Most Acclaimed Covers/Remakes

Post Reply
User avatar
Bruce
Die Mensch Maschine
Posts: 1232
Joined: Tue Jul 23, 2013 5:36 am
Location: New Jersey

Most Acclaimed Covers/Remakes

Post by Bruce » Sat Aug 02, 2014 7:06 am

Here's the most acclaimed songs of all time that were done originally by another act than this.

1 - I Heard It Through The Grapevine - Marvin Gaye
2 - Respect - Aretha Franklin
3 - Louie Louie - Kingsmen
4 - Suspicious Minds - Elvis
5 - Mr. Tambourine Man - Byrds
6 - All Along The Watchtower - Jimi Hendrix
7 - Hound Dog - Elvis
8 - Rock Around The Clock - Bill Haley & Comets
9 - Whole Lot of Shaking Goin' On - Jerry Lee Lewis
10 - Nothing Compares 2 U - Sinéad O'Connor

User avatar
Mattceinicram
Different Class
Posts: 496
Joined: Tue Jan 08, 2013 8:26 am
Location: Indiana when home. Minneapolis, Minnesota during college

Re: Most Acclaimed Covers/Remakes

Post by Mattceinicram » Sat Aug 02, 2014 10:18 pm

Some of the originals of these songs are also great and a bit under appreciated.
Check out my music review blog! Matt and Music! mattandmusic.blogspot.com

User avatar
Honorio
Die Mensch Maschine
Posts: 2489
Joined: Sat Feb 11, 2012 7:38 am
Location: L'Eliana, Valencia, Spain

Re: Most Acclaimed Covers/Remakes

Post by Honorio » Sun Aug 10, 2014 11:43 am

Bruce, I used the information you provided to post it my way, expanding the list including also information about samples.

Image


As Bruce pointed, these are the covers included on Acclaimed Music Top 100 (so this means that these are the most acclaimed covers ever):
1 - I Heard It Through the Grapevine - Marvin Gaye
2 - Respect - Aretha Franklin
3 - Louie Louie - The Kingsmen
4 - Suspicious Minds - Elvis Presley
5 - Mr. Tambourine Man - The Byrds
6 - All Along the Watchtower - The Jimi Hendrix Experience
7 - Hound Dog - Elvis Presley
8 - (We're Gonna) Rock Around the Clock - Bill Haley & His Comets
9 - Whole Lot of Shaking Goin' On - Jerry Lee Lewis
10 - Nothing Compares 2 U - Sinéad O'Connor
11 - The House of the Rising Sun - The Animals

Some previously released versions were also ranked on Acclaimed Music Top 6000:
- I Heard It Through the Grapevine - Gladys Knight and The Pips (#5937)
- Respect - Otis Redding (#4662)
- Louie Louie - Richard Berry (#4137)
- Mr. Tambourine Man - Bob Dylan (#837)
- All Along the Watchtower - Bob Dylan (#1039)
- Hound Dog - Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton (#621)

I also included two bonus features:
a) Songs with shared songwriting credits because of samples (or even plagiarism).
b) Songs that included samples (or borrowed music or lyrics) not credited on songwriting credits.

So, enjoy the list!
Note: The numbers indicate the position of these songs on the Top 6000 songs list of Acclaimed Music.


06. I Heard It Through the Grapevine (1968)

[imgsize 175x175]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/ca517a4cb32ed287a1a8f52c163df24e/2393078.jpg[/imgsize]
Written by Norman Whitfield and Barrett Strong and first recorded by Smokey Robinson and the Miracles on August 6th of 1966 at Hitsville USA Studio A, Detroit, Michigan produced by Norman Whitfield but rejected for release as a single by Berry Gordy, it was first released on August 26th of 1968 on Tamla label as the seventh song (opening the B-side) of the album "Special Occasion" (youtube link). The second version (recorded by Marvin Gaye) was also rejected and the third version, recorded by Gladys Knight & the Pips on June 17th of 1967 at Hitsville USA Studio A, Detroit produced by Norman Whitfield was the first released version, released on September 28th of 1967 on Motown's Soul label as the A-side of a single (youtube link).

[imgsize 175x175]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/04afa0bdda18c6284435f1ba7114f142/2604041.jpg[/imgsize]
Recorded by Marvin Gaye on February 3rd, 8th, 13th, 15th and April 10th of 1967 at Hitsville USA Studio A, Detroit, Michigan produced by Norman Whitfield and released on August 26th of 1968 on Tamla label as the fourth song of the album "In the Groove" (youtube link).

Additional info: wikipedia, secondhandsongs


07. Respect (1967)

[imgsize 175x175]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/6f11c454d9d53c0afd80915ba71f8c99/1819534.jpg[/imgsize]
Written and recorded by Otis Redding, recorded in July of 1965 at Stax Recording Studios, Memphis, Tennessee produced by Steve Cropper and released on August 15th of 1965 on Volt label as the A-side of a single (youtube link).

[imgsize 175x175]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/058205cddd3a02f4c2977306b91f9590/5302959.png[/imgsize]
Recorded by Aretha Franklin on February 14th of 1967 at Atlantic Records Studio, New York City produced by Jerry Wexler and released on March 10th of 1967 on Atlantic label as the opener of the album "I Never Loved a Man the Way I Love You" (youtube link).

Additional info: wikipedia, secondhandsongs


26. Louie Louie (1963)

[imgsize 175x175]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/ccfbe160bea3c1b2424df224dfc48a08/1820602.jpg[/imgsize]
Written by Richard Berry, recorded by Richard Berry and the Pharaohs in 1957 and released in April of 1957 on Flip label as the B-side of the single "You Are My Sunshine" (youtube link). But probably the direct influence on The Kingsmen cover was the version recorded by Rockin' Robin Roberts in 1960 and released in March of 1961 on Etiquette label as the A-side of a single (youtube link).

[imgsize 175x175]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/da8006910059811450aa6927bb2c9440/3953982.jpg[/imgsize]
Recorded by The Kingsmen on April 6th 1963 at Northwestern Inc. Motion Pictures and Recording, Portland, Oregon produced by Ken Chase and Jerry Dennon and released in May of 1963 on Jerden label as the A-side of a single (youtube link).

Additional info: wikipedia, secondhandsongs


54. Suspicious Minds (1969)

[imgsize 175x175]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/5836ada01829f9202a7d29845a057f54/2509937.jpg[/imgsize]
Written and recorded by Mark James in 1968 and released in 1968 on Scepter label as the A-side of a single (youtube link).

[imgsize 175x175]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/c69607389554480056945e53e66a4740/1279813.jpg[/imgsize]
Recorded by Elvis Presley on January 22nd of 1969 at American Sound Studio, Memphis, Tennessee produced by Chips Moman and Felton Jarvis and released on August 26th of 1969 on RCA Victor label as the A-side of a single (youtube link).

Additional info: wikipedia, secondhandsongs


57. Mr. Tambourine Man (1965)

[imgsize 175x175]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/aeb588105a7697a2168d7d2d6840778a/3718810.jpg[/imgsize]
Written by Bob Dylan in February of 1964, recorded by Bob Dylan on January 15th of 1965 at Columbia Recording Studios, New York City produced by Tom Wilson and released March 22nd of 1965 on Columbia label as the eighth song (opening the B-side) of the album "Bringing It All Back Home" (vimeo link). The Brothers Four recorded a version of the song during 1964 before Dylan first released version (based on a demo recorded by Bob Dylan in June of 1964) but it was released in May of 1965 (after both the Dylan and Byrds versions) as the last song of the album "The Honey Wind Blows" (youtube link).

[imgsize 175x175]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/8bae50f1129586a157fc6cc96ee208aa/1730668.jpg[/imgsize]
Recorded by The Byrds on January 20th of 1965 at Columbia Studios, Hollywood, California produced by Terry Melcher and released on April 12th of 1965 on Columbia label as the A-side of a single (youtube link).

Additional info: wikipedia, secondhandsongs


70. All Along the Watchtower (1968)

[imgsize 175x175]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/25525b52f278703b3b043822ed170b57/1966527.jpg[/imgsize]
Written and recorded by Bob Dylan, recorded on November 5th of 1967 at Columbia Studio A in Nashville, Tennessee produced by Bob Johnston and released on December 27th of 1967 on Columbia label as the fourth song of the album "John Wesley Harding" (youtube link).

[imgsize 175x175]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/cc68e4d7baa0c470c2b4cdea95858ea5/2247448.jpg[/imgsize]
Recorded by The Jimi Hendrix Experience in January of 1968 at Olympic Studios, London, England and from June to August of 1968 at Record Plant Studios, New York City produced by Jimi Hendrix and released on September 21st of 1968 on Reprise label in the USA as the A-side of a single (youtube link).

Additional info: wikipedia, secondhandsongs


71. Hound Dog (1956)

[imgsize 175x175]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/ee6ec3d60696faf46fe2ba03aedae8fc/1750847.jpg[/imgsize]
Written by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller, recorded by Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton with Kansas City Bill & Orchestra on August 13th of 1952 at Radio Recorders Annex, Los Angeles, California produced by Johnny Otis and released in February of 1953 on Peacock label as the A-side of a single (youtube link). But according to Wikipedia the direct inspiration for Elvis version was the recording by Freddie Bell and the Bellboys released in 1955 (youtube link).

[imgsize 175x175]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/6d5fa0295f2011f9dd6cfd3bdcff7d08/1279808.jpg[/imgsize]
Recorded by Elvis Presley on July 2nd of 1956 at RCA studio, New York City produced by Steve Sholes and released on July 13th of 1956 on RCA Victor label as the B-side of the single "Don't Be Cruel " (youtube link).

Additional info: wikipedia, secondhandsongs


74. (We're Gonna) Rock Around the Clock (1954)

[imgsize 175x175]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/b3d1ea7e21eadde544e8cd224e841075/5134316.jpg[/imgsize]
Written by Max C. Freedman and Jimmy De Knight (pseudonym of James E. Myers), recorded by Sonny Dae and His Knights on March 20th of 1954 and released in 1954 on Arcade label as the A-side of a single (youtube link).

[imgsize 175x175]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/682e4cae9d9f3fee5c4bcd1ed2108b4e/2238209.jpg[/imgsize]
Recorded by Bill Haley and His Comets on April 12th of 1954 at Pythian Temple Studios, New York City produced by Milt Gabler and released on May 10th of 1954 on Decca label as the A-side of a single (youtube link).

Additional info: wikipedia, secondhandsongs.
According to Wikipedia: "Although first recorded by Italian-American band Sonny Dae and His Knights on March 20, 1954, the more famous version by Bill Haley & His Comets is not, strictly speaking, a cover version. Myers claimed the song had been written specifically for Haley but, for various reasons, Haley was unable to record it himself until April 12, 1954."


80. Whole Lot of Shakin' Going On (1957)

[imgsize 175x175]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/a69ece3db6640127ef4aed9676f20bfc/2265841.jpg[/imgsize]
Written by Dave "Curlee" Williams and James Faye "Roy" Hall, recorded by Big Maybelle on March 21st of 1955 produced by Quincy Jones and released as "Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin' On" in 1955 on Okeh label as the A-side of a single (youtube link).

[imgsize 175x175]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/f2643b6f63aec455a00c077fc3537158/5026414.png[/imgsize]
Recorded by Jerry Lee Lewis in February of 1957 at Sun Studios, Memphis, Tennessee produced by Jack Clement and released as "Whole Lot of Shakin' Going On" on May 27th of 1957 on Sun label as the A-side of a single (youtube link).

Additional info: wikipedia, secondhandsongs


81. Nothing Compares 2 U (1990)

[imgsize 175x175]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/b1c0d5c2da6a609a647a37faada1f1e0/1225917.jpg[/imgsize]
Written by Prince, recorded by The Family in July of 1985 at Paisley Park Studios, Chanhassen, Minnesota produced by Prince and David Z and released on August 19th of 1985 on Paisley Park label as the sixth song (second of the B-side) of the album "The Family" (youtube link).

[imgsize 175x175]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/2f55c54e1f2fbbc1778e22aea995d52b/1228606.jpg[/imgsize]
Recorded by Sinéad O'Connor in 1989 at Britannia Row and Westside Studios, London, England produced by Sinéad O'Connor and Nellee Hooper and released on January 8th of 1990 on Chrysalis label as the A-side of a single (youtube link).

Additional info: wikipedia, secondhandsongs


87. The House of the Rising Sun (1964)

[imgsize 175x175]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/b3199d5870deaf082cc53d3b7524f935/4323327.jpg[/imgsize]
Traditional song of unknown writer, the first known recording was made by Ashley and Foster in 1933, being released as "Rising Sun Blues" in 1933 on Vocalion label as the A-side of a single (youtube link). It is disputed but some sources claim that the inspiration for The Animals cover came from the version recorded by Bob Dylan on November 20th of 1961, released on March 19th of 1962 as the tenth song of his debut album "Bob Dylan" (youtube link).

[imgsize 175x175]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/a3502265571fb6f097c25593d840c74b/2481450.jpg[/imgsize]
Recorded by The Animals on May 18th of 1964 at De Lane Lea Studios, London arranged by Alan Price and produced by Mickey Most and released on June 19th of 1964 on Columbia label as the A-side of a single (youtube link).

Additional info: wikipedia, secondhandsongs.
According to Wikipedia: "An interview with Eric Burdon revealed that he first heard the song in a club in Newcastle, England, where it was sung by the Northumbrian folk singer Johnny Handle. (…) This interview refutes assertions that the inspiration for their arrangement came from Bob Dylan. The band enjoyed a huge hit with the song, much to Dylan's chagrin when his version was referred to as a cover."



And, as a bonus, 5 more songs on AM Top 100 not exactly covers but with shared songwriting credits because of the use of samples of other songs (or even because of plagiarism):


33. Paper Planes (2007)

[imgsize 175x175]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/43275f4ded38dbf5ae9318baebc43aec/2563106.jpg[/imgsize]
"Straight to Hell" was written by Joe Strummer, Mick Jones, Paul Simonon and Topper Headon, recorded by The Clash in December of 1981 to January of 1982 (the backing track was recorded on New Year's Eve, 1981) at Electric Lady Studios, New York City produced by The Clash and Glyn Johns and released on May 14th of 1982 on CBS label as the sixth song (closing the A-side) of the album "Combat Rock" (youtube link).

[imgsize 175x175]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/5a7fb969f451efbbdbc6982cad5486f1/1984841.jpg[/imgsize]
"Paper Planes" was written by Mathangi Arulpragasam (aka M.I.A.) and Wesley Pentz (aka Diplo) but, since it includes samples from The Clash's Straight to Hell, Joe Strummer, Mick Jones, Paul Simonon and Topper Headon are credited as co-writers. It was recorded by M.I.A. in 2007 at the artist's home in Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn and in London produced by Diplo and Switch and released on August 21st of 2007 on Interscope label as the eleventh song of the album "Kala" (youtube link).

[imgsize 75x75]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/a25ba137da0 ... 273115.jpg[/imgsize]
"Paper Planes" also includes an uncredited sample of Wreckx-N-Effect feat. Teddy Riley's Rump Shaker (1992).

Additional info: wikipedia, secondhandsongs.
According to Wikipedia: "The song was written by M.I.A. and Diplo. The song's backing track is a sample of the 1982 song "Straight to Hell" by The Clash, and the members of The Clash are credited as co-writers of the song. The chorus of "Paper Planes" was widely speculated to be based on the chorus to the 1992 song "Rump Shaker" by Wreckx-N-Effect, although that song's writers are not credited."


52. Crazy (2006)

[imgsize 175x175]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/88a45fdf1c1ef0d19fac7e2f5101418c/2047099.jpg[/imgsize]
"Nel cimitero di Tucson" ("Last Man Standing") was written and recorded by Gianfranco Reverberi and Gian Piero Reverberi in 1968 and released in Italy as part of the soundtrack of the movie "Preparati la bara!" (youtube link). I haven't found information about the original release, the complete soundtrack was released on CD in 2007 after the success of "Crazy."

[imgsize 175x175]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/babe64d5bfb1e19b766e9bf10186643d/4318009.jpg[/imgsize]
"Crazy" was written by Brian Burton (aka Danger Mouse) and Thomas Callaway (aka CeeLo Green) but, since it includes samples from Gianfranco Reverberi and Gian Piero Reverberi's Last Man Standing, Gianfranco Reverberi and Gian Piero Reverberi are credited as co-writers. It was recorded by Gnarls Barkley in 2005 at Maze Studios, Atlanta, Georgia and (probably) Power Plant Studios, Los Angeles, California produced by Danger Mouse and released on April 3rd of 2006 on Warner label as the title song of a CD-single (youtube link).

[imgsize 75x75]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/ce1b90850fb ... 150178.jpg[/imgsize]
"Crazy" also includes an uncredited sample of Garnet Mimms' Stop and Check Yourself (1972).

Additional info: wikipedia, secondhandsongs.
According to Wikipedia ""Crazy" was inspired by film scores of Spaghetti Westerns, in particular by the works of Ennio Morricone, who is best known as the composer of Sergio Leone's Dollars Trilogy, but more specifically the song "Last Man Standing" by Gian Piero Reverberi and Gianfranco Reverberi from the 1968 spaghetti Western Viva! Django (Italian: Preparati la bara), a sequel to the better-known Django. "Crazy" not only samples the song, but utilizes the parts of the main melody and chord structure. The original songwriters for "Last Man Standing" are credited by Gnarls Barkley for this song alongside their own credits."


66. Bitter Sweet Symphony (1997)

[imgsize 175x175]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/c0e2348dded589841e3b11a5de3cc392/3303874.jpg[/imgsize]
"The Last Time" was written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, recorded by The Andrew Oldham Orchestra in 1965 arranged by David Whitaker and produced by Andrew Oldham and released on June 3rd of 1966 on Decca label as the eleventh song (and closer) of the album "The Rolling Stones Songbook" (youtube link).

[imgsize 175x158]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/51f0ce51c949161a6e29ddb04f423f6e/1880545.jpg[/imgsize]
"Bitter Sweet Symphony" was written by Richard Ashcroft but it includes samples from The Andrew Oldham Orchestra's The Last Time. A lawsuit interposed by Allen Klein (former manager of The Rolling Stones) forced to credit the song entirely to Mick Jagger and Keith Richards. Recorded by The Verve in 1996 at Olympics Studios, London, England produced by Youth and The Verve and released on June 16th of 1997 on Hut label as the title song of a CD-single (youtube link).

Additional info: wikipedia, secondhandsongs.
According to Wikipedia: "Although the song's lyrics were written by Verve vocalist Richard Ashcroft, its distinctive passage for strings was sampled from the 1965 Andrew Oldham Orchestra symphonic recording of "The Last Time", arranged & written by David Whitaker, inspired by the 1965 Rolling Stones' song of the same title. Originally, The Verve had negotiated a licence to use a five-note sample from the Oldham recording, but former Stones manager Allen Klein (who owned the copyrights to the band’s pre-1970 songs) claimed the Verve broke the agreement and used a larger portion. Despite its original lyrics and string intro (by Wil Malone & Ashcroft), the music of "Bitter Sweet Symphony" was sampled from the Oldham track, which led to a lawsuit with ABKCO Records, Allen Klein's holding company, and eventually settled out of court. The Verve relinquished all of their royalties to Allen Klein, owner of ABKCO Records, whilst songwriting credits were changed to Jagger/Richards/Ashcroft. "We were told it was going to be a 50/50 split, and then they saw how well the record was doing," says band member Simon Jones. "They rung up and said we want 100 percent or take it out of the shops, you don't have much choice." After losing the composer credits to the song, Richard Ashcroft commented, "This is the best song Jagger and Richards have written in 20 years," noting it was their biggest UK hit since "Brown Sugar."


76. 99 Problems (2003)

[imgsize 175x175]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/f082b2e729c4e1ea9d45ffd3cbb294fd/1214959.jpg[/imgsize] [imgsize 175x175]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/1e989bed8e147d0648eee47c2471416e/2314067.jpg[/imgsize]
"The Big Beat" was written and recorded by Billy Squire in 1979-1980 at Eddie Offord's remote studio, Woodstock, New York produced by Billy Squire and Eddie Offord and released in May of 1980 on Capitol label as the first song of the album "The Tale of the Tape" (youtube link).
"Long Red" was written by Norman Landsberg, Felix Pappalardi, John Ventura and Leslie Weinstein, recorded by Mountain on August 16th of 1969 live at Woodstock Festival, Bethel, New York produced by Felix Pappalardi and released on May 13th of 1972 on Windfall label as the first song of the live album "Live - The Road Goes Ever On" (youtube link).

[imgsize 175x175]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/3cb1df2f3553f833423dc960f981f1e9/3537126.jpg[/imgsize]
"99 Problems" was written by Jay-Z but, since it includes samples from Billy Squire's The Big Beat and Mountain's Long Red, Billy Squire, Norman Landsberg, Felix Pappalardi, John Ventura and Leslie Weinstein are credited as co-writers. It was recorded by Jay-Z in 2003 at The Mansion, Laurel Canyon, Los Angeles, California and Akademie Mathematique of Philosophical Sound Research, Los Angeles, California produced by Rick Rubin and released on November 14th of 2003 on Roc-A-Fella label as the ninth song of the album "The Black Album" (youtube link).

[imgsize 75x75]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/c46cb234aba ... 549882.jpg[/imgsize] [imgsize 75x75]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/4c04ce48255 ... 240489.jpg[/imgsize] [imgsize 75x75]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/3504b5fd137 ... 638982.png[/imgsize] [imgsize 75x75]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/2b45fdac9b1 ... 113968.jpg[/imgsize]
"99 Problems" also includes samples of Wilson Pickett's Get Me Back on Time, Engine #9 (1970), Ice-T feat. Brother Marquis' 99 Problems (1993), UGK's Touched (1996) and LL Cool J's To da Break of Dawn (1990).

Additional info: wikipedia, secondhandsongs.
According to Wikipedia "In creating the track Rubin used some classic 1980s sample staples such as "The Big Beat" by Billy Squier, "Long Red" by Mountain, and "Get Me Back On Time" by Wilson Pickett. These songs were long coveted by early hip hop producers, in particular the drum beat from Big Beat. (…) The title and chorus are taken from Ice-T's "99 Problems" from his 1993 album Home Invasion. The song featured Brother Marquis of 2 Live Crew. The original song was more profane and describes a wide range of sexual conquests. (…) Jay-Z begins his third verse directly quoting lines from Bun B's opening verse off the track "Touched" from the UGK album Ridin' Dirty."


83. Whole Lotta Love (1969)

[imgsize 175x175]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/bf8c3399c4333ddebac61587051b0724/1750954.jpg[/imgsize]
"You Need Love" was written by Willie Dixon, recorded by Muddy Waters on October 12 of 1962 at Chess Studios, Chicago, Illinois and released in December of 1962 on Chess label as the A-side of a single (youtube link). The Small Faces recorded in 1965 "You Need Loving" credited to Ronnie Lane and Steve Marriot (but based on Waters' "You Need Love"), released on May 11th of 1966 on Decca label as the ninth song of their debut album "Small Faces" (youtube link).

[imgsize 175x175]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/42ede393962310ca37837dfe8eb232b6/2033534.jpg[/imgsize]
"Whole Lotta Love" was written by Jimmy Page, Robert Plant, John Paul Jones and John Bonham but with parts of the lyrics taken from Muddy Waters' You Need Love. A lawsuit interposed by Willie Dixon in 1985 forced Led Zeppelin to share with him songwriting credits. Recorded by Led Zeppelin in 1969 at various studios in the UK and North America produced by Jimmy Page and released on October 22nd of 1969 on Hut label as the first song of the album "Led Zeppelin II" (youtube link).

Additional info: wikipedia, secondhandsongs. According to Wikipedia: "In 1962, Muddy Waters recorded "You Need Love", written for him by peer Willie Dixon. In 1966 British mod band the Small Faces recorded the song as "You Need Loving" for their eponymous début Decca LP. Some of the lyrics of Led Zeppelin's version were copied from the Willie Dixon song, a favourite of Plant's. Plant's phrasing is particularly similar to that of Steve Marriott's in the Small Faces' version. Similarities with "You Need Love" would lead to a lawsuit against Led Zeppelin in 1985, settled out of court in favour of Dixon. The Small Faces were never sued by Dixon, even though "You Need Loving" still only credits Ronnie Lane and Steve Marriott. According to Robert Plant: "Page's riff was Page's riff. It was there before anything else. I just thought, 'well, what am I going to sing?' That was it, a nick. Now happily paid for. At the time, there was a lot of conversation about what to do. It was decided that it was so far away in time and influence that...well, you only get caught when you're successful. That's the game"."


And, as a second bonus, other songs on AM Top 100 that includes samples (or borrowed lyrics or music) according to whosampled.com:


[imgsize 75x75]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/9b39ffef34f ... 747027.jpg[/imgsize] [imgsize 75x75]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/8365e15d234 ... 746030.jpg[/imgsize]
10. Chuck Berry's Johnny B. Goode (1958) uses the riff of the intro of Louis Jordan and His Tympany Five's Ain't That Just Like a Woman (They'll Do It Every Time) (1946).
Wikipedia: "The opening guitar riff on "Johnny B. Goode" is essentially a note-for-note copy of the opening single-note solo on Louis Jordan's "Ain't That Just Like a Woman" (1946), played by guitarist Carl Hogan."


[imgsize 75x75]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/c897aa57916 ... 028246.jpg[/imgsize] [imgsize 75x75]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/151159810e0 ... 217841.jpg[/imgsize]
20. Led Zeppelin's Stairway to Heaven (1969) uses a similar arrangement for the guitar intro to Spirit's Taurus (1968).
Wikipedia: "Over the years, a number of people have put forth the opinion that the song's introduction, and opening guitar arpeggios, bear a close resemblance to the 1968 instrumental "Taurus" by the group Spirit. Zeppelin opened for Spirit in an early American tour, leaving little doubt that Led Zeppelin had heard the Spirit song before "Stairway to Heaven" was written."


[imgsize 75x75]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/b7853eb2e6c ... 852362.jpg[/imgsize] [imgsize 75x75]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/836b70b11b4 ... 893269.jpg[/imgsize]
41. New Order's Blue Monday (2003) contains samples from Kraftwerk' Uranium (1975).
Wikipedia: "According to Bernard Sumner, (…) the long keyboard pad on the intro and outro was sampled from the Kraftwerk song "Uranium", from the Radio-Activity album."


[imgsize 75x75]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/5da80b136e5 ... 794352.jpg[/imgsize] [imgsize 75x75]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/d73b66e6cc3 ... 54849.jpeg[/imgsize]
47. Beyoncé feat. Jay-Z's Crazy in Love (2003) contains samples from The Chi-Lites' Are You My Woman (Tell Me So) (1970)
Wikipedia: "The track's horn-driven hook samples instrumentation from The Chi-Lites' 1970 song "Are You My Woman (Tell Me So).""


[imgsize 75x75]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/91e091848db ... 372795.jpg[/imgsize] [imgsize 75x75]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/31a9c47753a ... 397558.jpg[/imgsize][imgsize 75x75]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/1350134e451 ... 513289.jpg[/imgsize]
60. Massive's Unfinished Sympathy (1991) contains samples from J.J. Johnson's Parade Strut (1974) and Mahavishnu Orchestra and John McLaughlin's Planetary Citizen (1976).
Wikipedia: "The song's initial tone is set by "chilled hip hop beats" and samples of a percussion break from "Parade Strut (Instrumental)" by J. J. Johnson. (…) Vocal samples of a man singing "hey, hey, hey, hey..." – originating from John McLaughlin and the Mahavishnu Orchestra's "Planetary Citizen" – are present throughout the song."


[imgsize 75x75]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/c718267f329 ... 338322.jpg[/imgsize] [imgsize 75x75]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/ac3eb159555 ... 601129.jpg[/imgsize][imgsize 75x75]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/f1bf50c5eb4 ... 378446.jpg[/imgsize]
64. Missy 'Misdemeanor' Elliott's Get Ur Freak On (2001) contains samples from Karunesh's Solitude (2000) and Memphis Bleek feat. Jay Z, Twista and Missy Elliott's Is That Your Chick (The Lost Verses) (2000).


[imgsize 75x75]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/601071f6cf2 ... 544451.jpg[/imgsize] [imgsize 75x75]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/78efc119eef ... 552410.jpg[/imgsize] [imgsize 75x75]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/d51609a9451 ... 471223.jpg[/imgsize]
72. Beck's Loser (1993) contains samples from Johnny Jenkins' I Walk on Gilded Splinters (1970) and Thomas Hendrix's Driver Winner (1994).
Wikipedia: "The song's drum track is sampled from a Johnny Jenkins cover of Dr. John's "I Walk on Gilded Splinters" from the 1970 album Ton-Ton Macoute!. During the song's break, there is a sample of a line of dialogue from the 1994 Steve Hanft-directed film Kill the Moonlight, which goes "I’m a driver/I’m a winner/Things are gonna change, I can feel it"."


[imgsize 75x75]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/2ba82346ad1 ... 995084.jpg[/imgsize] [imgsize 75x75]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/072e2ff468b ... 66548.jpeg[/imgsize]
91. The Smiths' How Soon Is Now? (1984) contains a keyboard melody line taken from Lovebug Starski's You've Gotta Believe (1982).
Johnny Marr in an interview for The Quietus about the primary influence black music had on The Smiths: "'Boy With The Thorn In His Side', from the second verse onwards, if you listen to it, it's just Nile Rodgers playing guitar - 'How Soon Is Now' has got a hip hop thing in it from Lovebug Starski."


[imgsize 75x75]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/078099955fa ... 347437.jpg[/imgsize] [imgsize 75x75]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/8692e721ae8 ... 207662.jpg[/imgsize]
92. Chic's Good Times (1979) contains lyrics samples from Leo Reisman and His Orchestra's Happy Days Are Here Again (1929).
Wikipedia: "The lyrics are largely based on Milton Ager's "Happy Days Are Here Again." It also contains lines based on lyrics featured in "About a Quarter to Nine" made famous by Al Jolson. Nile Rodgers has stated that these depression-era lyrics were used as a hidden way to comment on the then-current economic depression in the United States."


[imgsize 75x75]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/e915261544a ... 352737.jpg[/imgsize]
98. Public Enemy's Fight the Power (1989) contains samples from a total of 19 songs, including "Different Strokes" by Syl Johnson (1967), "Funky Drummer" by James Brown (1970), "Fight the Power" by The Isley Brothers (1975), "Sing a Simple Song" by Sly & the Family Stone (1968), "I Don't Know What This World Is Coming To" by The Soul Children feat. Jesse Jackson (1972), "Hot Pants Road" by The J.B.'s (1970), "I Shot the Sheriff" by Bob Marley and The Wailers (1973), "Planet Rock" by Afrika Bambaataa and Soulsonic Force (1982), "Say It Loud, I'm Black and I'm Proud" by James Brown (1968), "Whatcha See Is Whatcha Get" by The Dramatics (1971), "Teddy's Jam" by Guy (1988), "Let's Dance (Make Your Body Move)" by West Street Mob (1981), "I Know You Got Soul" by Bobby Byrd (1971), "Funky President" by James Brown (1974), "Pump Me Up" by Trouble Funk (1982), "Give It to Me Baby" by Rick James (1981), "Saturday Night Live From Washington DC Pt. 1" by Trouble Funk (1983) and "AJ Scratch" by Kurtis Blow (1984).
Wikipedia: "Chuck D recalled the track's extravagant looping and production, saying that "we put loops on top of loops on top of loops"."
Last edited by Honorio on Wed Dec 10, 2014 10:52 pm, edited 2 times in total.

User avatar
Bruce
Die Mensch Maschine
Posts: 1232
Joined: Tue Jul 23, 2013 5:36 am
Location: New Jersey

Re: Most Acclaimed Covers/Remakes

Post by Bruce » Sun Aug 10, 2014 1:50 pm

Honorio wrote:
Some of the originals were also ranked on Acclaimed Music Top 6000:
- I Heard It Through the Grapevine - Gladys Knight and The Pips (#5937)
Gladys Knight's version is not the original. It was first recorded by the Miracles.

User avatar
Honorio
Die Mensch Maschine
Posts: 2489
Joined: Sat Feb 11, 2012 7:38 am
Location: L'Eliana, Valencia, Spain

Re: Most Acclaimed Covers/Remakes

Post by Honorio » Sun Aug 10, 2014 3:19 pm

Of course, if you simply continue reading the text you will find out. Knight's was the first released version but the Miracles' and Gaye's version were recorded before.

User avatar
Bruce
Die Mensch Maschine
Posts: 1232
Joined: Tue Jul 23, 2013 5:36 am
Location: New Jersey

Re: Most Acclaimed Covers/Remakes

Post by Bruce » Sun Aug 10, 2014 3:28 pm

Honorio wrote:
26. Louie Louie (1963)

[imgsize 175x175]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/ccfbe160bea3c1b2424df224dfc48a08/1820602.jpg[/imgsize]
Written by Richard Berry, recorded by Richard Berry and the Pharaohs in 1957 and released in April of 1957 on Flip label as the B-side of the single "You Are My Sunshine" (youtube link).

[imgsize 175x175]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/da8006910059811450aa6927bb2c9440/3953982.jpg[/imgsize]
Recorded by The Kingsmen on April 6th 1963 at Northwestern Inc. Motion Pictures and Recording, Portland, Oregon produced by Ken Chase and Jerry Dennon and released in May of 1963 on Jerden label as the A-side of a single (youtube link).
Here's the version that the Kingsmen were copying. Right down to the "Let's give it to them right now" shoutout just before the break. From 1961.

User avatar
Bruno
Die Mensch Maschine
Posts: 1301
Joined: Sun Feb 19, 2012 1:33 pm
Location: São Paulo, Brasil
Contact:

Re: Most Acclaimed Covers/Remakes

Post by Bruno » Sun Aug 10, 2014 3:44 pm

Amazing job, Honorio!

User avatar
Honorio
Die Mensch Maschine
Posts: 2489
Joined: Sat Feb 11, 2012 7:38 am
Location: L'Eliana, Valencia, Spain

Re: Most Acclaimed Covers/Remakes

Post by Honorio » Sun Aug 10, 2014 3:51 pm

Thanks, Bruno!
Bruce wrote:Here's the version that the Kingsmen were copying. Right down to the "Let's give it to them right now" shoutout just before the break. From 1961.
Well, you're right. Given the fact that I mentioned (and linked) the Freddie Bell and the Bellboys' version of "Hound Dog" and Small Faces' "You Need Loving" it's probably fair to mention the Rockin' Robin Roberts version of "Louie Louie." I just added it to the text.

User avatar
Romain
Die Mensch Maschine
Posts: 3930
Joined: Fri Feb 10, 2012 2:25 pm
Location: Lyon, France

Re: Most Acclaimed Covers/Remakes

Post by Romain » Sun Aug 10, 2014 4:09 pm

Honorio, its is so perfect. A huge thank for this perfect job. I learned many things (the original sample for Paper Planes for example).

If you want to continue this with the Top 6000 songs ( :mrgreen: ) I will read you.
Bravo.

User avatar
Honorio
Die Mensch Maschine
Posts: 2489
Joined: Sat Feb 11, 2012 7:38 am
Location: L'Eliana, Valencia, Spain

Re: Most Acclaimed Covers/Remakes

Post by Honorio » Sun Aug 10, 2014 6:50 pm

He, he, he, many thanks, Romain. :D
I wouldn't mind to continue with the Top 6000 if I had the time because I learned a lot myself (for instance I've been really surprised to learn that the guitar intros of "Johnny B. Goode" or "Stairway to Heaven" were not completely original).
Anyway I can recommend to visit Who Sampled or Second Hand Songs, absolute goldmines.

User avatar
Honorio
Die Mensch Maschine
Posts: 2489
Joined: Sat Feb 11, 2012 7:38 am
Location: L'Eliana, Valencia, Spain

Re: Most Acclaimed Covers/Remakes

Post by Honorio » Sat Nov 22, 2014 4:52 pm

Second part of "most acclaimed covers," including the songs on positions 101-200 of AM main list. As you are about to see, we got less entries this time.


A) Covers:

111. Walk This Way (1986)

[imgsize 175x175]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/dd1aff269e8df2bf12ff4e3371c01d43/2522105.jpg[/imgsize]
Written by Steven Tyler and Joe Perry, recorded by Aerosmith in January and February of 1975 at Record Plant Studios, New York City, New York produced by Jack Douglas and released on April 8th of 1975 on Columbia label as the fourth song of the album "Toys in the Attic" (youtube link).

[imgsize 175x175]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/21da270b1ef405713667a6f057ace705/4997252.jpeg[/imgsize]
Recorded by Run-D.M.C. featuring Steven Tyler and Joe Perry in 1985 at Chung King House of Metal, New York City, New York produced by Rick Rubin and Russell Simmons and released on May 15th of 1986 on Profile label as the fourth song of the album "Raising Hell" (youtube link).

Additional info: wikipedia, secondhandsongs


114. That's All Right (1954)

[imgsize 175x175]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/1fd1e53fc4bc4dcf4e80f7c67a5a995e/3943271.jpg[/imgsize]
Written by Arthur Crudup and recorded by Arthur "Big Boy" Crudup on September 6th of 1946 in Chicago, Illinois and released in 1946 on RCA Victor label as the B-side of the single "Crudup's After Hours" (youtube link).

[imgsize 175x175]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/861e6c14fc255eb927fb670c62425067/1849968.jpg[/imgsize]
Recorded by Elvis Presley, Scotty and Bill on July 5th of 1954 at Memphis Recording Service (later named Sun Studios), Memphis, Tennessee produced by Sam Phillips and released on July 19th of 1954 on Sun label as the A-side of a single (youtube link).

Additional info: wikipedia, secondhandsongs


126. Mystery Train (1955)

[imgsize 175x175]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/dc6fd35dbce128e61bda0c112861e225/4868191.jpg[/imgsize]
Written by Junior Parker, recorded by Little Junior's Blue Flames in September-October of 1953 at Memphis Recording Service, Memphis, Tennessee produced by Sam Phillips and released in November of 1953 on Sun label as the A-side of a single (youtube link).

[imgsize 175x175]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/d5ef762fe6223c87a976dce4e5b0938c/1850003.jpg[/imgsize]
Recorded by Elvis Presley, Scotty and Bill on July 11th of 1955 at Memphis Recording Service, Memphis, Tennessee produced by Sam Phillips and released on August 20th of 1955 on Sun label as the B-side of the single "I Forgot to Remember to Forget" (youtube link). This version added song-writing credits to Sam Phillips.

Additional info: wikipedia, secondhandsongs


182. Blueberry Hill (1956)

[imgsize 175x175]http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/d ... ryHill.jpg[/imgsize]
Written by Vincent Rose, Larry Stock and Al Lewis, first recorded by Sammy Kaye and His Orchestra with vocal refrain by Tommy Ryan in 1940 and released on May 31st of 1940 on Victor label as the A-side of a single (spotify link).

[imgsize 175x175]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/2db4e6eaa413c87f3ff917dfa4587660/4874301.jpg[/imgsize]
Recorded by Fats Domino on June 26th of 1956 at Master Recorders Studios in Los Angeles, California produced by Dave Bartholomew and released in September of 1956 on Imperial label as the A-side of a single (youtube link).

Additional info: wikipedia, secondhandsongs


189. Papa Was a Rollin' Stone (1973)

[imgsize 175x175]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/33e411ea37dd4a2adeec2bb042757892/1750899.jpg[/imgsize]
Written by Norman Whitfield and Barrett Strong, recorded by The Undisputed Truth in 1971 produced by Norman Whitfield and released on May 2nd of 1972 on Gordy label as the A-side of a single (youtube link).

[imgsize 175x175]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/4f912aad4b9cdedd485acda981008890/2849844.jpg[/imgsize]
Recorded by The Temptations on May 15th, June 14th, 22nd and 28th of 1972 at Hitsville USA Studio A, Detroit, Michigan produced by Norman Whitfield and released on July 27th of 1972 on Gordy label as the third song of the album "All Directions" (youtube link).

Additional info: wikipedia, secondhandsongs


193. Hurt (2002)

[imgsize 175x157]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/66b08d337d1e4e479b148626dff10b80/2557124.jpg[/imgsize]
Written by Trent Reznor, recorded by Nine Inch Nails in 1992-1993 at Le Pig, Record Plant Studios and A&M Studios, Los Angeles, California produced by Trent Reznor and released on March 8th of 1994 on Nothing label as the fourteenth song (and closer) of the album "The Downward Spiral" (youtube link).

[imgsize 175x175]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/772624e97b7d8a18cbfb53b37979d33d/2723588.jpg[/imgsize]
Recorded by Johnny Cash in 2002 at Cash Cabin Studio, Nashville, Tennessee and Akademie Mathematique of Philosophical Sound Research, Los Angeles, California produced by Rick Rubin and released on November 5th of 2002 on American label as the second song of the album "American IV: The Man Comes Around" (youtube link).

Additional info: wikipedia, secondhandsongs


Three of the original versions were also included in Acclaimed Music lists:
- Walk This Way - Aerosmith (#407)
- Mystery Train - Little Junior's Blue Flames (#3001)
- Hurt - Nine Inch Nails (#980)


B) Shared songwriting credits:
(because of samples or even plagiarism)


143. Creep (1992)

[imgsize 175x175]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/f291152a880d61ee993fc9d88a1b973e/1531556.jpg[/imgsize]
"The Air That I Breathe" was written by Albert Hammond and Mike Hazlewood, recorded by Albert Hammond in 1972 and released in December of 1972 on Mums label as the tenth song (and closer) of the album "It Never Rains in Southern California" (youtube link).

[imgsize 182x175]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/7190eed5498dc03cb74b605ab0177418/3629581.jpg[/imgsize]
"Creep" was written by Colin Greenwood, Jonny Greenwood, Ed O'Brien, Phil Selway and Thom Yorke but, given some similarities with Albert Hammond's The Air That I Breathe, Albert Hammond and Mike Hazlewood were credited as co-writers after a lawsuit. "Creep" was recorded by Radiohead in 1992 at Chipping Norton Recording Studios, Oxfordshire, UK produced by Sean Slade and Paul Q. Kolderie and released on September 21st of 1992 on Parlophone label as the A-side of a single (youtube link).

Additional info: wikipedia, secondhandsongs
According to Wikipedia: "Due to similarities to "The Air That I Breathe", a song recorded by The Hollies in 1973, Radiohead was successfully sued for plagiarism. Consequently, Albert Hammond and Mike Hazlewood are credited as co-writers of "Creep". "Creep" uses a chord progression used in "The Air That I Breathe" in its verse and a melody from "The Air That I Breathe" in the bridge following the second chorus."


150. Rapper's Delight (1979)

[imgsize 175x175]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/078099955fac61cfda098ff4f5683ffc/2347437.jpg[/imgsize]
"Good Times" was written by Bernard Edwards and Nile Rodgers, recorded by Chic in 1979 at Power Station Studios, New York City, New York produced by Bernard Edwards and Nile Rodgers and released on June 4th of 1979 as the A-side of a single (youtube link).

[imgsize 175x175]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/6ab73b6ac7f9053b1dee3ddc069ff491/5352383.jpg[/imgsize]
"Rapper's Delight" was written by Sylvia Robinson, Henry 'Big Bank Hank' Jackson, Michael 'Wonder Mike' Wright and Guy 'Master Gee' O'Brien but, since it includes an interpolation (replayed sample) from Chic's Good Times, Bernard Edwards and Nile Rodgers were credited as co-writers after a settlement. It was recorded by Sugarhill Gang in 1979 at Sugar Hill Studios, Englewood, New Jersey produced by Sylvia Robinson and released in November of 1979 on Sugar Hill label as the A-side of a single (youtube link).

[imgsize 75x75]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/6028d9bb0ad ... 650777.jpg[/imgsize]
"Rapper's Delight" also includes an uncredited interpolation of Love De-Luxe with Hawkshaw's Discophonia's Here Comes That Sound Again (1979).

Additional info: wikipedia, secondhandsongs
According to Wikipedia "On September 20, 1979 and September 21, 1979, Blondie and Chic were playing concerts with The Clash in New York at The Palladium. When Chic started playing "Good Times", rapper Fab Five Freddy and the members of the Sugarhill Gang ("Big Bank Hank" Jackson, Mike Wright, and "Master Gee" O'Brien), jumped up on stage and started freestyling with the band. A few weeks later Rodgers was on the dance floor of New York club Leviticus and heard the DJ play a song which opened with Bernard Edwards' bass line from Chic's "Good Times". Rodgers approached the DJ who said he was playing a record he had just bought that day in Harlem. The song turned out to be an early version of "Rapper's Delight," which also included a scratched version of the song's string section. Rodgers and Edwards immediately threatened legal action over copyright, which resulted in a settlement and their being credited as co-writers. Rodgers admitted that he was originally upset with the song, but would later declare it to be "one of his favorite songs of all time" and his favorite of all the tracks that sampled Chic (although it wasn't sampled, but was interpolated)."


194. Folsom Prison Blues (1955)

[imgsize 180x175]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/827260e712f8639586f69fbdd35d7089/1323817.jpg[/imgsize]
"Crescent City Blues" was written by Gordon Jenkins, recorded by Gordon Jenkins featuring Beverly Mahr on vocals in May of 1953 and released in January of 1954 on Decca label as part of "The Conductor (The Second Dream)," the second track of the album "Gordon Jenkins' Seven Dreams (A Musical Fantasy)" (youtube link).

[imgsize 175x175]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/325cec7ed2fbdb90f39adcffdc2bcd2c/1721470.jpg[/imgsize]
"Folsom Prison Blues" was written by Johnny Cash but, since the melody and part of the lyrics were taken from Gordon Jenkins' Crescent City Blues, Cash paid a settlement to Jenkins. Recorded by Johnny Cash and Tennessee Two on July 30th of 1955 Memphis Recording Service, Memphis, Tennessee produced by Sam Phillips and released on December 15th of 1955 on Sun label as the A-side of a single (youtube link).

Additional info: wikipedia, secondhandsongs
According to Wikipedia: "Cash took the melody for the song and many of the lyrics from Gordon Jenkins's 1953 Seven Dreams concept album, specifically the song "Crescent City Blues." Jenkins was not credited on the original record, which was issued by Sun Records. In the early 1970s, after the song became popular, Cash paid Jenkins a settlement of approximately $75,000."


C) Samples:
(or borrowed music or lyrics not credited on songwriting credits):


[imgsize 75x75]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/7629bf1806c ... 627469.jpg[/imgsize] [imgsize 75x75]http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/1233 ... 67-250.jpg[/imgsize]
135. Animal Collective's My Girls (2009) contains sound samples from NASA's Cassini–Huygens Recordings of Radio Emissions From Saturn's Rings (2007)


[imgsize 75x75]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/d091d804c52 ... 622896.jpg[/imgsize] [imgsize 75x75]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/434e6d2abb1 ... 327884.jpg[/imgsize]
142. The Strokes's Last Nite (2001) uses an opening guitar riff similar to Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers' American Girl (1976).
Wikipedia: "The song's opening guitar riff and overall structure is loosely similar to that of American Girl by Tom Petty and The Heartbreakers. In a 2006 interview with Rolling Stone, Petty commented, "The Strokes took 'American Girl' [for 'Last Nite'], there was an interview that took place with them where they actually admitted it. That made me laugh out loud. I was like, 'OK, good for you.' It doesn't bother me"."


[imgsize 75x75]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/65929c6e712 ... 006872.jpg[/imgsize] [imgsize 75x75]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/2b2445ee8de ... 352032.jpg[/imgsize]
181. Daft Punk's One More Time (2000) contains samples from Eddie Johns' More Spell on You (1979).
Wikipedia: ""One More Time" is believed to contain a sample of "More Spell on You" by Eddie Johns, but this is uncredited in the Discovery liner notes. Bangalter reportedly denied using any samples for the song. A later report however indicated that sampling "More Spell on You" had been officially approved." A quite interesting link about the subject.


[imgsize 75x75]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/f67f3fd904b ... 344341.jpg[/imgsize] [imgsize 75x75]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/78e0def4b11 ... 035276.jpg[/imgsize]
185. Radiohead's Idioteque (2000) contains samples from Paul Lansky's Mild und Leise (1976) and Arthur Kreiger's Short Piece (1976)
Wikipedia: ""Idioteque" contains two credited samples of experimental 1970s computer music. The first is several seconds of Mild und Leise, a piece by Paul Lansky, forming the four chord progression repeated throughout the song. Mild und Leise is 18 minutes long and through composed. The portion sampled by Radiohead is only heard once in the original piece, very briefly. Also sampled is "Short Piece" by Arthur Kreiger, now a professor of music at Connecticut College. Both tracks were compiled on the 1976 LP First Recordings — Electronic Music Winners, which Radiohead instrumentalist Jonny Greenwood stumbled upon while the band was working on Kid A."


[imgsize 75x75]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/bb0e6291b70 ... 776700.jpg[/imgsize] [imgsize 75x75]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/ee3091d8998 ... 439174.jpg[/imgsize] [imgsize 75x75]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/7a33b6d1f38 ... 095465.jpg[/imgsize] [imgsize 75x75]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/2494cb6ff7e ... 674460.jpg[/imgsize] [imgsize 75x75]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/69be768d0f4 ... 611149.jpg[/imgsize]
187. Dr. Dre feat. Snoop Doggy Dogg's Nuthin' But a 'G' Thang (1991) contains samples from Leon Haywood's I Want'a Do Something Freaky to You (1975), Kid Dynamite's Uphill Peace of Mind (1976), Public Enemy's B Side Wins Again (1990) and Congress Alley's Are You Looking (1973).
Wikipedia: "The song contains samples from Leon Haywood's "I Want'a Do Something Freaky To You", "B-Side Wins Again" by Public Enemy and "Uphill (Peace of Mind)" by Kid Dynamite."


[imgsize 75x75]http://eu.rymimg.com/lk/f/l/c0f4ae81b92 ... 422321.jpg[/imgsize] [imgsize 75x75]http://www.whosampled.com/static/track_ ... 565636.jpg[/imgsize]
192. Britney Spears' Toxic (2003) contains samples from Lata Mangeshkar and S. P. Balasubramaniam's Tere Mere Beech Mein (1981).
Wikipedia: "The hook of "Toxic" samples a portion of "Tere Mere Beech Mein", from the soundtrack of the 1981 Hindi film Ek Duuje Ke Liye. However, it is not lifted verbatim from the score and mixes two different sections of the piece."

Hymie
Die Mensch Maschine
Posts: 1495
Joined: Sat Jun 08, 2013 10:37 pm

Re: Most Acclaimed Covers/Remakes

Post by Hymie » Tue Dec 09, 2014 7:22 am

Honorio wrote: Some of the originals were also ranked on Acclaimed Music Top 6000:
- I Heard It Through the Grapevine - Gladys Knight and The Pips (#5937)
- Mr. Tambourine Man - Bob Dylan (#837)
These are not original versions of these songs.

The first version of GRAPEVINE was by Smokey & the Miracles.

The first version of "Mr. Tambourine Man" was by the Brothers Four.

In both cases these were not released first, but were the first recordings of the songs.

In the Brothers Four's case, they were close with Dylan's management and went through some of his demos of songs that had been published but were not yet recorded by anybody. They recorded "Mr. Tambourine Man" and wanted to release it, but as the songwriter Dylan gets to decide who releases the first version of the song and he did not like their version. It came out on one of their albums after Bob's version had been recorded and released.

User avatar
Listyguy
Die Mensch Maschine
Posts: 2125
Joined: Sun Feb 05, 2012 8:34 pm

Re: Most Acclaimed Covers/Remakes

Post by Listyguy » Tue Dec 09, 2014 9:29 pm

Hymie wrote: The first version of "Mr. Tambourine Man" was by the Brothers Four.

In both cases these were not released first, but were the first recordings of the songs.

In the Brothers Four's case, they were close with Dylan's management and went through some of his demos of songs that had been published but were not yet recorded by anybody. They recorded "Mr. Tambourine Man" and wanted to release it, but as the songwriter Dylan gets to decide who releases the first version of the song and he did not like their version. It came out on one of their albums after Bob's version had been recorded and released.
This isn't true. The Brothers Four recorded their version after Dylan had recorded two earlier versions in 1964. So Dylan had the first version of "Mr. Tambourine Man".

Hymie
Die Mensch Maschine
Posts: 1495
Joined: Sat Jun 08, 2013 10:37 pm

Re: Most Acclaimed Covers/Remakes

Post by Hymie » Wed Dec 10, 2014 4:40 am

Listyguy wrote:
Hymie wrote: The first version of "Mr. Tambourine Man" was by the Brothers Four.

In both cases these were not released first, but were the first recordings of the songs.

In the Brothers Four's case, they were close with Dylan's management and went through some of his demos of songs that had been published but were not yet recorded by anybody. They recorded "Mr. Tambourine Man" and wanted to release it, but as the songwriter Dylan gets to decide who releases the first version of the song and he did not like their version. It came out on one of their albums after Bob's version had been recorded and released.
This isn't true. The Brothers Four recorded their version after Dylan had recorded two earlier versions in 1964. So Dylan had the first version of "Mr. Tambourine Man".
Take it up with Dick Rosemont. He's the authority on original versions and he says that Dylan had only recorded a demo before the Brothers Four version.

http://www.originalsproject.us/


According to member Bob Flick, the Brothers Four had some management connection with Bob Dylan and had even shared some gigs. In late 1963, following JFK's assassination, the Brothers Four began looking at more serious material and were presented with some Dylan demos. Among his songs the group chose to record was "Mr. Tambourine Man." As a writer, Dylan has say over who first releases a song and, since he didn't care for the Four's arrangement, it wasn't immediately issued. It appeared on their The Honey Wind Blows album following the Byrds' hit and Dylan's own version. What a coincidence that the Byrds, Brothers Four and Bob Dylan were all signed to Columbia Records!

Bob Dylan's demo has been issued.

User avatar
JimmyJazz
Die Mensch Maschine
Posts: 1293
Joined: Mon Sep 16, 2013 2:28 am
Location: Arizona

Re: Most Acclaimed Covers/Remakes

Post by JimmyJazz » Wed Dec 10, 2014 5:01 am

Hymie wrote:
Listyguy wrote:
Hymie wrote: The first version of "Mr. Tambourine Man" was by the Brothers Four.

In both cases these were not released first, but were the first recordings of the songs.

In the Brothers Four's case, they were close with Dylan's management and went through some of his demos of songs that had been published but were not yet recorded by anybody. They recorded "Mr. Tambourine Man" and wanted to release it, but as the songwriter Dylan gets to decide who releases the first version of the song and he did not like their version. It came out on one of their albums after Bob's version had been recorded and released.
This isn't true. The Brothers Four recorded their version after Dylan had recorded two earlier versions in 1964. So Dylan had the first version of "Mr. Tambourine Man".
Take it up with Dick Rosemont. He's the authority on original versions and he says that Dylan had only recorded a demo before the Brothers Four version.

http://www.originalsproject.us/


According to member Bob Flick, the Brothers Four had some management connection with Bob Dylan and had even shared some gigs. In late 1963, following JFK's assassination, the Brothers Four began looking at more serious material and were presented with some Dylan demos. Among his songs the group chose to record was "Mr. Tambourine Man." As a writer, Dylan has say over who first releases a song and, since he didn't care for the Four's arrangement, it wasn't immediately issued. It appeared on their The Honey Wind Blows album following the Byrds' hit and Dylan's own version. What a coincidence that the Byrds, Brothers Four and Bob Dylan were all signed to Columbia Records!

Bob Dylan's demo has been issued.
Just curious Hymie. You say you aren't Bruce, very well...

But why are you reviving a dead thread, that was started by Bruce, and indulging his trademark stupid, meaningless ramblings about release dates?

It seems rather trolly behavior if you ask me... :whistle:

Hymie
Die Mensch Maschine
Posts: 1495
Joined: Sat Jun 08, 2013 10:37 pm

Re: Most Acclaimed Covers/Remakes

Post by Hymie » Wed Dec 10, 2014 5:11 am

JimmyJazz wrote: Just curious Hymie. You say you aren't Bruce, very well...

But why are you reviving a dead thread, that was started by Bruce, and indulging his trademark stupid, meaningless ramblings about release dates?

It seems rather trolly behavior if you ask me... :whistle:
How dead could it have been when it was still on the first page of threads?

I had not seen it before and I was just recently looking through that Dick Rosemont site so I noticed some things that I thought were off.

If release dates are meaningless perhaps Henrik should do away with the yearly and decade lists and just have an all time list?

User avatar
JimmyJazz
Die Mensch Maschine
Posts: 1293
Joined: Mon Sep 16, 2013 2:28 am
Location: Arizona

Re: Most Acclaimed Covers/Remakes

Post by JimmyJazz » Wed Dec 10, 2014 5:19 am

Hymie wrote:If release dates are meaningless perhaps Henrik should do away with the yearly and decade lists and just have an all time list?
This sentence doesn't sound familiar at all, does it everybody...? :mrgreen:

User avatar
JimmyJazz
Die Mensch Maschine
Posts: 1293
Joined: Mon Sep 16, 2013 2:28 am
Location: Arizona

Re: Most Acclaimed Covers/Remakes

Post by JimmyJazz » Wed Dec 10, 2014 5:23 am

Needless to say, I don't have an issue with a release date being corrected here and there, so my previous statement was rather hyperbolic on my part. However, I do take issue with the fact that, in replying to Honorio's exhaustive work, which most of us here don't typically specialize in making compared to him, and we also greatly enjoy reading and appreciating the hard work he puts into his posts typically, you choose to correct him, as Nicolas once described Bruce when he first arrived, "like a teacher from the 1950s". Point being, corrections are fine, but there is also the statement that, if you don't have ANYTHING nice to say about someone's hard work, then just don't say it at all.

Hymie
Die Mensch Maschine
Posts: 1495
Joined: Sat Jun 08, 2013 10:37 pm

Re: Most Acclaimed Covers/Remakes

Post by Hymie » Wed Dec 10, 2014 5:55 am

JimmyJazz wrote:Needless to say, I don't have an issue with a release date being corrected here and there,
First off, neither of the corrections I made had ANYTHING to do with release dates. But since you brought them up. are you saying that if we see several mistakes in release dates that instead of correcting them all we should only correct one "here and there," so as to not embarrass the poster?

This site is about facts. If someone sees an error somewhere it MUST be corrected. That's why Henrik has a special thread for corrections. People who don't like being corrected should not state facts I suppose.

User avatar
Stephan
Site Admin
Posts: 913
Joined: Sun Feb 05, 2012 10:34 am
Contact:

Re: Most Acclaimed Covers/Remakes

Post by Stephan » Wed Dec 10, 2014 11:56 am

The site is about facts, the forum is about opinions.

DocBrown
Die Mensch Maschine
Posts: 1246
Joined: Tue Apr 23, 2013 2:15 am
Location: Edmonton, Canada

Re: Most Acclaimed Covers/Remakes

Post by DocBrown » Wed Dec 10, 2014 8:08 pm

Stephan wrote:The site is about facts, the forum is about opinions.
Opinions expressed courteously and respected by others, if I may be so bold.

User avatar
Honorio
Die Mensch Maschine
Posts: 2489
Joined: Sat Feb 11, 2012 7:38 am
Location: L'Eliana, Valencia, Spain

Re: Most Acclaimed Covers/Remakes

Post by Honorio » Wed Dec 10, 2014 10:50 pm

Sorry to react late to this discussion, the last days I've been busy preparing a conference. Many thanks Listyguy, Stephan, DocBrown and especially to JimmyJazz (yes, it would have been nice a word of encouragement before or after the correction but I don't mind). And I even want to thank Hymie for the corrections you made. But in my opinion I didn't make any "error" like you stated. It's only a question of different definitions of "original." I consider the "original" version the first released version and you consider it the first recorded version. Not a big deal I suppose. So I just edited the text replacing the word "original" for "first released version," now you can read "some previously released versions were also ranked on Acclaimed Music Top 6000." I even added to the text a comment about the Brothers Four version (despite not being the first released version nor the first recorded, see later).

About "I Heard It Through the Grapevine" I was absolutely aware that the first recorded version was The Miracles' one (and the one released on third place). Just read the text I wrote then, I don't need to change anything.

But I had to disagree about considering The Brothers Four being the "original" version of "Mr. Tambourine Man." I haven't found on the web any note about the exact recording date of this version. Your explanation: "Take it up with Dick Rosemont. He's the authority on original versions and he says that Dylan had only recorded a demo before the Brothers Four version." I'm sorry but the "authority" criterion is not enough, you need to use different sources to state some "facts" (if I use only the authority criteria on my next conference without comparing different sources they'll probably stone me). In fact the Rosemont quote you include has some inaccuracies. If you go to a complete Dylan sessionography that used many different sources like this one or this other one, web pages that use sources as reliable as the Columbia Studios diaries, the original master tapes and data from books from 4 different writers you can reconstruct the story of the recordings of "Mr. Tambourine Man" (see here):
- Dylan began to write the song in February after attending the Mardi Gras and completed it in March-April of 1964 (according to statements of Judy Collins and Al Aronowitz quoted by biographers Clinton Heylin and Nigel Williamson).
- The first performance with a group of friends was at Eric Von Schmidt's home in May of 1964.
- It was premiered in public at the Royal Festival Hall, London, England on May 17th of 1964 (he was going to play that song in 7 other live performances during 1964, including Newport Festival).
- Dylan recorded for the first time at Columbia Studios, New York City, New York on June 9th of 1964 produced by Tom Wilson with Ramblin' Jack Elliot on backing vocals during the session for "Another Side of Bob Dylan." This version was rejected for release by Dylan himself but was finally released on August 30th of 2005 as the fourteenth song of the album "The Bootleg Series Vol. 7: No Direction Home: The Soundtrack" (listen here). This is the version that supposedly inspired The Byrds version.
- Dylan re-recorded the song as a demo for Witmark & Sons in the last session for this publishing company in mid to late June of 1964 accompanying himself with a piano. This version was also released many years after, on October 19th of 2010 as the forty-sixth song of the album "The Bootleg Series Vol. 9: The Witmark Demos: 1962–1964" (listen here). This is the version that supposedly inspired The Brothers Four version.
- The third recording by Dylan of the song is the one noted in my original text (on January 15th of 1965 at Columbia Recording Studios, New York City produced by Tom Wilson and released March 22nd of 1965 as the eighth song of the album "Bringing It All Back Home," listen here), being the first released version.

According to Dick Rosemont "in late 1963, following JFK's assassination, the Brothers Four began looking at more serious material and were presented with some Dylan demos; among his songs the group chose to record was "Mr. Tambourine Man." It's difficult to believe that they heard a demo from this song when it wasn't even on Dylan's head. On the (excellent on the other hand) web page by Dick Rosemont he says that The Brothers Four recorded their version on "1964 (early)." Something also difficult when Dylan sang it for the first time with some friends in May of 1964.
So in my opinion probably The Brothers Four recorded their version in the second half of 1964 (although there is no information about the recording session available on the web). It was the version recorded in third place (after two previous Dylan recordings) and the released also in third place (after the Dylan and Byrds releases). Hardly the "original" version then, even The Byrds recorded a version in November of 1964 before the 1965 Dylan version (when they were still named as The Jet Set, version released on July 29th 1969 closing the album "Preflyte", listen here).

Anyway it's easy to get lost in the game of "first recorded version," many demos should be then considered the original versions (is this the original version of "Strawberry Fields Forever"?). I think I'll stick with my definition of the "first released version."

Hymie
Die Mensch Maschine
Posts: 1495
Joined: Sat Jun 08, 2013 10:37 pm

Re: Most Acclaimed Covers/Remakes

Post by Hymie » Wed Dec 10, 2014 11:08 pm

Honorio wrote:I think I'll stick with my definition of the "first released version."
Okay, so based on that the original version of "Let It Be" is by Aretha Franklin, not the Beatles.....correct?

Hymie
Die Mensch Maschine
Posts: 1495
Joined: Sat Jun 08, 2013 10:37 pm

Re: Most Acclaimed Covers/Remakes

Post by Hymie » Wed Dec 10, 2014 11:24 pm

BTW, H, the Stones stole THE LAST TIME from this:

User avatar
Honorio
Die Mensch Maschine
Posts: 2489
Joined: Sat Feb 11, 2012 7:38 am
Location: L'Eliana, Valencia, Spain

Re: Most Acclaimed Covers/Remakes

Post by Honorio » Fri Dec 12, 2014 6:51 pm

Sorry for the late reply, finally gave my lecture some hours ago.
Hymie wrote:Okay, so based on that the original version of "Let It Be" is by Aretha Franklin, not the Beatles.....correct?
Mmm, I know it's absurd but yes (to a certain extent) following strictly the definition. In fact in my thread about the covers of David Bowie, Beatles and Rolling Stones (see here) I divided the covers in three categories: a) covers b) collaborations and c) demos/remakes. I included in this last category "songs written by Bowie/Lennon/McCartney/Jagger/Richards but first released by other artist and later also officially released by Bowie/Beatles/Stones." I included Aretha Franklin's "Let It Be" in this category.
In some cases trace the original is easy, for instance "Oh! You Pretty Things," written by David Bowie was first recorded and released by Peter Noone (with Bowie playing piano on the recording) and shortly later remade by Bowie for the "Hunky Dory" album. Other cases are much more difficult, especially when there is a first recording by the songwriter but the first released version is from another artist (apart of Franklin's other example is the Flying Burrito Brothers' version of "Wild Horses"). Maybe in these cases the most elegant option is consider both "originals" like on Second Hand Songs web page, when they include both the "first recording" and the "first release" as originals. See their entries for Let It Be and Wild Horses.
Hymie, many thanks for that clip about "The Last Time." Didn't knew that it was a case of plagiarism.

Post Reply