Fairuz | Itab | 1952
620 | Galina Ustvolskaya | Octet | 1950
620 | Jacques Brel | Les flamandes | 1959
620 | The Ames Brothers | Rag Mop | 1950
620 | Tito Puente | El Cayuco | 1958
620 | Earl Bostic | Flamingo | 1951
627 | Benny Moré | Cómo Fue | 1953
627 | Elvis Presley | Wear My Ring Around Your Neck | 1958
627 | Krzysztof Penderecki | Anaklasis | 1959
627 | Marvin Phillips | Salty Dog | 1953
627 | Wanda Jackson | Lonely Weekends | 1959
632 | Ray Charles | Leave My Woman Alone | 1956
632 | Bing Crosby & Grace Kelly | True Love | 1956
632 | José Alfredo Jiménez | Ella | 1956
632 | Neil Sedaka | Oh Carol | 1959
632 | Willis Jackson | Gator's Groove | 1952
637 | Roy Orbison | Ooby Dooby | 1956
637 | Sonny Boy Williamson (II) | Eyesight to the Blind | 1951
637 | The Louvin Brothers | I Don't Believe You've Met My Baby | 1956
637 | Johnny Cash | I Still Miss Someone | 1958
641 | Pixinguinha | Que Perigo | 1955
641 | Chet Baker | The Thrill is Gone | 1954
641 | Connie Francis | Stupid Cupid | 1958
641 | Cozy Cole | Topsy Part 2 | 1958
641 | Elliott Carter | String Quartet No. 2: I. Allegro fantastico | 1959
641 | Hank Williams and His Drifting Cowboys | Cold, Cold Heart | 1951
641 | Libertad Lamarque | Historia de un Amor | 1956
648 | Art & Dotty Todd | Chanson d'amour | 1958
648 | Ella Fitzgerald | Midnight Sun | 1957
648 | Odetta | Gallows Tree (Gallows Pole) | 1957
648 | West African Rhythm Stars | Late Ojo Davies | 1955
652 | Professor Longhair and His Blues Scholars | Tipitina | 1953
652 | Ella Fitzgerald & Louis Armstrong | Cheek To Cheek | 1956
652 | The Browns | The Three Bells | 1959

User avatar
bonnielaurel
Unquestionable Presence
Posts: 594
Joined: Wed Feb 20, 2013 2:48 pm

Re: AMF 1950s Song Poll Results

Postby bonnielaurel » Wed Dec 07, 2016 7:07 am

Great to see Jacques Brel and Nina Simone in the top 10. A lot of milestones are in this list. Terrific work again, JamieW an DaveC!

User avatar
Romain
Die Mensch Maschine
Posts: 3062
Joined: Fri Feb 10, 2012 2:25 pm
Location: Lyon, France

Re: AMF 1950s Song Poll Results

Postby Romain » Wed Dec 07, 2016 4:03 pm

JamieW and DaveC...looks like a name of a band.


And...ladies and gentlmen... the terrific JamieW and DaveC.....whouhooiuuuuu...Clapclapclapclap !


Good job guys.

jamieW
Die Mensch Maschine
Posts: 1072
Joined: Sat Oct 27, 2012 9:19 pm

Re: AMF 1950s Song Poll Results

Postby jamieW » Wed Dec 07, 2016 10:33 pm

Romain wrote:JamieW and DaveC...looks like a name of a band.


And...ladies and gentlmen... the terrific JamieW and DaveC.....whouhooiuuuuu...Clapclapclapclap !


Good job guys.


Thanks, Romain, bonnielaurel and everyone!

And I can't speak for Dave, but as soon as I started singing, the applause would abruptly stop. :P

DaveC
Die Mensch Maschine
Posts: 1147
Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2013 12:04 am

Re: AMF 1950s Song Poll Results

Postby DaveC » Wed Dec 07, 2016 10:47 pm

jamieW wrote:
Romain wrote:JamieW and DaveC...looks like a name of a band.


And...ladies and gentlmen... the terrific JamieW and DaveC.....whouhooiuuuuu...Clapclapclapclap !


Good job guys.


Thanks, Romain, bonnielaurel and everyone!

And I can't speak for Dave, but as soon as I started singing, the applause would abruptly stop. :P


I wouldn't inflict my singing on anyone.

Thanks for the thanks everyone.

User avatar
Honorio
Die Mensch Maschine
Posts: 1407
Joined: Sat Feb 11, 2012 7:38 am
Location: L'Eliana, Valencia, Spain

Re: AMF 1950s Song Poll Results

Postby Honorio » Sat Feb 18, 2017 1:32 pm



Sorry, jamieW and DaveC, I forgot to post the playlist!. An excellent starting point for anyone willing to know the higher points in 1950s music.


Return to “Music, music, music...”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot] and 71 guests